The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years - We Are The Mighty
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The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years

They sure don’t make ‘em like they used to. That’s something that can be said for most things in modern society, all over the world. For some reason, it seems like everything used to be built to last and whatever we’re doing today just doesn’t measure up. 

For evidence of this fact, look no further than the B-52 Stratofortress bomber. Once built to fight World War III not long after the start of the Cold War, the B-52 has managed to stick around for well over 50 years. Now it looks like it might be around for another 50 years after.

When it was first introduced in 1955, the B-52 bomber wasn’t winning any beauty pageants. That’s how it earned the nickname “Big Ugly Fat F**ker,” or “BUFF” for short. But if it’s going to win anything, it’ll win a lifetime achievement award.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
“Oh, I really wasn’t expecting this! I just want to thank Boeing, the U.S. Air Force, all the pilots…” (Airman 1st Class Victor J. Caputo – U.S. Air Force)

The Air Force has built hundreds of these aging beauties, capable of flying more than 8,800 miles on eight turbojet engines without an aerial refuel, dropping 70,000 pounds on an enemy target and then, ostensibly, returning home (with an aerial refuel, of course). That’s a pretty big mission, one only the specially-designed B-52 could fulfill. 

On top of that, it was designed to carry nuclear weapons, as part of the Strategic Air Command’s Cold War-era deterrent strategy. These planes stay aloft for hours protecting the northern skies of the United States and its allies. 

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years

Its staying power is largely due to its low cost of operation and maintenance, its ability to reliably drop ordnance on any target anywhere in the world and its combat performance – the B-52 has dropped bombs in almost every major American conflict since it entered service. 

“When we built the B-52, it was supposed to be a high-altitude nuclear bomber, right? Going to the adversary,” Maj. Gen. Andrew Gebara, Director of Strategic Plans, Programs, and Requirements at Air Force Global Strike Command, told Defense One. “Then it became a low-altitude nuclear bomber. And then it became a high-altitude carpet bomber in Vietnam. And then it became a standoff cruise missile shooter in Desert Storm. And then it became a precision strike close air support platform in Afghanistan and Iraq.” 

Like any aircraft that outlasts its expectations, it did require a facelift now and then. 

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Of course, we all know it’s what’s on the inside (lots of bombs) that counts (U.S. Air Force photo)

In 2013, the Air Force gave its B-52 fleet a major upgrade, called Combat Network Communications Technology (CONECT). It involved replacing the B-52’s electronics, communications technology, computing and avionics. Software upgrades were added, as were new computer servers, modems, radios, data-links, receivers and digital workstations.

Part of that massive overhaul also included upgrading the plane’s primary capabilities: dropping bombs. Its internal weapons bays were adapted to fit modern JDAM bombs, cruise missiles and decoy missiles. It also got its bomb payload increased by 66%. So today’s B-52 Stratofortresses are smarter, relay more information to and from ground control and are deadlier than ever before. 

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
The majestic BUFF takes its grandchildren for an outing over the South China Sea (U.S. Navy photo by Lt. Cmdr. Joseph Stevens)

Now the Air Force is considering giving the B-52 program another major overhaul to the 76 that are still flying today. They’ll be replacing its current Pratt & Whitney TF33 engines (first added in 1966) with new, more efficient ones. Combined with utilizing smaller aircrews, this means the B-52 could fly for more than 100 years, according to a new report from Defense One

The Air Force says it will be the biggest modernization program in the airframe’s history and will allow the B-52 to outlast its supposed replacements, the B-1B Lancer and B-2 Spirit bombers. It will serve right alongside the Air Force’s newest bomber, the B-21 Raider, well into the 2050s.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Pictured: Functional beats flashy (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Marc Feliz)

Now, with the new modernization effort, the Air Force is going to turn the classic BUFF into a modern bomber of the 21st Century. According to Air Force officials, the B-52’s original design made it the perfect plane to upgrade for range and weapons capabilities. This also made it cheaper to upgrade than to design and build a new aircraft. 

They sure don’t make ‘em like they used to.

Articles

The US military took these incredible photos this week

The military has very talented photographers in its ranks, and they constantly attempt to capture what life as a service member is like during training and at war. This is the best of what they shot this week:


AIR FORCE:

An F-15E Strike Eagle sits on the flightline at Incirlik Air Base, Turkey, Nov. 12, 2015. Six F-15Es from the 48th Fighter Wing deployed in support of Operation Inherent Resolve and counter-Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant missions in Iraq and Syria.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo by Airman 1st Class Cory W. Bush/USAF

Aircrew with the 20th Special Operations Squadron and combat controllers with the 26th Special Tactics Squadron execute an aerial and ground demonstration for U.S. Air Force Academy cadets Nov. 10, 2015, in Colorado Springs, Colo. The flyover and demonstration celebrated Veterans Day with future leaders of the Air Force.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo by Airman 1st Class Shelby Kay-Fantozzi/USAF

An F-15E Strike Eagle from the 48th Fighter Wing at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England, lands at Incirlik Air Base, Turkey, Nov. 12, 2015. Six F-15Es are deployed in support of Operation Inherent Resolve and counter-Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant missions in Iraq and Syria. As an air-to-air and air-to-ground fighter aircraft, the F-15E specializes in gaining and maintaining air superiority.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo by Airman 1st Class Cory W. Bush/USAF

ARMY:

U.S. Army Soldiers, assigned to 2nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, conduct operations during Decisive Action Rotation 16-02 at the National Training Center on Fort Irwin, Calif., Nov. 12, 2015.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo by Pfc. Daniel Parrott/US Army

A Soldier, assigned to 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment-Blackhorse, fires an M240B machine gun while acting as an opposing force during Decisive Action Rotation 16-02 at the

National Training Center, Fort Irwin, Calif., Nov. 14, 2015.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo by Spc. Taria Clayton/US Army

NAVY:

PACIFIC OCEAN (Nov. 10, 2015) – The guided-missile destroyer USS Chung-Hoon (DDG 93) fires an SM-2 missile during a live-fire exercise. Sailors from the John C. Stennis Strike Group are participating in a sustainment training exercise (SUSTEX) to prepare for future deployments.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jonathan Jiang/USN

PACIFIC OCEAN (Nov. 16, 2015) The guided-missile destroyer USS Stockdale (DDG 106) sits anchored off the southern coast of California.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Timothy M. Black/USN

ATLANTIC OCEAN (Nov. 16, 2015) Guided-missile destroyer USS Gonzalez (DDG 66) transits the Atlantic Ocean. Gonzalez is deployed with the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class P. Sena/USN

MARINE CORPS:

A Marine Corps MV-22 Osprey assigned to Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force-Crisis Response-Central Command stages on a hasty landing zone during a tactical recovery of aircraft and personnel drill at an undisclosed location in Southwest Asia, Nov. 16, 2015.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo by Lance Cpl. Clarence Leake/USMC

Marines with the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit jump off the side of the USS Essex during a swim call. The Marines and sailors of the 15th MEU and Essex Amphibious Ready Group jumped 30-feet into the water and swam to their respective checkpoint.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo by Cpl. Elize McKelvey/USMC

COAST GUARD:

Since 1998 U.S. Coast Guard Air Station Atlantic City has stood the watch!

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Dave Froehlich/USCG

In 1984, HH-65A Dolphin helicopters were accepted into service. Today we use MH-65D Dolphin helicopters.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo: USCG

NOW: More awesome military photos

OR: These vintage photos prove the military has always worked hard (and Played harder)

MIGHTY CULTURE

7 epic photos from our enemies’ Instagram feeds

We have a history of showing off American military hardware, training, and photos. But we’re not always great about showing the great photographic work of our rivals. (Our “enemies” if you’re feeling aggressive or if you need to make your headline more click-baitey.)


So, we just took a quick walk through the Instagram feeds of the Chinese and Russian militaries as well as their senior leaders and found these seven epic photos that show off their hardware, troops, training, and celebrations.

Because they’re coming from Instagram and we don’t have the rights to download the images and upload them raw, you’ll also see the captions the photos were shared with. Lucky us, the Russian military includes English captions on their photos. The Russian caption comes before the English one, so just scroll until you see some familiar letters.

[instagram https://www.instagram.com/p/Bh-VBjxn5vj/?utm_source=ig_web_button_share_sheet expand=1]Chinese Armed Forces on Instagram: “We serve China! – People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF) Su-30MKK – #中国 #中华人民共和国 #中国人民解放军 #中国人民解放军空军 #中国武装力量 #中华人民共和国武装力量 #plaaf…”

www.instagram.com

This Su-30MKK is an export variant of Russia’s Sukhoi Su-30. It’s flown by the China’s People’s Liberation Army Air Force and is a capable fourth-generation fighter. It’s primarily used to protect from other fighters or to conduct strikes against targets on the ground like an F-15 does.

[instagram https://www.instagram.com/p/B0GHMPIAG5L/?utm_source=ig_web_button_share_sheet expand=1]Минобороны России on Instagram: “До Дня ВМФ чуть больше недели, а морпехи Тихоокеанского флота уже целый месяц репетируют эпизоды шоу, которое состоится во Владивостоке в…”

www.instagram.com

These armored personnel carriers are Russian BTR-82As. They can race along the ground at about 62 mph and have only been in service since the end of 2009. A three-person crew is needed to operate the vehicle, and seven more can ride in the back. It boasts a 30mm auto-cannon as well as a 7.62mm machine gun.

[instagram https://www.instagram.com/p/B0Akdy7ge8o/?utm_source=ig_web_button_share_sheet expand=1]Минобороны России on Instagram: “Удивительные кадры первых репетиций Главного военно-морского парада, посвященного Дню ВМФ, прошедших вчера в Санкт-Петербурге. В…”

www.instagram.com

A Russian helicopter, most likely the Mi-17, flies over St. Petersburg during rehearsals for a national holiday. Russia’s transport helicopters are some of the best in the world, and their attack helicopters have gotten better and better as well, though the most-modern Apaches and Vipers can likely still clear the sky.

[instagram https://www.instagram.com/p/BzS_LkwpVoL/?utm_source=ig_web_button_share_sheet expand=1]Instagram post by General Zhuang Dingman • Jun 29, 2019 at 2:15pm UTC

www.instagram.com

Chinese troops lift tires filled with water and dump them on themselves. The general who shared this image provided no context, but displays like this are common for Chinese troops, especially special operators, when cameras are nearby to capture the moment.

That may make it sound like these troops are just photo models, but China’s special operators have actually placed highly at recent Warrior Competitions in Jordan, taking first and third in 2017 and second in 2018.

[instagram https://www.instagram.com/p/B0gSJnOgC-y/?utm_source=ig_web_button_share_sheet expand=1]Минобороны России on Instagram: “Небо Москвы вчера озарили 2500 фейерверков в честь 75-ой годовщины освобождения Бреста от немецко-фашистских захватчиков ⠀ Брест был…”

www.instagram.com

The Russian government and its citizens celebrate the liberation of Brest, Belarus, during a party in Moscow. Brest was one of the first Russian cities lost during the German invasion in World War II but Russia re-took the city in 1944, 75 years ago.

[instagram https://www.instagram.com/p/BvpAt8NgtSy/?utm_source=ig_web_button_share_sheet expand=1]General Zhuang Dingman on Instagram: “Airmen erect air-defense missiles!!!!!”

www.instagram.com

Chinese troops prepare to erect an air defense missile. China has a wide selection of air defense missiles including S-300 and S-400 missiles imported from Russia as well as domestically built HQ-9 and HQ-22 missiles.

There’s some speculation about how much technology China might have reverse-engineered from Russia without permission, but the HQ-9, at least, was first deployed before China got access to Russian air defense missiles.

Articles

The Marines ditch crunches, go to planks for their annual fitness test

More articles from Military.com:

The Marine Corps has announced it will be phasing out crunches as part of its annual physical fitness test as part of a larger overhaul of the assessment.

Crunches will be replaced by planks — which were added as an option in 2019 — as the mandatory abdominal strength test in 2023, the service announced in a message Thursday.

The Marines will join the Navy in phasing out crunches as part of its fitness testing regimen. The Navy eliminated the exercise for the 2021 cycle of its test.

The exercise was first introduced in 1997 as part of the fitness test, though the test itself goes back to the early 1900s.

According to Marine Corps spokesman Capt. Sam Stephenson, injury prevention is a major force behind the change.Advertisement

“Research has shown that crunches with the feet restrained require significant hip flexor activation,” Stephenson explained in a statement.

“This has been linked to an increased risk of injury, including lower back pain,” he added.

Marines will be expected to perform a forearm plank – an exercise where the body is held in a push-up-like position while being supported by the forearms, elbows, and toes.

Additionally, the plank has “numerous advantages as an abdominal exercise,” according to the Marines. The exercise “activates almost twice as many muscles as the crunch and has been proven to be most reliable in measuring the true endurance required for daily activity function,” Stephenson said.

The changes announced Thursday also tweak the minimum and maximum times for the plank exercise. The maximum time will go from 4:20 to 3:45, while the minimum will change from 1:03 to 1:10. This change will take effect in 2022.

The Marines said its “human performance policies and standards are in a constant state of analysis, assessment, and modification, if necessary, to ensure that they best support the overall readiness of the force” in a message announcing the new standards.

This article originally appeared on Military.com. Follow @militarydotcom on Twitter.

Articles

These vets brew Semper Fi PA and Jet Noise

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years


Army National Guard Veteran, Tom Wilder, and Army Reserves Veteran, Neil McCannon, set out to build an empire of home-brewed beer in their hometown of Virginia Beach, VA in 2012. After successfully crowd funding their endeavor via Kickstarter, Tom and Neil were delighted to open their doors for business roughly 18 months ago, making them among the first veteran-owned breweries by vets, for vets.

What makes them special is the idea behind their brewery and how frequently they give back to their own community.

“For Young Veterans Brewing Company brewing is about love,” Tom said. “Since our first batch, we have been delighted by the artistry of the process and the creativity of recipe development and perfection. We are captivated by the detail and scientific precision required during the production and maturation processes. Mostly though, we love the joy we provide with our distinctive, high quality beer.”

Tom and Neil began experimenting after a stint as roommates.

“We lived together in a house together with like six other people in our twenties,” Neil said. “We had a home brew kit brought over and we made it together; it was a brown ale and it turned out well. If it hadn’t turned out better than we expected, I don’t think we would have continued.”

“The military has played a pivotal role in both our lives, shaping us as men and as citizens. Combined with our love of craft beer and experience in home-brewing these last five years, our idea took shape and we are ready to begin our new careers as small business owners and as brewers.” — Neil McCannon

This set them apart from most home brewers because they began experimenting shortly after their third batch whereas many will brew from standard kits.

“When you first start home brewing, they supply you with basically everything you need to brew beer,” Tom said. “After the third one we basically said screw the kit and began experimenting on our own, becoming addicted to brewing.”

In opening the brewery, the name was the easy part. Tom and Neil are natives of the area and both served in the military.

“To us, Young Veterans is where we’re from,” Neil explained. “We’re vets and we wanted to open our own business. We’re making a call to where we’re from, and the name was the easy answer. We do have a lot of focus on veterans charities and the military because it meant a lot to us. It was something [the military] we wanted to keep in our lives.”

“We were really worried that someone was going to steal our idea because we were YVBC about two years before we opened,” Tom said. “It would have been easy for someone to come in with a decent amount money and say, ‘Nice name’ and take off with it. We’re lucky that didn’t happen. We were very much among the first of veteran-themed breweries to pop up and shortly after we opened, Veterans Brewing popped up in Chicago, who is a high-volume, money making contract brewery. It puts pressure on us to stand out.”

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years

Originally, the two were looking to start a grandiose brewery with a large concert space and a tap room, but after considering the options they had in regard to venue size, budget and production, Tom and Neil opened a small brewery near Oceana Naval Base in Virginia Beach, completing their transition from home brewers to brewery owners.

Tom explained that in order to get their feet on the ground Neil attended the Siebel Institute in Chicago and Munich and obtained an International Degree in Brewing Science last year to further their goal and his knowledge as a brewer and Tom gained experience working in multiple facets of a distributing company.”

Today, they can barely keep up with the foot traffic from their 40/60 military to civilian customer base and are looking to expand. They recently found that they’ll be sharing the area with a veterans service group just up the street. Several of YVBC’s craft beers have become a staple in the Hampton Roads community, even traveling to other venues for “steal the taps” events in the area. The tap room features a membership club called ‘Canteen Command’ with military themed swag and a personalized mug that allows members to drink unreleased brews before they debut to the general public.

The duo is known for a variety of incredible brews with catchy names and nostalgic labels like “Pineapple Grenade,” “Jet Noise,” “Semper F.I.P.A.,” “Night Vision,” “New Recruit,” “DD-214,” and “Big Red Rye.” For more information about Tom, Neil and the gang at YVBC, they can be found at yvbc.com or on Instagram: @YVBC.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Brittany Slay is the Editor of American Veteran Magazine and a US Navy veteran, completing a 9 month deployment to Bahrain in 2014. She’s a fan of dark humor and enjoys writing, visiting breweries, and meeting people.

And check out American Veteran Magazine at amvets.magloft.com.

 

Now: 6 pieces of gear you won’t believe the military used 

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Cocaine bust highlights growing Air Force role in Southern hemisphere

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
U.S. Air Force E-3 Sentry AWACS, an RC-135, and KC-135s sit at the CURACAO/ARUBA Cooperative Security Location. | Photo via SOUTHCOM.


The line of cocaine the Air Force and Joint Interagency Task Force-South seized last month in the Caribbean would stretch “from the Pentagon to the center of Philadelphia.”

The Air Force’s top civilian shared that detail with reporters Wednesday when describing how the service is working harder to train pilots in the Southern hemisphere while aiding the global anti-drug war.

Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James said the service is looking for ways to use more assets in the Southern Command region that would be “of training benefit to our forces, but also contributing to counter drug and counter transnational crime commission.”

“The idea of all of this was to see if we could get more of a double ‘bang for your buck,’ ” James said at a Pentagon briefing.

And during a five-day training operation, they did.

Led by Air Force Lt. Gen. Chris Nowland, commander of the 12th Air Force and Air Forces Southern, the service and the Key West, Florida-based task force seized 6,100 kilograms (13,448 pounds) of cocaine between Aug. 22-26, James said.

The large-scale air operation in the Caribbean included a number of U.S. aircraft, including HC-130s, DH-8s, B-1Bs, B-52s, AWACS, JSTARS, Global Hawks, KC-135s and KC-10s, James said. Space and cyber assets “were also brought into the mix,” she said, but didn’t elaborate.

The use of airpower as well as the other partners in the interagency effort led to the seizure of as much as $500 million worth of the cocaine and the arrest of 17 drug traffickers by appropriate authorities, James said.

In March, a B-1B Lancer flew a low pass over a drug smuggling boat in the Caribbean Sea, prompting those onboard to dump 500 kilos of cocaine into the deep blue.

The secretary visited command units in April to discuss the potential for more training operations in Latin America.

Articles

27 gorgeous photos of life in the US Navy

From foreign ports to polar explorations, life at sea is an adventure.


Out of all the service branches, the Navy requires the most traveling from its troops. Life at sea is anything but boring and the foreign port visits with your best friends are worth the long stretches of isolation.

Here are 27 amazing photos of life at sea:

1. Sailors conduct a swim call.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo: Mass Communication Specialists 3rd Class Bradley J. Gee/USN

2. USS Green Bay conducts amphibious operations.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo: Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Scott Barnes/USN

3. USS Germantown conducts an amphibious assault exercise.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo: Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Patrick Dionne/USN

4.USS Ross conducts a replenishment-at-sea with USNS Leroy Grumman.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Weston Jones/USN

5. A Sea Hawk helicopter flies off the coast of Kauai.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo: Ensign Joseph Pfaff/USN

6. Divers participate in an International Mine Countermeasures Exercise.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Daniel Rolston/USN

7. Navy ships anchored in the waters of Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo: Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Daniel Barker/USN

8. An Uumanned underwater vehicle searches for mines.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo: Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Gary Keen/USN

9. A Royal Australian Navy ship pulls into the port of Dili to drop off members of Pacific Partnership.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo: Kristopher Radder/USN

10. Divers return to USS Anchorage during Exercise Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC).

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo: Electronics Technician 2nd Class Kimberly Leiter/USN

11. An X-47B unmanned aerial vehicle sits on an aircraft elevator.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo: Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tony D. Curtis/USN

12. USS Iwo Jima holds a swim call.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo: Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Megan Anuci/USN

13. Jets fly in formation during an air power demonstration.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Carlos M. Vazquez II/USN

14. A Sailor prepares for a live-fire exercise.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo: Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Collin Turner/USN

15. USS Cape St. George transits Pearl Harbor.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo: Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Daniel Barker/USN

16. USS Peleliu conducts a swim call.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo: Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Alex Van’tLeven/USN

17. An Amphibious vessel delivers supplies during humanitarian assistance effort.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo: Mass Communication Specialist Seaman John Grandin/USN

18. The USS Georgia prepares to moor in Diego Garcia.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo: Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Chris Williamson/USN

19. Sailors run on the flight deck of USS George H.W. Bush.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo: Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tony D. Curtis/USN

20. The USS Connecticut surfaces through the ice during an exercise.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo: Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kevin S. O’Brien

21. Military and civilian personnel participate in Pacific Partnership 2011.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo: Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Michael Russell/USN

22. USS John C. Stennis conducts helicopter operations.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo: Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Ignacio D. Perez/USN

23. Navy divers recover the Orion crew module.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo: Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Gary Keen

24. Sailors conduct morning colors aboard the USS Monterey.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo: Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Billy Ho/USN

25. Basic Underwater Demolition (BUD/S) candidates participate in Surf Passage.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo: Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Michael Russell/USN

26. A cruiser in the Arabian Gulf.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo: Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Walter M. Wayman

27. USS Mitscher (DDG 57) lights up its mast during night deck landing qualifications.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo: Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Anthony R. Martinez/USN

MIGHTY CULTURE

The best Cyber Monday discounts every veteran needs

Cyber Monday might not be as fun this year, since we’ve all been shopping online all year, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t some seriously steep discounts available on everything from new gear to new tech. Tackle your holiday shopping list or just treat yourself to something new with this list of discounts every veteran needs. 

Clothing and Apparel

Cozy up with new jeans, sweaters or socks to keep you warm through the long winter. Or, treat yourself to a new gym outfit so you don’t feel too guilty about that second slice of pie. Round out your shopping spree with a new pair of sneakers or dream big and buy a pair of heels for when the world reopens. 

7 for All Mankind: up to 40% off sitewide 

Amazon: Up to 30% off women’s seasonal trends, sunglasses and Sperry boots 

Gymshark: Take up to 50% off select collections

Happy Socks: 60% off select styles 

Zappos: up to 50% off sneakers, backpacks, and winter apparel

Fitness and Wellness

New Year, New You deserves new gear! Grab a subscription to Audible and get the latest books delivered right to your device. Crush your at home workout goals with a set of weighted bangles. Step up your steps with a new Fitbit. Then, when you’re ready to relax, snuggle in with a weighted blanket while your new air purifier makes the air crisp and clean. 

Audible Plus: 38% off first 6 months

Bala Weighted Bangle Set, $8 off

Fitbit sale: up to $50 off 

Dyson Pure Hot + Cold Air Purifier, up to 30% off at Bed Bath and Beyond 

Gravity Weighted Blanket, $30 off select styles 

Theragun Mini Therapy Massager, 10% off 

Tech 

Cyber Monday is all about the tech deals, and with good reason. This year, retailers are offering everything from steep discounts on gaming consoles to laptops. Work from Home just got a whole lot better with a brand new device. Speaking of devices, Verizon is offering crazy good deals on Monday on all of their phones and tables. Check out their website for full details. 

Alexa devices: all Alexa devices now from $9 at Amazon

Chromebooks: deals from $129

Dell: laptop deals from $349

Galaxy S20/Note 20 sale: up to $250 off 

HP sale: up to 65% off all laptops 

Lenovo: ThinkPad sale from $799

Microsoft: up to $900 off Surface, Xbox, more

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Just because you’ve been shopping from your couch since March doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy Cyber Monday in style.

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This WWII bomber was finally found after 70 years

Nearly 74 years ago, in the skies over Hansa Bay on the northern coast of Papua New Guinea, 2nd Lieutenant Thomas V. Kelly, Jr. was crewing a B-24 bomber named “Heaven Can Wait.” He and ten other crewmen were on a mission to destroy Japanese anti-aircraft batteries when, suddenly, his aircraft was struck, sending it crashing into the ocean below.

The wreckage and those on board were lost to the sea — until May 2018.


The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years

The crew of “Heaven Can Wait.” 2nd Lt. Thomas V. Kelly is pictured in the center, top row.

(Project Recover)

On that fateful day, March 11th, 1944, 2nd Lt. Kelly’s struggle ended — but for those he had left behind back home, it had just begun. Wracked with grief and left without closure, his family pieced together whatever information they could find — eyewitness accounts from military reports, mission documents, diary entries, etc. — to try and better understand. But without help, there would be no conclusion. That’s when Project Recover got involved.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years

Project Recover makes uses of the most sophisticated underwater imaging technology to find the once-unrecoverable.

(Project Recover)

Project Recover was established 2012 with the goal of locating the underwater resting places of the 72,000 Americans that have gone missing in action since World War II. Through a partnership between the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego, the University of Delaware College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment, and the BentProp Project, the organization uses sophisticated, modern technologies to find those once deemed unrecoverable.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years

The northern end of Hansa Bay, Papua New Guinea.

(Project Recover)

Upon receiving the compiled evidence, Project Recover set out to Papau New Guinea in October 2017, with aims of searching for 5 sunken U.S. aircraft that accounted for 24 MIA. After carefully reviewing the documents and conducting an archaeological study, the team determined that “Heaven Can Wait” was resting somewhere in the north end of Hansa Bay.

It was there, after 11 days of searching across 27 square kilometers of sea floor, that they found her under 213 feet of water.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years

What remained of “Heaven Can Wait”

(Project Recover)

“This is an important step toward our ultimate goal of identifying and returning home the crew of “Heaven Can Wait” who bravely served our country,” said Dan Friedkin, a member of Project Recover and CEO of The Friedkin Group, whose substantial contribution to the Project made the trip to Papau New Guinea possible.

Since their discovery, a process has begun with the U.S. government to, hopefully, recover and identify the remains of the up to 11 crew members aboard “Heaven Can Wait.” In the last five months, there have been three repatriation ceremonies for veterans who served in World War II — all of which are a direct result of Project Recovery’s work — but much remains to be done.

Dan Friedkin stated, with determination, that the organization’s “search efforts for the more than 72,000 missing American service members from World War II will continue.”

For more about Project Recover, be sure to visit their website. For all the details on the amazing story surrounding the recovery of “Heaven Can Wait,” watch the video below.

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This is how a decorated PJ found ‘love at first sight’ after he retired

“Just be quiet for a second. You hear that?” retired Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Rob Disney asks a visitor. When she nods, he says, “Absolutely nothing. That’s what I love the most about this place.”


Disney’s life wasn’t always so tranquil. A 21-year pararescueman in the Air Force, Disney was often being sent in when Army Green Berets, Marine Force Recon, or Navy SEALs had gotten into a situation where they couldn’t get out without help.

During one of his deployments Disney was shot in the face with an AK-47 and lost all feeling in his face for several months. Disney received the Purple Heart for his injury and has a host of awards to show for his bravery.

But to help those combat memories fade, Disney bought an amazing mountain retreat after retirement, saying it was “love at first sight,” with the deal being sealed when he went out on the porch with a cup of coffee.

“It definitely was my destiny,” Disney told the host of the video. The house, built with both log and drywall, has three bedrooms and a finished basement. While the house in the mountains may have been Disney’s destiny, it’s not the first house Disney has owned. The experience of buying homes and closing “quite a few mortgages” during his 21 years of service has given him some valuable insights.

“Something that is very very important in anybody who is going to buy a home is that they need to find a mortgage company that they can absolutely trust and have a rock-solid foundation with,” Disney said, adding that Veterans First was the one he trusted most.

Disney closed on his house of destiny 13 years to the day after he was shot, and moved there exactly a year later.

“I took one of the worst experiences of my life and turned it into one of my best memories,” he said.

Disney also demonstrated some guitar skills. He started playing at age 15, shifting from the banjo, which didn’t attract the attention he sought from girls.

“Still play all the time, every day,” he said, describing it as an emotional release.

The full video from Veterans First mortgage is embedded above.

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Watch this year’s Marine Corps birthday message celebrating 240 years of service

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years


The Marine Corps’ top leaders are wishing Marines everywhere a happy 240th birthday in a new video released on Oct. 23.

Though the nearly 10-minute video is a bit early — the Marines’ birthday isn’t until Nov. 10 — the video message from the Commandant and Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps have become a staple of the Corps in recent years.

This year is no different, with a message from new Commandant Gen. Robert Neller and Sgt. Maj. Ronald Green filmed at Marine Barracks Washington, D.C.

“We hope each of you will have a chance to reflect on our history, remember those who sacrificed and reaffirm your commitment to the strengthening of our Corps,” Neller says in the video.

The video features interviews with other Marines, along with historical footage from past battles, including The Battle of Iwo Jima, which was fought 70 years ago.

“Happy birthday Marines, wherever you are. … We must continue to uphold the legacy of those who have gone before, and we remain Semper Fidelis,” Neller says in closing, using the Marine Corps Latin motto, meaning “Always Faithful.”

Watch:

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The Military Took These Incredible Photos In Just One Week-Long Period

The military has very talented photographers in the ranks, and they constantly attempt to capture what life as a service member is like during training and at war. Here is the best of what they shot this week:


AIR FORCE

F-16 Fighting Falcons taxi down the runway March 3, 2015, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The F-16s are assigned to the 18th Aggressor Squadron at Eielson AFB. Aggressor pilots returned after completing a mobile training team exercise.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo: Senior Airman Peter Reft/USAF

Pilots in an F-15E Strike Eagle receive fuel from a New Hampshire Air National Guard KC-135R Stratotanker March 17, 2015, over North Carolina. The pilots and F-15E aircraft are from Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, N.C.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo: Airman Ashlyn J. Correia/USAF

NAVY

Sailors aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) heave line during an underway replenishment and ammunition onload with the Military Sealift Command fast combat support ship USNS Arctic (T-AOE 8). Theodore Roosevelt deployed from Norfolk and will execute a homeport shift to San Diego at the conclusion of deployment.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo: Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Anthony Hopkins/USN

EAST CHINA SEA (March 17, 2015) Sailors assigned to the amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) and Marines assigned to the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (31st MEU) taxi an AV-8B Harrier assigned to Marine Attack Squadron (VMA) 238.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo: Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Matthew Dickinson/USN

ARMY

Army paratroopers, assigned to 1st Battalion (Airborne), 503rd Infantry Regiment, 173rd Airborne Brigade, sit in the door of a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter as it lifts off. The airborne operation held March 19, 2015 at Grafenwoehr, Germany, is the final preparation for the unit before they conduct multinational exercises across Europe.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo: 2nd Lt. Steven Siberski/US Army

Bach, a military working dog, takes down an Army military policeman during a demonstration at Fort Sill, Okla., March 12, 2015. The demonstration showed how Fort Sill’s K9 Unit assists with searches for narcotics, explosives and assists in apprehending suspects.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo: Marie Berberea/US Army

MARINE CORPS

Marines with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unitconduct a daytime boat operation exercise using Combat Rubber Raiding Crafts as part of amphibious integration training aboard the USS Green Bay, at sea, March 11, 2015. The Marines and sailors are currently conducting their spring patrol of the Asia-Pacific region.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo: Gunnery Sgt. Ismael Pena/USMC

Marines with 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit conduct a nighttime boat operation exercise using a Combat Rubber Raiding Craft as part of amphibious integration training aboard the USS Green Bay, at sea, March 11, 2015. The Marines and sailors are currently conducting their spring patrol of the Asia-Pacific region.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo: Gunnery Sgt. Ismael Pena/USMC

COAST GUARD

Petty Officer 1st Class Denis Butierries holds his son Jacob so he can get a view of Honolulu Harbor during a tour of the Coast Guard Cutter Rush Dec. 23. 2014. Six-year-old Jacob was diagnosed with spinal muscular atrophy when he was four months old and was given between four months and one year to live. His longtime wish was to see the Rush where his grandfather served as the engineering officer.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo: Chief Petty Officer Kurt Fredrickson/USCG

Coast Guard Station Golden Gate lifeboat crews conduct surf training in Sausalito, Calif., Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014. The crews train in high surf to ensure they are prepared to respond to any maritime emergency during rough weather conditions.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Photo: Petty Officer 3rd Class Loumania Stewart/USCG

NOW: This Is What It Was Like To Feel Zero G Aboard NASA’s ‘Vomit Comet’

AND: Meet The Marine Veteran Who’s Going To Be Star Wars’ Next Villian

OR WATCH: The Most Evil Weapons Ever Created

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The Pentagon and Silicon Valley are at odds over AI weapons

The Pentagon, via the latest National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), is seeking $12-15 million to develop weapons which would select and engage targets without human intervention. The people who develop artificial intelligence think it’s possible that such weapons will exist within years instead of decades, including “armed quadcopters that can search for and eliminate people meeting certain pre-defined criteria.” And those developers aren’t thrilled about it one bit.


The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Neither was Captain America, but I’m pretty sure he took care of the whole problem.

Current AI technology is built on the premise of human non-intervention. For example, on Patriot missile batteries, the automated system will select and destroy a target unless the user opts out, which can have disastrous consequences, especially for friendly fighter pilots trying not to die from Patriot missile attacks, because the AI isn’t always as smart as we like to think it is.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Willie sees you. Willie don’ care.

So with a current fail-safe system less secure than an iTunes gift card, why don’t American lawmakers and generals try to take a hint about the”AI Arms Race” from the most trusted, brilliant, and influential nerds who trying to warn us? Nerds like Stephen Hawking, Elon Musk, and Steve Wozniak?

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
This pretty much sums it up.

The Defense Department says it’s to make the human more effective in combat. Because as anyone who’s ever lost their mobile phone knows, having all your numbers stored under names like “Josie Drunk Girl” and “Do Not Answer” makes your memory soooooooo much better.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
Technology!

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years
ANALYSIS COMPLETE

But the list goes on. According to Deputy Defense Secretary Robert Work, the new technologies the Pentagon wants to develop will allow commanders to identify and analyze enemy defenses.

Further technological innovations would include wearable electronics, exoskeletons, greater use of drones and manned aircraft working together, and mother ships that would send out mini-drones to execute military missions, all of which could incorporate AI.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years

The announcement comes not just against the urging of America’s tech mogul community, but also amid skepticism from within the Defense Department’s own ranks, presumably until Deputy Secretary Work actually told a packed conference at the Center for a New American Security the DoD wants to be able to “kick the crap out of people who grew up under an authoritarian reign,” at which point, I imagine they erupted in cheers and then partied like a group of tailgating Buffalo Bills fans.

The B-52 Stratofortress may stay in the Air Force for 100 years

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