Articles

The inside joke names that soldiers have for different unit patches

For nearly 100 years, U.S. Army soldiers have designed and worn unit patches. And for roughly same amount of time, soldiers have made fun of each other's patches.


The tradition of Army patches dates back to 1918 when the 81st Infantry Division deployed to Europe wearing a shoulder insignia they had designed for training exercises in South Carolina. Other units complained about the unauthorized unit item to Gen. John Pershing who, rather than punishing the 81st, authorized the patch and recommended other units design their own.

Since then, units have designed and worn patches that motivated soldiers, honored the unit lineage, and encapsulated military history. This is a sampling of some of those patches, along with the alternate names that soldiers remember them by.

1. "Leaning Sh-thouse" — 1st Theater Sustainment Command

Photo: US Institute of Heraldry

The arrow is supposed to symbolize the ability of the command to fulfill its mission quickly and effectively, but soldiers decided it looked like an outhouse dropped on a hill.

2. "Broken TV" — 3rd Infantry Division

Photo: US Army Spc. Luke Thornberry

The three lighter stripes symbolize the three major campaigns the division fought in during World War I while the darker stripes symbolize the loyalty of the soldiers who gave their lives. Once TVs were invented, the similarity between a broken set and the patch was undeniable.

3. "Four Lieutenants Pointing North" — 4th Infantry Division

Photo: US Army Markus Rauchenberger

4th Inf. Div. wants you to see their patch and relate the four ivy leaves to fidelity and tenacity. The Army sees it and just thinks about lieutenants getting lost on the land navigation course.

4. "Crushed Beer Can" — 7th Infantry Division

Photo: US Institute of Heraldry

This is supposed to be an hourglass formed from two 7s, a normal one and an inverted one. Of course, it really does look more like a can someone crushed in their grip.

5. "Flaming Anus" — 9th Infantry Division

Photo: US Army Steven Williamson

You see it. You know you do.

6. "Gaggin' Dragon" — 18th Airborne Corps

Photo: US Institute of Heraldry

Their mascot is a Sky Dragon so they went with a big scary dragon ... that needs someone to administer the heimlich.

7. "Electric Strawberry" — 25th Infantry Division

Photo: US Air Force Tech. Sgt. Michael Holzworth

Based out of Hawaii, 25th's patch is a taro leaf, native to Hawaii, with a lightning bolt showing how fast the division completes its missions. Since no one knows what a taro leaf is, most soldiers call it the electric strawberry. They also sometimes get called "Hawaii Power and Light."

8. "Days Inn" — 41st Infantry Division

Photo: US Army Steven Williamson

Like 3rd Infantry Division's, there was nothing odd about this patch when it was adopted in World War I. Still, if you're only familiar with the hotel chain, this patch feels like copyright infringement. Some soldiers from this unit volunteered for service in Afghanistan in 2008, an experience chronicled in Shepherds of Helmand.

9. "Alcoholics Anonymous" — 82nd Airborne Division

Photo: US Army D. Myles Cullen

The 82nd Airborne Division was named the All-American Division after a contest held in Atlanta, Ga. The patch's two A's are meant to call to mind the "All-American" nickname, but many people are, of course, reminded of the alcoholic support group. This wasn't helped by the division's reputation for hard drinking.

10. "Choking Chicken" — 101st Airborne Division

Photo: Wikimedia Commons

The 101st was originally based out of Wisconsin and they based their unit patch off of "Old Abe," a bald eagle carried into combat by the 8th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry Regiment during the Civil War. While Abe was a distinguished bald eagle, the unit patch could easily be seen instead as a chicken with corn stuck in its windpipe.

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