Widgets Magazine
Veterans

5 of the ways to lose the "once a Marine, always a Marine" status

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Frank Cordoba)

You see and hear this term all the time: "former Marine." And, wherever you see it, you'll also see Marines telling you (and everyone else) why we hate it. Sure, there are a few folks out there who agree with it, but those of us who hold the title near and dear to our hearts will tell you a different story.

In my opinion, there's a damned good reason for the expression, "once a Marine, always a Marine." Others disagree.


To be fair, this is not a mentality exclusive to Marines. Just because you "get out" doesn't mean you're no longer a Marine, soldier, airman, coast guardsman, etc. You don't just instantly forget everything you've learned and experienced over the past few years once you get your DD-214. Joining the military makes you a part of a fraternity and you'll find that you resonate better with other veterans than you do with people from any other walk of life for one simple reason: You became a part of something much larger than yourself.

Your membership was paid for in blood, sweat, and tears, along with the countless hours you spent dedicated to the cause. To say a veteran is an "ex-" anything is highly inaccurate.

However, there are certain qualities (mostly conscious choices) that define a former Marine. These are just a few of those qualities:

1. Severe lack of discipline

It's easy to fall into the trap of letting your discipline slide when you get out — in fact, a lot of us are guilty of this. But at some point, we pick it back up and we reintegrate it into our lives. To allow this discipline to drop off entirely is most definitely a conscious choice — one that can lead to the discontinuation of other hard-earned qualities.

Maybe you just need some new Drill Instructors...

(U.S. Marine Corps)

2. Forgotten core values

No matter which branch you join, you'll first learn the core values and then you'll embody them. Those values shape your personal code and you live by them while you're in the military. When you get out, if you aren't still using them to find some direction in life, you've earn the "ex" in front of your title.

3. Lack of leadership

Almost everyone comes out of the military with some type of leadership capabilities. Something you hear often in the military is, "in the absence of leadership, be a leader." This applies heavily to civilian life because there's often severe absence of leadership. If you get out of the military without learning how to take control from time to time, you likely didn't learn much else.

Just remember what you learned.

(U.S. Marine Corps)

4. Lack of punctuality

We're all guilty of being late to something at some point. It just happens, it's the way of life. But, those who learned anything from time in service will remember the factors that played into that tardiness, both self-inflicted and external, and ensure it doesn't happen again.

If you're choosing to be late because you just don't care — you've given up your title.

5. A conscious decision to no longer be a Marine

There's a common belief among those who served that states you should always work to justify the fact that you've earned the right to be called a Marine (or solider, or airmen, etc). You should continuously employ the values learned in service in forming your civilian life.

There is, however, another side to this — and it's simple. If you decide you're no longer fitting of that title because you've grown a beard or whatever other, arbitrary reason, then you aren't.

Many of us still believe in our titles and we're willing to continue to honor it. It's a lifetime effort and, if you're not willing to make the commitment, nobody else will make it for you.

If you define yourself as an "ex-Marine," by all means.

(U.S. Marine Corps)