7 bunkers for riding out the nuclear apocalypse in style

The nuclear apocalypse doesn’t have to be scary. Any of these seven nuclear fallout shelters would make the end of the world relatively comfortable:

1. Cheyenne Mountain Complex

Famous from movies like Dr. Strangelove, WarGames, and Independence Day, the Cheyenne Mountain Complex is a richly appointed bunker and status symbol for the post-apocalypse elite. It feature an underground lake and small boats for re-enacting Lonely Island videos as well as great defenses and a gym.

On the downside, bunker residents would have to share space with the Air Force and NORAD whose 24-hour operations would dampen the boat party. Also, there’s no fighting in the War Room.

2. Mount Weather Emergency Operations Center

Equipped with radio and television studios so you can drop awesome mix tapes, the Mount Weather Emergency Operations Center is for the aspiring rap artist who will capture the post-apocalypse angst. An on-site water treatment plant prevents sewage build-ups and the facility houses 200 people, meaning your whole entourage could come.

Unfortunately, there are very few private rooms and those are reserved for the senior members of the executive branch and the Supreme Court Justices, so bring poncho liners to hang up for privacy in the communal areas.

3. Raven Rock Mountain Complex: Site R

Raven Rock Mountain Complex has great security provided by a company of military police officers dedicated to the complex and defenses to defeat an electromagnetic attack. It reportedly features a stocked Starbucks and a direct underground tunnel to Camp David, the President’s own retreat.

Of course, all those amenities mean that senior military brass and even the president will head here, so expect the culture to get very stodgy very quickly.

4. National Audio-Visual Conservation Center at Mount Pony

National-Audio-video-conservatory-nuclear-bunker

Photos: Library of Congress

The Mount Pony facility is a 140,000-square-foot bunker filled with 90 miles of shelving that hold 1.1 million video items and 3.5 million audio recordings stored there by the Library of Congress. Combined with the 200-seat movie theater in the complex, the Mount Pony facility is the perfect home for the cinephile.

Like the Greenbrier Resort, the site has been decommissioned as a nuclear bunker so denizens must bring their own supplies and should probably invest in a cot. A waste incinerator would also come in handy.

5. For the book lover: The Notch

The bunker at The Notch was originally the command center for the 8th Air Force in case of an attack, but after it was retired it served as storage for the Federal Reserve and is now where Amherst College which keeps a portion of its archive.

Modern survivors in an apocalypse could peruse the materials and enjoy the artifacts while the air conditioning and high ceilings provide a comfortable living environment. And, since the facility is now owned by colleges, there is no military brass to bother you.

6. Underground Complex at North Bay, Canada

Complete with a gym, a cafeteria, and a barber shop, the Underground Complex at North Bay, Canada was the first major underground bunker for riding out the apocalypse. And, since the bunker is mainly manned by the Canadian military, it’s likely to have a very civil command climate.

Unfortunately, its generators draw from the same air as its personnel, limiting the amount of time the bunker can run before everyone suffocates. Originally, this window of time was measured in hours, though modern, efficient generators and computers might allow days of survivability.

7. The Bunker at Greenbrier

2008-0831-TheGreenbrier-North

Photo: Wikipedia/Bobak Ha’Eri

The Bunker at the Greenbrier Resort in West Virginia is one of the most famous bunkers of the Cold War. Designed to house 1,100 of Washington’s elite, the facility has its own medical and dental facilities, great decor, and five large meeting rooms. The cafeteria has fake windows with paintings of the countryside for that classic “pre-wasteland” aesthetic.

Since the site has been decommissioned there is no worry of Congress showing up to ruin the party, but residents will have to bring their own food, water, staff, and diesel fuel.

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