11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant) - We Are The Mighty
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11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

Joining the military is a life-changing decision that begins at the recruiter’s office, but he or she isn’t always forthcoming with the full deal, as we say.


While some military recruiters are helpful and consider themselves life coaches rather than a salesmen, they are all under pressure to meet their quotas.

These are 11 things recruiters might tell you, (along with what they’re really saying):

1. You’ll travel to exotic places.

 

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

This may be true but your definition of “exotic location” may be different than a recruiter’s definition. The word “exotic” may evoke imagery of Hawaii, when the recruiter really means Afghanistan. Where you may travel also depends heavily on which branch of service you join and what job you get.

2. Don’t want to be in combat? There are plenty of non-combat jobs available.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
 
Having a non-combat job does not mean you will not be deployed to a combat zone. It simply means your chances of seeing combat are much less.

3. You can go to college while on active duty.

 

This is technically true but it can often be very difficult completing classes due to deployments, training schedules, and your unit operational tempo.

4. You have a good ASVAB score so you’ll get a good job.

 
11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
 
While having a good ASVAB (Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery) test score can qualify you for specific jobs, it does not actually guarantee you anything. Make sure you get it in writing.

5. You only serve for 4 years.

While your initial active duty enlistment contract can vary in years (3, 4, 6) it is important to know that your inactive service time can extend much further. For example, A typical 4 year active duty enlistment normally includes another 4 year inactive ready reserve obligation. What that means is, once you get out, there is a small chance that you can be pulled back in.

6. Your job is guaranteed.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

The job you sign up for is one of the most critical decisions you make so it’s important you get it guaranteed in your contract. However, your job is only guaranteed if you make it through all your initial training successfully. Should you fail or get into disciplinary trouble, your job can change and it will be at your branch’s discretion, not yours.

Just because you have Navy SEAL on your contract doesn’t mean you are guaranteed to be one.

7. You will get a wish list of bases to get stationed at.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

Chances are you will be able to send in a wish list of bases to be stationed at but it does not guarantee anything. In regards to this, you’ll likely hear “needs of the Marine Corps” or “needs of the Army” if you ask why you didn’t get what you wanted.

8. Your military school credits will transfer over to a college.

This can be true, but this often heavily depends on the job you choose and if the college you are attending is military-friendly and accepts those credits.

9. Your military job skills translate directly to civilian job skills.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

 

The skills you learn as a mortarman, cook, and many others may not translate directly to a post service career, but chances are you learned many skills that will. Leadership, initiative, work ethic, responsibility, and team work are examples of general skills all military service members acquire.  Fortunately, there are also careers that give military preference.

10. You can get bonus money.

Sure, the bonus money is great but it’s being offered for a reason. It’s possible the job may not be desirable or the contract length may be longer. Make sure you fully understand all that is required to receive it.

11. There’s a waiver for everything.

Getting a waiver for something that would otherwise disqualify you for military service is possible. However, the likelihood of you getting one is dependent on how bad the branch of service needs new recruits. Currently, it is getting much harder to join the military.

BONUS: You will become a better person.

 

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

 

For the majority of veterans, this is 100% true.

NOW: 9 reasons candidates are disqualified from military service

OR: The 7 funniest Yelp reviews for military bases

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23 terms only fighter pilots understand

If you’ve ever hung out with military aviators (or watched movies like “Top Gun” or “Iron Eagle”) you know they tend to use a lot of strange lingo when they talk, even when they’re out of the cockpit. Trying to hold a conversation with them can be tough — until now. WATM presents this handy list of fighter speak that will help keep that social interaction going, which is important because fighter guys have a lot of wisdom to put out and it would be a shame if it got lost in translation.


So here’s the gouge . . . er, here you go:

1. “Angels”

 

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
U.S. Navy photo by Lt. Greg Linderman

Altitude in thousand of feet. (“Angels 3” is 3,000 feet.)

2. “Cherubs”

Altitude in hundreds of feet. (“Cherubs 3” is 300 feet.)

3. “Bandit”

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
An air-to-air right side view of a Soviet MiG-31 Foxhound aircraft.

A known bad guy.

4. “Bogey”

An unknown radar contact.

5. “Bent”

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

 

If a piece of gear is inop it is “bent.” (“Giantkiller, be advised my radar is bent.”)

6. “Bingo”

Low fuel status or direction to head for the divert field. (“Lobo is bingo fuel,” or “Ghostrider, your signal is bingo.”)

7. “Blind”

Wingman not in sight.

8. “Delta”

Change to a later time, either minutes or hours depending on the context. (“Delta 10 on your recovery time” means the jet is now scheduled to land 10 minutes later.)

9. “Firewall”

Push the throttles to their forward limit. (“I had that bitch firewalled, and I still couldn’t get away from that SAM ring.”)

10. “Buster”

Direction to go as fast as possible. (“Diamondback, your signal is buster to mother.”)

11. “Bug”

Exit a dogfight rapidly. (“Gucci is on the bug.”)

12. “Fragged”

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Air Force ordies load a training GBU (recognizable by its blue color). (U.S. Air Force photo)

 

An indication that the airplane is loaded weapons-wise according to the mission order. (“Devil 201 is on station as fragged.”)

13. “Grape”

A pilot who’s an easy kill in a dogfight.

14. “Naked”

Radar warning gear without indication of a missile threat.

15. “Punch out”

To eject from an airplane.

16. “RTB”

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Dana Rosso

Return to base. (“Big Eye, Eagle 301 is RTB.”)

17. “Spiked”

Um, not that “spike.” The real “spiked” is an indication of a missile threat on the radar warning receiver. (“Rooster has an SA-6 spike at three o’clock.”)

18. “Tally”

Enemy in sight (as opposed to “visual,” which means friendly in sight). (“Nuke is tally two bandits, four o’clock low.”)

19. “Texaco”

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Mary O’Dell

Either a label for the tanker or direction to go to the tanker. (“Gypsy, Texaco is at your one o’clock for three miles, level,” or “Gypsy, your signal is Texaco.”)

20. “Nose hot/cold”

Usually used around the tanker pattern, an indication that the radar is or isn’t transmitting.

21. “Vapes”

The condensation cloud created when an airplane pulls a lot of Gs. (“Man, I came into the break and was vaping like a big dog.”)

22. “Visual”

Wingman (or other friendly) in sight (as opposed to “tally,” which means enemy in sight). (“Weezer, you got me?” “Roger, Weezer is visual.”)

23. “Winchester”

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jared Becker

Out of weapons. (“Tomcat 102 is winchester and RTB.”)

Bonus 1: “G-LOC”

“G-induced loss of consciousness.” (Not good when at the controls of a fighter traveling at high speed at low altitude.)

Bonus 2. “The Funky Chicken”

“The Funky Chicken” is what aviators call the involuntary movements that happen during G-LOC.

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7 features that would make military games more realistic

Look, video games are awesome and military video games are doubly so. But video game companies are not even trying to capture real deployed life. As they continue bragging about their realistic sound effects and HD graphics, here are 9 features that would actually help gamers get a real combat experience.


1. Make players rehearse a mission four times and then send them on a different one.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Photo: US Army Sgt. Joseph Guenther

The player is briefed on a mission to capture or kill a high-value target. They have to watch a rehearsal on a sand table, then practice in an open field, and finally they assault some fake buildings with their squad to be sure everyone is on the same page.

They climb onto the birds but halfway to the target are diverted to capture an undefended dam before terrorists can blow it up. The player’s squad defends it for three days against nothing before returning to base. A friendly engineer squad then blows up the dam.

2. All calls for fire take at least 10 minutes and miss the first three times.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Rockets aim at objective B, hit objective B on the first try. I’m calling B-S. Photo: Youtube

Artillery units rarely hit their target on the first try in the real world and even airstrikes have trouble getting it right a lot of times. Yet video games which allow a player to call in an airstrike always show rounds cascading down on the exact spot the player asks for.

Instead, the player should have to adjust fire over three or four iterations before actually killing anything. They should also have to wait at least 10 minutes from the first call until the fire mission is fired and rounds begin falling on the target.

3. Random mistakes by other members of your team.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Characters should fall over stuff like this guy did. But because they tripped, not because they died like this guy. Photo: Youtube

Every once in a while, a squad mate should get their gear stuck on a door handle, trip on their own rucksack strap, or slip on a wet spot in the ground and fall. The player has to decide whether to help their buddy or continue firing at the enemy while attempting to stifle their laughter.

4. Include a 40-lb haptic bodysuit that punches you when you’re shot.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Photo: US Army Maj. Penny Zamora

When the player is going into battle, they’re usually wearing a hoodie, some boxers, and a fine layer of chip crumbs. But soldiers wear 40 pounds of armor plus whatever other gear they’re carrying at that moment. So, players should be given a vest that weighs as much as the armor.

As an added bonus, motors and weights could be used to punch the player where their character was just shot. And they could carry an 8-pound controller.

5. Your inventory always includes at least 3 items you’ll never use.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Photo: YouTube

The player should have a limited inventory space, some of which is taken up with “just-in-case” items that never get used. It could be gas masks, backup batteries, whatever. If the player tries to throw them away, the items show up on later patrols as booby traps.

6. Weapon misfires

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Photo: US Army Spc. Marcus Floyd

Anytime the player crawls through mud or sand, it should increase the chance that their weapon misfires. Every 100 rounds without a cleaning should increase the chance of a misfire as well.

7. Can only level up after passing a PT test and reciting random facts from memory

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

After the player completes a few missions while exhausted from the countless rehearsals in the heavy bodysuit, overcomes misfires at critical moments, and has proven their ability to carry around useless equipment, they should be given the opportunity to level up.

To get selected for the higher level, they just have to score in at least the 80th percentile on a physical training test and recite the muzzle velocities of at least three weapons. Otherwise, the player is sent back to the tent to study. It doesn’t matter what their kill-to-death ratio is. Side note: KTD ratios are not a thing either.

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7 surprising things you didn’t know about Marine cooks

They’re few, they’re proud, they are Marines food service personnel (aka Marine cooks) tasked with providing satisfying sustenance to warfighters in every clime and place, but not many people know about them or their capabilities.


 

Related: 5 things boot Marines buy with their first paycheck

1. The Marine Corps has cooks.

That’s it… Most people are unaware of this. Marine occupational specialty MOS 3381 food service specialist — it’s a thing.

 

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Come n’ get some.

2. Marine cooks rarely work in chow halls.

Marine Corps chow halls are contracted to Sodexo, the same company that provides prisons with their food service. The similarities may not surprise you. While Marines will sometimes augment chow halls, deployment schedule and support to infantry units is the primary job of most 3381s.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Sgt. Eller stirring up some sh*t! (Photo by Marine Cpl. Timothy Childers)

3. They are the people you want to know.

Everyone eats, which means Marine cooks network with everyone. If you want to know a guy who knows a guy that can make whatever happen, the cook is the only friend you need.

4. They control the Rip-Its and coffee in-country.

On deployments, the cooks control the inventory and dispersion of rations – to include not only all the food, but the drinks as well. Imagine quad-cons full of Rip-Its and coffee drinks. Befriend the gatekeeper and you can all live like kings.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Quad Con looks good

5. They know the food isn’t always good.

Field rations are created to endure both high and low temperatures for extended periods of time without going bad. It is meant to provide calories, not so much taste. This is why so many condiments are made available.

If your Marine cook had the time and resources to put out Michelin-star cuisine, he would. But until that miracle of supply and tax dollars happens, blame only yourself for enlisting and suck up what’s available.

Also Read: 7 tips on how to get selected by MARSOC instructors

6. Some of them can cook really well.

There are multiple-day competitions held that involve both Marine and civilian teams competing for pride and prizes. These, along with inter-service competitions, have cultivated some real culinary talent among the ranks.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Marine chefs Christopher Brandle (left) and Quentin Reed (right).

7. Marine cooks work when you’re off.

You remember those mandatory fun days? You know, the ones where you had to show up to some lame cookout on a Saturday where officers and high enlisted wore polo shirts and above-the-knee khaki shorts with a braided belt and Oakleys? Yes?

Well, that guy cooking, cleaning, and serving the food has been there for hours and can’t leave until everything is cleaned up, the trash is taken out, the trucks are turned back in, and everything is squared away.

Not to mention the Marines stuck working in a chow hall seven days a week.

Bonus! They deploy as far forward as people who need to eat.

This is Sam in Herat province, Afghanistan… Sam is a United States Marine, 3381 food service specialist, living his dream.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
He makes some mean tacos when he’s not doing this. (Image via Sam Hodgeman)

Articles

15 Unforgettable Photos From Operation Desert Storm

Operation Desert Storm kicked off 24 years ago on Jan. 17, 1991.


The Gulf War officially lasted from August 2, 1990 to February 28, 1991. It consisted of two phases; Operation Desert Shield and Operation Desert Storm. Desert Shield was the codename used for the part leading to the buildup of troops and defense of Saudi Arabia and Desert Storm was the combat phase by the coalition forces against Iraq’s invasion of Kuwait.

15,000 Western civilians – including 3,000 Americans – living in Kuwait were rounded up and taken to Baghdad as hostages. In this YouTube screen capture, 5-year-old Briton, Stuart Lockwood refuses Saddam Hussein’s invitation to sit on his knee … Awkward.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Photo: YouTube

700,000 American troops were deployed to the war; that’s more than 2015’s entire population of Nashville, TN.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Photo: DVIDS

Desert Storm was the largest military alliance since World War II; 34 nations led by the United States waged war in response to Iraq’s invasion of Kuwait.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Photo: Wikimedia

American troops prepared for every scenario since Iraq was known for employing chemical weapons in the past.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Photo: DOD

Untested in combat, Desert Storm would be the first time the M1 Abrams tank saw action; 1,848 of them were deployed to the war.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Photo: Wikimedia

The Iraqi Army used T-55, T-62, and  T-72 tanks imported from the Soviet Union and Poland.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Photo: Wikimedia

But they were no match for U.S. forces.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Photo: Wikimedia

More than 1,000 military aircraft were deployed to the Gulf War.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Photo: Wikimedia

One of the key players in Desert Storm was the stealthy F-117 Nighthawk.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Photo: Wikimedia

Coalition forces flew over 100,000 sorties and dropped more than 88,500 tons of bombs.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Photo: Wikimedia

You can’t hit what you can’t see. Iraq’s anti-aircraft guns were useless against the F-117.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Photo: Wikimedia

Here’s the aftermath of a coalition attack along a road in the Euphrates River Valley…

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Photo: Wikimedia

The Gulf War was the last time the U.S. Navy used battleships in combat.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Photo: Wikimedia

The famous oil fires were a result of Iraq’s scorched earth policy –  destroy anything that might be useful to the enemy – as they retreated from Kuwait.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Photo: Wikimedia

737 oil wells were set on fire…

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Photo: Wikimedia

The following video is an hour-long BBC documentary of the Gulf War:

NOW: The Spectacular CIA Screwup That Probably Helped Iran Build A Nuke

AND: This Guy Kept Fighting The War For 30 Years After Japan Surrendered

Articles

7 military regs service members violate every day

Let’s face it, the military has a lot of rules and regulations that they expect everyone to follow to the letter. For the most part, service members abide by the guidelines their commands set for them, though there are some that push the boundaries any chance they get.


Even the most squared away troop has violated a military statute at one time or another because many of them are bull sh*t less important to the mission than others.

Check out our list of regulations that service members violate every day.

1. Hands in pockets

As crazy as it sounds, having your hands stuffed inside your warm pockets on a cold day isn’t allowed; it’s the military way — but we still do it.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

2. Fraternization

A consensual adult relationship between officers and enlisted members totally violates the Uniform Code of Military Justice, but it’s a lot of fun to brag about after you get out.

3. Adultery

Sleeping with someone who isn’t your spouse is just a d*ck move. But just because it’s not cool doesn’t mean it never happens.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

4. Wearing white socks

Although they’re more comfortable than wearing black socks with combat boots, don’t let the higher ups see you sporting the out-of-reg look.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

5. Hazing

Most service members prefer the term “hardcore training” — but for those enduring the tough discipline, it’s seen it as a negative thing.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

6. Contract marriages

Getting married strictly for monetary gain or medical benefits happens frequently, especially right before a deployment — it can turn south real quick.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

7. Walking & talking on a cell phone

For millennials, this is the biggest hurdle to jump over when they first enter military service.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

Bonus: Showing up to work drunk

Because service members like to drink.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

Can you think of any more? Leave a comment!

Articles

37 Awesome Photos Of Life On A US Navy Carrier

An aircraft carrier is like a small city at sea, except this city is armed to the teeth.


Onboard, thousands of sailors work, sleep, and play for months at a time while deployed around the world. But what’s life really like?

We rounded up 37 photos from our own collection and the Navy’s official Flickr page to give you an idea.

A day at sea begins with reveille — military-speak for “wake up” —  announced over the ship’s loudspeaker, known as the 1MC.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
 

Some sailors start their morning in one of the many cardio gyms onboard.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

While others hit the free weights.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

On any one of the mess decks, culinary specialists start preparing to feed the thousands of sailors that will show up for breakfast.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

And sailors file through the line and fuel up for the day ahead.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

On the flight deck, sailors need to be extra careful.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

The flight deck is the world’s most dangerous place to work.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

 

A step in the wrong direction could turn propellers into meat grinders.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

Jets launch around the clock.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

And darkness doesn’t slow them down.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

Sailors on the flight deck work in 12-hour shifts, seven days a week. As a former sailor myself, I can say we sometimes forget what day it is.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

Nights at sea are a stargazer’s dream.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

We fix planes in the hangar.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

We squeeze them into tight spots.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

Teamwork is essential.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

Together we can move planes.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

Even ships.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

No matter what, a buddy will always have your back.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

Work can be exhausting. Every sailor sleeps in a small space called a rack.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

But sailors quickly learn to sleep anywhere.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

Anywhere.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

Sometimes we get to dress like pirates to honor the long-standing tradition of “Crossing the Line.”

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

At the “Crossing the Line” ceremony Pollywogs endure physical hardships before being inducted into the mysteries of the deep.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

Only then can King Neptune and his royal court transform a slimy Pollywog into an honorable Shellback.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

This tradition is older than anyone can remember.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

Sometimes when we have downtime we go for a dip in the ocean.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

We play basketball in the hangar.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

Or volleyball.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

We sing on the flight deck.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

Or relax in the berthing – Navy speak for living quarters.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

The best part about being a sailor is traveling.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

We visit foreign ports.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

We play as hard as we work.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

Sometimes we visit places civilians will never see.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

We never forget our sacrifices.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

We honor traditions.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

And when we sail off into the sunset, we know tomorrow is a new adventure.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

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The 13 funniest military memes of the week

Mo’ memes, mo’ prob– wait, that’s not right. Whatever, check out our memes of the week. If you’ve got some great ones, bring them to our page and “Like” us while you’re there.


1. This is why you don’t sham near your unit (Via Team Non-Rec).

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Either hole up in the barracks or get way off post.

2. Maybe this is why Marines are so obsessed with pull ups (via Marine Corps Memes).

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
They’re not that challenging when you can fly.

SEE ALSO: Me as ‘vibe coordinator’ and other stories from military transition hell

3. Air Power (Via Team Non-Rec).

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Muscles developed through years of chair sitting.

4.  Just wish there was video of this (Via Sh*t My LPO Says).

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
It’d be even better if she slipped into some fuzzy slippers before walking off.

5. They’re very important tools.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Getting a drawing on the commander’s fridge is an automatic OER bullet.

6. The sound of freedom is a Rip-It can being opened.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Seriously, this might be the serum given to Capt. America.

7. Switches back and forth like a metronome (via Marine Corps Memes).

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Seriously, it’s like he’s a mole and getting to lance corporal is when he gets whacked.

8. Meh, it’ll be fine (Via Sh*t My LPO Says).

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
It looks like quality wood. What could go wrong?

9. “Why shouldn’t I be comfortable, chief?”

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Don’t worry. His hands will come out when he starts doing push ups.

10. Basic training is no reason to let yourself go.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

11. When your commander seems to have no experience (Via Air Force Memes and Humor)

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Of course, the rest of your unit is going to give you the same look if you really start talking about ribbon count.

 12. There’s nothing to do but climb trees (via Marine Corps Memes).

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Just kidding. If you climbed a tree, gunny would murder you.

13. V.A. care. Earned, not given (via Marine Corps Memes).

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
It’s a long quest to see a V.A. doctor, but at least you’ll get 800 mg ibuprofen and some water when you complete the ordeal.

NOW: The 8 most iconic Marine Corps recruiting slogans

AND: 11 steps to turning a puppy into a badass military working dog

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5 more common movie mistakes veterans can spot right away

When a veteran or active duty service member watches a movie that depicts life in the military, they automatically begin to look for flaws. With a little attention to detail, they can spot even the most subtle of goofs.


But even on the surface, there are some mistakes that Hollywood makes that can get pretty annoying — especially when it wouldn’t take much to get it right.

1. Radio etiquette

This is something that’s so simple that it’s frustrating when we see it done wrong. What most people don’t understand is that, in the military, using the word ‘repeat’ over the radio tells your fire support assets to repeat their mission. So, saying it is an absolute no-no unless, well, you want your destroyed target to be even more destroyed.

Aside from that, the proper response to a message over the radio is ‘roger,’ not ‘copy.’ The reason you would say ‘copy’ is if the messenger gave you the information that needed to copy down, such as map coordinates, headcounts, etc. If someone says, ‘stand-by,’ your response should be, “roger, standing by.”

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
You should also avoid cussing over the radio. Just saying. (Photo from Paramount Pictures’ Rules of Engagement)

2. Tactics

Since military tactics vary between countries and branches, this is somewhat excusable. But, for the most part, all countries understand the fundamentals: never enter a room or building alone, don’t stand in the open while being shot at, and don’t move without covering fire.

These things are so simple that it’s practically common sense. Going against these concepts is a really bad idea but, for some reason, filmmakers just don’t get it right.

3. Customs and courtesies

The military is known for the respect and discipline that’s instilled in every service member — you’d think it’d be pretty easy to capture in a movie.

But what seems to be misunderstood is that a lower enlisted does not call a general by their rank in a conversation. In fact, no one calls an officer by their rank — not even other officers. They’re referred to as, ‘sir.’ Only when being discussed in the third person are they referred to by rank.

The only case you would refer to an officer by their rank is if you need to get their attention. For example, you would say, “Lieutenant Parker, sir.” When they talk to you, end every sentence with, ‘sir.’

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Make sure you salute them correctly when the time comes, too. (Photo from 20th Century Fox’s The Marine)

4. Duty stations

If you’ve been deployed to Afghanistan or Iraq, you know about this. When someone on screen claims they were “stationed in Afghanistan” for four years or however long, it’s essentially the same as that one guy in the bar who claims they were a Marine scout-sniper Space Shuttle door gunner SEAL — it’s bullsh*t.

You may spend 9 months to a year in Afghanistan, but that’s not a duty station, it’s a deployment. This is something you can learn in a conversation with literally anyone who has been there.

5. Trigger discipline

This one should bother everyone. It’s pretty hard to believe someone on screen spent any amount of years in the service if they don’t know to keep their finger straight and off the trigger. Everyone learns this in boot camp — everyone.

This is even common sense in the hunting community or among anyone who has had even the most basic level of training on a firearm. That finger should NOT touch the trigger until you’re ready to unload some discontent toward a monster, alien, or person.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
A captain should know better… (Photo from United Artists’ Apocalypse Now)

Articles

5 American generals buried in more than one place

Sure, most people end up in one nice, consolidated grave. But these five generals were not “most people”:


1. Gen. “Mad” Anthony Wayne’s skeleton and flesh were buried 400 miles apart.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

When Isaac Wayne arrived at the Army blockhouse in Erie, Pennsylvania, he expected to exhume his father’s bones and take them the 400 miles back to his hometown of Radnor, Pennsylvania for re-burial. His father was Gen. “Mad” Anthony Wayne, a Revolutionary War and Northwest Indian War hero.

When the remains were exhumed, the body was found to be in good condition despite 12 years having passed since Gen. Wayne’s death in 1796. Isaac’s cart was too small to move a complete body though, and so Isaac had the body dismembered and the flesh boiled off of it. Then, he took the bones the 400 miles back to Radnor. The boiled flesh and the tools used in the “operation” were reburied in Erie.

2. Lt. Gen. Richard S. Ewell was buried 640 miles from his leg.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Photo: Wikipedia

A Confederate leader in the Civil War, Lt. Gen. Richard S. Ewell was seriously injured at the Second Battle of Manassas. His leg was amputated and buried in a local garden. Ewell returned to combat after a one-year convalescence and was taken prisoner near the end of the war.

He returned to private life before dying of pneumonia in 1872. He was buried in Nashville, Tennessee, 640 miles from his leg.

3. Maj. Gen. Daniel E. Sickles’ leg is in the Smithsonian.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Photos: Wikipedia and Wikipedia/Hlj

Maj. Gen. Daniel E. Sickles led his men to their doom at the Battle of Gettysburg when he ignored his orders and marched forward of his designated positions. Exposed, he and his men were brutally attacked and Sickles himself was wounded by a cannonball to the leg.

After his amputation, he decided against having his leg buried and instead sent it to the Army Medical Museum where Sickles visited it every year. It now resides at the Smithsonian Museum while Sickles rests in Arlington National Cemetery.

4. Lt. Gen. John Bell Hood’s leg was buried somewhere by an army private.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Photo: Wikimedia Commons

Lt. Gen. John Bell Hood lost his right leg after it was struck by a Minie ball during the Battle of Chickamagua in Georgia. His condition after the surgery was so bad that his physician, assuming he would die, ordered Pvt. Arthur H. Collier to take the leg to a nearby town where the general was being treated.

When Hood began to recover, Collier was ordered back to his unit and no one recorded what he did with the leg. Local folklore in Tunnel Hill, Georgia says the leg was buried there, near where Hood spent the first days of his recovery. The rest of Gen. Hood is buried in New Orleans, Louisiana.

5. Stonewall Jackson’s left arm has a famous grave.

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Photos: US Park Service and Wikimedia Commons

The grave of General Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson’s left arm is well known. Jackson was returning from a reconnaissance of Union positions in 1863 when his own soldiers mistook him for the enemy. Pickets fired on him and injured his left arm which was later amputated.

Stonewall’s chaplain buried the arm near Chancellorsville while Jackson was taken to Fairfield Plantation, Virginia. Jackson was expected to make a recovery, but he died of pneumonia eight days after his injury. He is buried in Lexington, Virginia, 44 miles from his arm.

NOW: 7 POWs who were total badasses after being taken captive

Lists

21 Pulitzer Prize-winning photos that capture the essence of war

These 21 images (shared with WATM courtesy of Lou Reda Productions) vividly capture the nature of war from a variety of angles. Each of them was awarded the Pulitzer prize for photography in the year indicated in the caption:


1944 – Aftermath of a flamethrower attack on Tarawa

 

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
(Photo: Frank Filan, Associated Press)

1944 – Lt. Col. Robert Moore, USA, returns to his family after fighting the Germans in North Africa

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
(Photo: Earle Bunker, The Omaha World-Herald)

1945 – The flag raising at Iwo Jima

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
(Photo: Joe Rosenthal, Associated Press)

1951 – Refugees fleeing across the Taedong River during the Chinese invasion of North Korea

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
(Photo: Max Desfor, Associated Press)

1965 – South Vietnamese casualties after a firefight with the Vietcong

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
(Photo: Horst Faas, Associated Press)

1966 – Vietnamese refugees fleeing an attack

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
(Photo: Kyoichi Sawada, United Press International)

1969 – Lt. Col. Nguyen Loan summarily executes a VC prisoner on the streets of Saigon

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
(Photo: Eddie Adams, Associated Press)

1972 – Marine on top of a war-torn hill after battle with NVA

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
(Photo: David Hume, United Press International)

1973 – Vietnamese children fleeing after napalm attack on Vietcong-held village

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
(Photo: Nick Ut, Associated Press)

1974 – Lt. Col Robert Stirm, USAF, returns to his family after 5 years as a POW in North Vietnam

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
(Photo: Sal Veder, Associated Press)

1977 – Vietnam veteran and wounded warrior Eddie Robinson at Chattanooga Veterans Day parade

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
(Photo: Robin Hood, The Chattanooga News Free Press)

1978 – American mercenary, member of “Grey’s Scouts,” holds gun to the head of a Rhodesian prisoner

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
(Photo: J. Ross Baughman, Associated Press)

1980 – Iranian Republican Guardsmen executing Kurdish rebels

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
(Photo, UPI)

1995 – American Marine trying to keep Haitian rioters at bay during unrest

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
(Photo: Carol Guzy, The Washington Post)

2002 – B-52 contrails during bombing mission over Afghanistan

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
(Photo: The New York Times)

2004 – Soldiers jumping into ditch in Iraq

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
(Photo – Cheryl Diaz Meyer and David Leeson, Dallas Morning News)

2004 – Soldiers taking Iraqi prisoner

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
(Photo: Cheryl Diaz Meyer and David Leeson, Dallas Morning News)

2004 – Iraqi schoolboy proclaims his freedom

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
(Photo: Cheryl Diaz Meyer and David Leeson, Dallas Morning News)

2005 – Marine taking an Iraqi insurgent prisoner in Fallujah

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
(Photo: Associated Press)

2005 – Marines huddle over wounded comrade during fighting in Anbar Province

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
(Photo: Associated Press)

2006 – Katherine Cathey spends the night next to the casket of her fallen husband, 2nd Lt. James Cathey, USMC

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
(Photo: Todd Heisler, Rocky Mountain News)

 

These images and many other iconic shots can be found in Moments, The Pulitzer Prize-Winning Photographs, A Visual Chronicle of Our Time (Hal Buell, Tess Press).

Lists

The best infantry weapons of World War II

World War II saw the introduction of a lot of great weapons and featured some awesome holdovers from World War I. Here are 32 of the best in a voteable list.


World War 2 Weapons 

More from Ranker:

This article originally appeared at Ranker. Copyright 2015. Like Ranker on Facebook.

Lists

The 25 most powerful militaries in the world 2018

President Donald Trump has emphasized military might during his first year in office, but the US is not the only country seeking to expand its battlefield capacities. Between 2012 and 2016, more weapons were delivered than during any five-year period since 1990.


Arms sales indicate who is beefing up their armed forces, but head-to-head military comparisons are harder to come by. Global Firepower’s 2017 Military Strength Ranking tries to fill that void by drawing on more than 50 factors to assign a Power Index score to 133 countries.

The ranking assesses the diversity of weapons held by each country and pays particular attention to the manpower available. The geography, logistical capacity, available natural resources, and the status of local industry are also taken into account.

Also read: Search militaries The top 10 militaries of the world in 2017

While recognized nuclear powers receive a bonus, the nuclear stockpiles are not factored into the score.

Moreover, countries that are landlocked are not docked points for lacking a navy, though they are penalized for not having a merchant marine force.

Countries with navies are penalized if there is a lack of diversity in their naval assets.

NATO countries get a slight bonus because the alliance would theoretically share resources, but in general, a country’s current political and military leadership was not considered.

“Balance is the key — a large, strong fighting force across land, sea and air backed by a resilient economy and defensible territory along with an efficient infrastructure — such qualities are those used to round out a particular nation’s total fighting strength on paper,” the ranking states.

Below, you can see the 25 most powerful militaries in the world:

25. Algeria

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Algerian Army. (Photo by Lamraoui.lamin)

Power Index rating: 0.4366

Total population: 40,263,711

Total military personnel: 792,350

Total aircraft strength: 502

Fighter aircraft: 89

Combat tanks: 2,405

Total naval assets: 85

Defense budget: $10.6 billion

24. Saudi Arabia

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Saudi Arabia – Saudi Arabian Naval Special Forces prepare for an assault during a subject matter expert exchange with Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force-Crisis Response-Central Command, in Saudi Arabia, May 15, 2017. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Kyle McNan)

Power Index rating: 0.4302

Total population: 28,160,273

Total military personnel: 256,000

Total aircraft strength: 790

Fighter aircraft: 177

Combat tanks: 1,142

Total naval assets: 55

Defense budget: $56.7 billion

23. North Korea

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
(KCNA)

Power Index rating: 0.4218

Total population: 25,115,311

Total military personnel: 6,445,000

Total aircraft strength: 944

Fighter aircraft: 458

Combat tanks: 5,025

Total naval assets: 967

Defense budget: $7.5 billion

22. Australia

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Australian army soldiers from the 2nd Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment. (USAF photo by Tech. Sgt. Jeremy Lock.)

Power Index rating: 0.4072

Total population: 22,992,654

Total military personnel: 81,000

Total aircraft strength: 465

Fighter aircraft: 78

Combat tanks: 59

Total naval assets: 47 (two aircraft carriers)

Defense budget: $24.1 billion

21. Iran

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Iranian soldiers.

Power Index rating: 0.3933

Total population: 82,801,633

Total military personnel: 934,000

Total aircraft strength: 477

Fighter aircraft: 137

Combat tanks: 1,616

Total naval assets: 398

Defense budget: $6.3 billion

20. Thailand

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Royal Thai Navy. (US Navy photo)

Power Index rating: 0.3892

Total population: 68,200,824

Total military personnel: 627,425

Total aircraft strength: 555

Fighter aircraft: 76

Combat tanks: 737

Total naval assets: 81 (one aircraft carrier)

Defense budget: $5.4 billion

Related: The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

19. Poland

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Polish soldiers pull security near a breach in the perimeter wall following a complex attack on Forward Operating Base Ghazni, Aug. 28, 2013. (Operational photo courtesy of Polish Land Forces)

Power Index rating: 0.3831

Total population: 38,523,261

Total military personnel: 184,650

Total aircraft strength: 465

Fighter aircraft: 99

Combat tanks: 1,065

Total naval assets: 83

Defense budget: $9.4 billion

18. Taiwan

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

Power Index rating: 0.3765

Total population: 23,464,787

Total military personnel: 1,932,500

Total aircraft strength: 850

Fighter aircraft: 286

Combat tanks: 2,005

Total naval assets: 87

Defense budget: $10.7 billion

17. Brazil

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
The Brazilian aircraft carrier NAe Sao Paolo.

Power Index rating: 0.3654

Total population: 205,823,665

Total military personnel: 1,987,000

Total aircraft strength: 697

Fighter aircraft: 43

Combat tanks: 469

Total naval assets: 110

Defense budget: $24.5 billion

16. Vietnam

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
(U.S. Army photo)

Power Index rating: 0.3587

Total population: 95,261,021

Total military personnel: 5,488,500

Total aircraft strength: 278

Fighter aircraft: 76

Combat 1,545

Total naval assets: 65

Defense budget: $3.4 billion

15. Israel

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
(Photo from Israeli Defense Forces Flickr)

Power Index rating: 0.3476

Total population: 8,174,527

Total military personnel: 718,250

Total aircraft strength: 652

Fighter aircraft: 243

Combat tanks: 2,620

Total naval assets: 65

Defense budget: $15.5 billion

14. Indonesia

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
(Photo by Spc. Elizabeth Cole, 9th Mission Support Command)

Power Index rating: 0.3347

Total population: 258,316,051

Total military personnel: 975,750

Total aircraft strength: 441

Fighter aircraft: 39

Combat tanks: 418

Total naval assets: 221

Defense budget: $6.9 billion

13. Pakistan

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

Power Index rating: 0.3287

Total population: 201,995,540

Total military personnel: 919,000

Total aircraft strength: 951

Fighter aircraft: 301

Combat tanks: 2,924

Total naval assets: 197

Defense budget: $7 billion

More: These countries still force people into their militaries

12. South Korea

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
South Korean Soldiers in the 631st Field Artillery Battalion, 26th Mechanized Infantry Division Artillery.  (U.S. Army photo by Pfc. Dasol Choi, 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs, 1st Cav. Div.)

Power Index rating: 0.2741

Total population: 50,924,172

Total military personnel: 5,829,750

Total aircraft strength: 1,477

Fighter aircraft: 406

Combat tanks: 2,654

Total naval assets: 166 (one aircraft carrier)

Defense budget: $43.8 billion

11. Italy

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Two troops ride on an A129 attack helicopter. (Photo by Aldo Bidini)

Power Index rating: 0.2694

Total population: 62,007,540

Total military personnel: 267,500

Total aircraft strength: 822

Fighter aircraft: 79

Combat tanks: 200

Total naval assets: 143 (two aircraft carriers)

Defense budget: $34 billion

10. Egypt

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Two Egyptian Mi-8 Hip helicopters. (US Air Force photo)

Power Index rating: 0.2676

Total population: 94,666,993

Total military personnel: 1,329,250

Total aircraft strength: 1,132

Fighter aircraft: 337

Combat tanks: 4,110

Total naval assets: 319 (two aircraft carriers)

Defense budget: $4.4 billion

9. Germany

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
A German soldier aims his gun during a Belgium and German military forces weapons qualification at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, April 29, 2009.

Power Index rating: 0.2609

Total population: 80,722,792

Total military personnel: 210,000

Total aircraft strength: 698

Fighter aircraft: 92

Combat tanks: 543

Total naval assets: 81

Defense budget: $39.2 billion

8. Turkey

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Turkish Armed Forces shells a group of YPG terrorists in the west of Jarablus. (Turkish military photo via Twitter)

Power Index rating: 0.2491

Total population: 80,274,604

Total military personnel: 743,415

Total aircraft strength: 1,018

Fighter aircraft: 207

Combat tanks: 2,445

Total naval assets: 194

Defense budget: $8.2 billion

7. Japan

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Soldiers from the Japanese 22nd Inf. Regt. prepare to attack Leschi Town, a MOUT site on Fort Lewis, during bilateral training with the U.S. 1-17 Inf. (Photo by Phil Sussman)

Power Index rating: 0.2137

Total population: 126,702,133

Total military personnel: 311,875

Total aircraft strength: 1,594

Fighter aircraft: 288

Combat tanks: 700

Total naval assets: 131 (four aircraft carriers)

Defense budget: $43.8 billion

6. United Kingdom

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
A British Parachute Regiment soldier prepares to load a helicopter during a simulated medical evacuation in an exercise at the Hohenfels Training Area, in Hohenfels, Germany, June 17, 2016. (Photo by Sgt. Seth Plagenza, US Army)

Power Index rating: 0.2131

Total population: 64,430,428

Total military personnel: 232,675

Total aircraft strength: 856

Fighter aircraft: 88

Combat tanks 249

Total naval assets: 76 (two aircraft carriers)

Defense budget: $45.7 billion

5. France

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
A French paratrooper aims his antitank weapon at an enemy. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Juan F. Jimenez)

Power Index rating: 0.1914

Total population: 66,836,154

Total military personnel: 387,635

Total aicraft strength: 1,305

Fighter aircraft 296

Combat tanks: 406

Total naval assets: 118 (four aircraft carriers)

Defense budget: $35 billion

4. India

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Soldiers of the Madras Regiment, Indian Army.

Power Index rating: 0.1593

Total population: 1,266,883,598

Total military personnel: 4,207,250

Total aircraft strength: 2,102

Fighter aircraft: 676

Combat tanks: 4,426

Total naval assets: 295 (three aircraft carriers)

Defense budget: $51 billion

3. China

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
The crew of a Chinese navy patrol plane. (Photo from People’s Liberation Army)

Power Index rating: 0.0945

Total population: 1,373,541,278

Total military personnel: 3,712,500

Total aircraft strength: 2,955

Fighter aircraft: 1,271

Combat tanks: 6,457

Total naval assets: 714 (one aircraft carrier)

Defense budget: $161.7 billion

2. Russia

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)
Russian Army Soldiers.

Power Index rating: 0.0929

Total population: 142,355,415

Total military personnel: 3,371,027

Total aircraft strength: 3,794

Fighter aircraft: 806

Combat tanks: 20,216

Total naval assets: 352 (one aircraft carrier)

Defense budget: $44.6 billion

1. United States

11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really meant)

Power Index rating: 0.0857

Total population: 323,995,528

Total military personnel: 2,363,675

Total aircraft: 13,762

Fighter aircraft: 2,296

Combat tanks: 5,884

Total naval assets: 415 (19 aircraft carriers)

Defense budget: $587.8 billion

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