7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real - We Are The Mighty
Military Life

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real

Peer pressure in the military has its fair share pros and cons. While some of our personalities allow us to coast through our professional careers, others have a harder time, lacking some essential social skills and confidence. Conforming to social standards and activities might help them fit in.


Then again, peer pressure probably accounts for the majority of hangovers among active duty service members and veterans.

Related: 33 images that perfectly portray your first 96-hour liberty

So check out our list of peer pressure examples that many of us have faced during our time in the military.

1. Drinking

Most service members drink like fishes right after they get off duty. If you’re under 21, it doesn’t matter. Alcohol will be pouring into cups or shot glasses throughout the barracks and base housing. There are, however, those select few who choose not to drink what ever reason.

That’s cool.

But continuously saying “no, thank you” to a delicious cold one could alienate you.

2. To be better than someone else

Competition is everywhere in the military — that’s the way it works. When promotion time comes around, you have look better than other troops to pick up the next rank. Those who already out rank you will urge you to do whatever it takes to be that guy or gal that moves on to the next pay grade.

It’s a positive form of peer pressure, but it’s there.

3. Looking good for the opposite sex

On active duty, we all wear the uniform. Once we’re off duty, we can wear our regular clothes. Some service members tend to dress better than others, which could earn them more attention from a hottie, leaving everyone else to their lonely selves.

We’re not suggesting you spend your next paycheck on a new wardrobe…but it couldn’t hurt.

4. Getting jacked

Depending on your duty stationed, being in top physical condition can earn you more respect. But if you’re sh*tty at your job and don’t have a brain between your ears, the respect level will lower quickly.

5. Buying something you don’t need

Peer pressure doesn’t just come from your fellow military brothers and sisters. Salesmen can pick you out of a crowd just by looking at your short haircut and that huge a** backpack you’re wearing. They will pitch you the idea that you desperately need whatever it is they’re selling.

Be careful of what you buy or what services you sign up to receive. Those sneaky bastards know you’re getting a guaranteed paycheck at least twice a month. You are gold to them.

Also Read: 7 hilarious Marine shenanigans the commandant wouldn’t like

6. “Let’s go out tonight”

If you’re an E-3 or below but you’ve got a car, you are basically a god to the other guys and gals. Your fellow barracks dwellers will say and do just about anything to hang out with someone who can drive them around.

They might not be your real friends, but let’s face it, you need all the friends you can get — especially if you’re staying in on a Friday night when you have a freaking car.

7. Re-enlisting

That pressure happens all the time when your service contract is nearing the end.

Can you think of any others?

Military Life

The 10 best things about being the daughter of a Marine

If you’re like me, your answer to the inevitable question, “So, where are you from?”  has to be answered in list form. Of course, the next question is always, “Oh, so you’re an Army brat?”


To which I answer, “Marine brat, actually.”

While this question used to fill me with dread, as I’ve gotten older I have come to embrace my time as a Marine brat. So, as a celebration of my childhood, I present to you the top 10 best things about being the daughter of a Marine.

1. Government officials are nicer to you

When I was in college, I went on a ski trip to Canada and forgot to bring my passport. When we tried to cross back into the U.S., the border agent gave me the side eye and started lecturing me about increased security.

Then we had this conversation:

Border Agent: Where were you born?

Me: Camp Pendleton, California.

Border Agent: (visibly becomes friendlier) Oh! Do you have a parent in the Marines?

Me: Yep! My dad’s a Marine.

Border Agent: Ah, that’s great. Well, just don’t forget your passport next time.

Boom. Thanks dad for keeping me from getting trapped in Canada forever.

2. You have a sword in your house

Sure lots of people have baseball bats or knives or guns in their houses, but not many have a sword. In high school, my dad’s dress blues sword hung on the wall in the den where it could strike fear into the hearts of boys while lending our house a sense of medieval charm.

3. Your dad scares your boyfriends

Which leads me to number 3. Now, I pride myself as being an independent, strong woman who doesn’t buy into that puritanical, patriarchal protection nonsense.

That being said, I can’t say it isn’t fun when my dad puts guys just the tiniest bit on edge. My high school boyfriend once told me that my dad was funny, friendly, and just a little bit terrifying. Heck, my best friend from college is still nervous around him.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
(Paramount Pictures)

4. You’ve seen “Full Metal Jacket” 627 times

Not the whole movie, just the first 20 minutes or so while your dad tells you about how realistic it is, how hard boot camp was, and how he broke his all of his leg bones during the first 5 minutes of boot camp but still made it to the end, damnit***

*I don’t know if this qualifies as a “best” thing or just “a” thing.

**He has clarified that he only had a stress fracture in his foot and it was the last week of boot camp. But still.

5. You are always on time

To be early is to be on time, to be on time is to be late, and to be late is out of the question.  

Military time isn’t just converting 1500 hours to 3:00 PM. It also means knowing you should really be there at 2:45.

6. You get really good at meeting people

Awkward small talk and continuously having the answer the same questions over and over again? Bring it on!

I’ve met at least 76 new people every year since I was born. Ok, I don’t actually have an exact figure, but from the time I was a wee one, I’ve been comfortable with being suddenly dropped into a completely unfamiliar group of people.  When my friends fretted about going away to a college where they wouldn’t know anyone, I was happily filling out applications for colleges all over the country.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
The Mast family celebrates retired Lt. Col. Jack H. Mast Jr.’s promotion to lieutenant colonel in 2006.

Moving has also made me great at 1) joining clubs 2) first dates 3) teaching college students.

7 . You don’t get overly attached to houses or places

In my family, we got into the habit of making “pros” lists when we moved somewhere new so we didn’t just focus on what we missed about the old place. This habit has forced me to look at the bright side of any location in which I find myself. I’m also great at packing and unpacking, and I won’t ever have to go through the existential crisis of my parents selling my childhood home, because I don’t have one!

The downside of not having a childhood home to return to is that I get overly attached to my stuff. “How can you expect me to throw away any of the birthday cards I’ve ever received. THIS IS ALL I HAVE”

8. But you get to live in awesome places

By the time I was 5, I’d already lived in Southern California, Japan, and Maryland.

Maybe you wouldn’t call Maryland awesome (but, crabcakes!), but every new place changes you for the better and becomes a part of you.

My family left Japan with a love of sushi, an amazing chopstick holder collection, and a life-long family friendship.  My parents kept in such good touch with a Japanese family we met while we lived overseas that their son came to live with us when he was in high school, and this summer my parents are going to his wedding in Turkey.

As an added bonus, you eventually know people in so many cities, that you can go on vacation virtually anywhere in the United States without having to pay for a hotel.

9. You become very close to your family

Throughout my life, I’ve had several friends refer to my family as “The Waltons.” When my mom was 25, she was living on a military base in Japan with a toddler, a baby, and a husband who was gone for months at a time. We quickly came to rely on each other for support and companionship.

daughter of a Marine

10. And even though you have to loan him to the Corps for long stretches of time, you know that your dad is, first and foremost, there for you

Semper Fidelis! 

Military Life

How to save when you’re living paycheck to paycheck

We all know we ought to save, but the idea of saving when we don’t feel like we have anything left in our bank account at the end of the month can seem overwhelming. Here are some tips to get your savings on track when you’re living paycheck to paycheck.  

Start with an emergency fund.  

Confused about where to start your savings journey? Sometimes it’s hard to know what to prioritize. What should we save for first – our retirement, our kids’ education or should we pay down debt? 

Why not start with an emergency fund? It can be a lifesaver – literally. A rainy-day fund can stand between you and financial ruin.  

An emergency fund should be at least $500-1,000 that is set aside in a separate savings account, one that you can access if necessary, but is not the same account you pay bills from. 

Save automatically each pay period. 

This is the quickest – and most painless – way to save. By setting aside an amount to be deducted from either your paycheck or transferred from your bank account each pay period, you can steadily build up your savings. You won’t miss it because you won’t ever “see” it or be able to spend it.  Even saving $20 each pay period will get you to a $500 emergency fund in less than a year. Once you’ve built up your emergency fund, move on to other goals and not worry about living paycheck to paycheck. 

Cut back whenever and wherever you caand REALLY transfer that money to your savings account. 

There are dozens of ways to cut back on your spending: you can start by ordering out less often and doing away with unnecessary subscription services and memberships. But the key is once you have reduced that expense, transfer those savings to your savings account. Otherwise, the extra money is way too tempting to spend!  

Don’t be afraid to ask for help. 

Finances are super personal, and for some reason are seen as a taboo subject. We have all struggled with saving, and we all need help sometimes. The good thing is that military families have lots of resources available to them. Every military installation has a financial counselor and there’s free, confidential financial counseling available through Military OneSource and when you take the Military Saves Pledge, the start of a simple savings plan.  

Each military relief society (AERCoast Guard Mutual AssistanceNavy–Marine Corps Relief Society, and Air Force Aid Society) has emergency grants or interest–free loans available, both way better options than turning to high interest credit cards or loans. 

Want more inspiration and information on growing your savings? Take the Military Saves Pledge and then visit www.militarysaves.org or follow us on social media. 

This article originally appeared on Military Families Magazine. Follow @MilFamiliesMag on Twitter.

Military Life

5 ways troops deal with their bug problems

Insects carry disease, infect food stores, and bring loads of other concerns with them. Keeping an area bug-free is a top priority for maintaining good health and hygiene.

The military has plenty of rules and regulations in place to help troops keep an area free of pests (which usually involves a lot of cleaning), but there are far more ingenious — and fun — ways to ward off these crawlers.


7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real

And yet so many people forget bug spray on their packing list…

(Photo by Spc. Matthew Drawdy)

Busting out a can of bug repellant

A regular can of bug repellent works wonders. Normally, you’d spray it on your skin to deter pests for a little while, but you can also use it to protect an entire area.

The more expedient way, however, is to just spray it everywhere. Or, for maximum recklessness, you could just take a knife to the can and let it explode everywhere. Just watch out for open flames, though, because aerosol bug-repellent is highly flammable.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real

Other branches have a version of this, but they actually respray their uniforms instead of just hoping it’s good enough.

(Photo by Cpl. Jonathan Sosner)

Insect-repelling uniforms

For the soldier with plenty of faith in the system, the U.S. Army fielded factory-tested, insect-repelling ACUs to soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan back in 2012. To their credit, the permethrin-treated clothing works kinda well at first.

Under factory conditions, the ACU-Ps were said to work for fifty washes. In the hands of soldiers, however, they last maybe three before the colors started to run.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real

It’s really a toss up. Most insects don’t really care, but you’re really just trading mosquitoes for wasps.

​(Courtesy Photo)

Smoking tobacco

Among the least-advised methods of repelling bugs (according to most medical officers, anyway) is to smoke nicotine, but many older vets swear by it — or it’s just a convenient excuse.

Let’s set the record straight on this with some university-backed studies and advice from subject matter experts: Yes, some insects, like flies and some mosquitoes, are deterred by tobacco smoke. However, most insects are actually drawn to heat and smoke because it feels like an ideal environment — burnt and damaged trees. Additionally, plenty of the more aggressive insects, like wasps, are actually drawn to the smell of nicotine and discarded cigarette butts.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real

Whatever works, am I right?

(Photo by Staff Sgt. James Selesnick)

Field-goal kicking camel spiders

Camel spiders are notorious. They’re extremely large spiders that will desperately cling to shade, even if that shade is cast by troops standing in the open desert. They’re not aggressive and non-venomous to anyone larger than a mouse, but no one wants to see a giant f*cking arachnid skitter up close in attempts to stay shaded.

Some troops will openly accept the punishments associated with negligent discharge if it means they can open fire on those suckers. Others opt for a more effective (and satisfying) method: punting ’em into a million pieces when they rush you.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real

Just remember, the see-through ones are the most dangerous ones. Have fun!

(Courtesy Photo)

Night-vision goggles to spot bugs

Scorpions give off trace amounts of ultra-violet bio-luminescence that can’t be seen by the naked eye. Coincidentally, most night-vision goggles pick up light from both ends of the electromagnetic spectrum. For better or worse, you can spot scorpions more clearly at night through a pair of NVGs.

Be warned. Sometimes, you’re better off not knowing how many scorpions are really hanging around your fighting position.

Articles

This Marine’s powerful music earned him an epic record deal

Keeping your head on a swivel, eyes always on alert, and being prepared for anything are just a few of ways Marines serving in the infantry stay vigilant while forward deployed.


With the constant threat of danger lurking around every corner, many veterans use music as a way to relax and recenter; some, like John Preston, take it one step further and use music to tell their stories and encourage others not to give up hope.

Related: This Marine rapper spits lyrics that veterans know all too well

During a tour in Iraq, Preston began his music career by writing the song “Good Good America,” which propelled John into the industry and landed him a record deal upon his return home.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
John takes a moment for a photo op while deployed. (Source: John Preston)

For the next few years, John slowly veered away from music and became a firefighter — but his passion for music didn’t die out.

Luckily, he managed to return to music signing with Pacific Records and quickly released his first single “This Is War” in the fall of 2014. The song became a national media topic after a Marine veteran made a call-to-action to veterans across the nation to make a stand against ISIS.

John’s musical momentum began taking shape once again as his record label released several of his songs in the following months.

Also Read: This incredible rap song perfectly captures life in Marine Corps infantry

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
Marine veteran and talent musician, John Preston. (Source: John Preston)

“We are taking our message to the public, and today we tell the mainstream that we are here and we are loud. The perception of the broken veteran is a myth that we refuse to buy into,” Preston tells WATM. “My music is about our lives and the real battles we have and continue to fight: on and off the battlefield. We are here to show our community and the general public our talent, work ethic, and our drive to push forward through all adversity.”

Sadly, in January of 2016, John’s brother ended his own life after a hard battle with post-traumatic stress. The action almost convinced Preston to end his music career once again but has instead fueled his passion and his new single “Superman Falls.”

Preston is an executive producer on the album, which climbed to #21 on the iTunes rock charts. The song continues to spread throughout the veteran community as well as the mainstream music scene. To check out the John Preston’s music on iTunes click here.

Currently signed with Concore Entertainment/Universal Music Group, his newest single “Before I am Gone” was released on September 5, 2017. To check out the John plans on donating 100 percent of his profits to Stop Soldier Suicide.

John plans on donating 100 percent of his profits to Stop Soldier Suicide.

Check out John Preston’s video below to watch his behind the scenes footage.

(Youtube, John Preston Music)
Military Life

Here are the best military photos for the week of December 23rd

The military has very talented photographers in the ranks, and they’re always capturing what life as a service member is like during training and at war. Here are the best military photos of the week:


Air Force:

U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Apphia Gomes, 336th Air Refueling Squadron, refuels a C-17 Globemaster III aboard a KC-135 Stratotanker near March Air Reserve Base, Dec. 18, 2017. The C-17 carried Elinor Otto, better known as Rosie the Riveter, on her first C-17 flight.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
(U.S. Air Force Photo by Master Sgt. Eric Harris / Released)

An Air Force medium sized robot approaches a simulated Improvised Explosive Device during a response training exercise, Dec. 21, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The EOD Airmen were evaluated on their ability to respond to a distress call, locate, identify and neutralize an improvised explosive device.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
(U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Eugene Oliver)

Army:

Command Sgt. Maj. Dana S. Mason, Jr. salutes the formation during the Military Surface Deployment and Distribution Command Change of Responsibility Ceremony.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
(U.S. Army courtesy photo)

Helicopters from the 1st Air Cavalry Brigade arrived to Chièvres Air Base, Belgium. The brigade, which is in the 1st Cavalry Division, stationed in Fort Hood, Texas, deployed with 89 helicopters, including Apaches, Chinooks and Black Hawks. The helicopters arrived by ship Oct. 19 at the port of Zeebrugge, Belgium, and were then staged at the base before they move forward to support missions in Europe.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
(U.S. Army photo by Jessica Ryan)

Navy:

The superstructure of the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) lights up during sunset in the Atlantic Ocean, Dec. 16, 2017. The George H.W. Bush was underway conducting routine training and qualifications.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Joe Boggio)

Lt. j.g. Cory R. Cameron recovers the “Oscar” dummy during a man-overboard drill aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Preble (DDG 88). Preble is deployed with the Theodore Roosevelt Carrier Strike Group to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations in support of maritime security operations to reassure allies and partners and preserve the freedom of navigation and the free flow of commerce in the region.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Morgan K. Nall)

Marine Corps:

U.S. Marine Capt. Timothy Denning, company commander of Alpha Company, 7th Engineer Support Battalion, 1st Marine Logistics Group, runs alongside his Marines during the 7th ESB Holiday Run at Camp Pendleton, Calif., Dec. 22, 2017. The Marines and Sailors of 7th ESB showed their holiday spirit by dressing up and singing holiday songs during the run.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Timothy Shoemaker)

Hawaii’s first three AH-1Z Vipers arrive aboard Marine Corps Air Station, Kaneohe Bay, Dec. 19, 2017. The arrival of the 4th generation attack helicopters enhances the capabilities and power projection of Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 367, Marine Aircraft Group 24, 1st Marine Aircraft Wing and MCBH.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
(U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Sgt. Alex Kouns)

Coast Guard:

Salvage crews working with the Hurricane Maria ESF-10 Puerto Rico response remove a wrecked vessel from Hurricane Maria in Sardinera, Puerto Rico, Dec. 21, 2017. The ESF-10 is offering no-cost options for removing vessels damaged by Hurricane Maria; affected boat owners are asked to call the Vessel Owner Outreach Hotline at (786) 521-3900.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
(U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Lisa Ferdinando)

Petty Officer 1st Class Jeffrey Crews, a marine science technician for Coast Guard Sector Anchorage, places a wreath for a fallen service member during the Wreaths Across America ceremony at the Fort Richardson National Cemetery on Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson in Anchorage, Alaska, Dec. 16, 2017.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
(U.S. Coast Guard photo by Lt. Jacob Gamble.)

Military Life

7 tips on how to get selected by MARSOC instructors

So, you want to be a United States Marine Corps Critical Skills Operator? Well, that’s really great to hear, but a word of warning to all you would-be Raiders out there: To start this journey, you must go through MARSOC Assessment and Selection.


MARSOC is one of our nation’s most elite fighting forces; its members are ready to respond to any crisis, anywhere.

These small but well-trained Marine units embrace the unknown and are prepared to face any challenge. To earn a position on a MARSOC team takes a superhuman effort and the willingness to go above and beyond.

On the long road between you and life as a Raider lies a 23-day training evaluation designed to test Marines’ mental and physical limits in order to reveal the true nature of a candidate’s character.

Related: 5 things infantrymen love about the woobie

Check out these seven tips on how to get selected by MARSOC instructors:

7. Be physically fit.

This tip is so obvious it almost goes without saying, but don’t be fooled by the 225 physical fitness test score required to qualify — this is very misleading. If you want to be competitive and have a real shot at being selected, a score of 285 or higher is recommended.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
Semper Fitness. (Image from USMC)

6. Semper Gumby — always be flexible.

Without getting into any specific details, selection creates a dynamic environment replicating austere scenarios that require ingenuity and out-of-the-box problem-solving skills. There is no manual for chaos and chaos is exactly what you will be expected to deal with if you become an operator.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
Drown proofed! (Image from USMC)

 

5. Know your knots.

Bowline, around the body bowline, double fisherman’s knot — believe it or not, knowing these knots is an invaluable skill. It’ll save you much pain and aggravation if you learn basic knots before selection. The granny knot is important, too, but you probably already know that one.

4. Be cool; it matters.

Selection is looking for the best, however, all the physical capabilities in the world amount to nothing if you can’t work as a team. Peer evaluation is a major part of selection. Whether you can get along with others has a substantial impact on reaching phase two.

3. Learn land navigation.

Learn how to read a map, orient yourself with a compass, shoot an azimuth, plot points, make intelligent route selections, and understand terrain association. Master these baiscs and always remember: get high, stay high. A straight line is not always the fastest route.

2. Take care of your feet.

You’ll be moving an impressive amount of gear and water across substantial distances for an unknown amount of time. This will take a toll on your feet. Your feet are your life in many situations, so take care of them accordingly. Seek out a doc and get up to speed on basic maintenance, put together a foot-care kit (gauze, bandages, moleskin, etc.), and use it.

Also Read: 5 ways Marines are like ancient Spartans

1. Never even think of quitting.

Quitting is the surefire way of never being anything you want to be or do anything you want to do. Quitting is a poison that infects all other aspects of your life. If you start quitting now, it can easily become a habit. It is the exact opposite of what MARSOC is looking for and there is no room for quitters on these teams.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
The badass MARSOC insignia pin. (Image from VanguardMil.com)

Military Life

Here are the best military photos for the week of January 20th

In the military, you never know what the week will bring. Thankfully, there are some very talented photographers in the ranks and they’re always capturing what life as a service member is like, both in training and at war. Here are the best military photos of the week:


Air Force:

Defense Secretary James N. Mattis speaks with Col. Joseph Kunkel, 366th Fighter Wing commander, after a town hall meeting at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Jan. 16, 2018. Mattis met with base leadership and fielded questions from Airmen during the town hall.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
(U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Malissa Armstrong)

A B-52 Stratofortress navigator, assigned to the 23rd Expeditionary Bomb Squadron, provides overview of different radars during a strategic bomber mission over Europe, on Jan. 16, 2018. The deployment of strategic bombers to RAF Fairford, England, helps exercise United States Air Forces in Europe’s forward operating location for bombers. Training with joint partners, allied nations and other U.S. Air Force units help the 5th Bomb Wing contribute to ready and postured forces.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
(U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Trevor T. McBride)

Army:

Cpl. Kevin Johnson (right), a Norfolk, Virginia native and a human resource specialist assigned to the Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, Fort Riley, Kansas, shows photos from his hometown to a group of students at an elementary school in Nowa Sol, Poland on Jan. 17, 2018. The purpose of the visit was to give the students the opportunity to learn more about the U.S. military and its involvement in Atlantic Resolve.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
(U.S. Army photo by Spc. Hubert D. Delany III / 22nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

U.S. Army Paratrooper assigned to the 1st Battalion, 503rd Infantry Regiment, 173rd Airborne Brigade engages a pop-up targets with M249 light machine gun during the marksmanship training at Cao Malnisio Range, Pordenone, Italy, Jan. 16, 2018. The 173rd Airborne Brigade is the U.S. Army Contingency Response Force in Europe, capable of projecting ready forces anywhere in the U.S. European, Africa, or Central Commands’ areas of responsibility.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
(U.S. Army Photos by Davide Dalla Massara)

Navy:

Belgian Commander Peter Ramboer (L), incoming Standing NATO Mine Countermeasures Group One (SNMCMG1) Commander, congratulates outgoing SNMCMG1 Commander Gvido Laudups as he receives the NATO Flag representing the conclusion of his command during the SNMCMG1 operational handover ceremony at Zeebrugges Marine Base, in Belgium.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
(Photo by FRAN CPO Christian Valverde/Released.)

Capt. Robert Jacoby, right, and Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Raymond Bedard, from Expeditionary Resuscitative Surgical System 19, prepare medical supplies aboard Royal Fleet Auxiliary ship Cardigan Bay during exercise Azraq Serpent 18. Azraq Serpent 18 is a bilateral exercise between the U.K. Royal Navy and the U.S. Navy dedicated to developing interoperability between partners across the medical domain in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kevin J. Steinberg/Released)

Marine Corps:

Hospital Corpsman Petty Officer 2nd Class Jonathan High, a Combat Skills Training instructor, teaches Soldiers with the Japan Ground Self Defense Force how to applying gauze to a simulated wound during Exercise Iron Fist, January 16, 2018. Exercise Iron Fist is an annual bilateral training exercise where U.S. and Japanese service members train together and share technique, tactics and procedures to improve their combined operational capabilities.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Robert Alejandre)

A Japan Ground Self Defense Force soldier leaves a pool during a Marine Corps intermediate swim qualification as part of exercise Iron Fist Jan. 16, 2018. Iron Fist brings together U.S. Marines from the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit and Soldiers from the Japan Ground Self Defense Force, Western Army Infantry Regiment, to improve bilateral planning, communicating, and conduct combined amphibious operations.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
(U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Cpl. Jacob A. Farbo)

Coast Guard:

A 45-foot Response Boat-Medium boat crew from Station Maui patrol off the coast during Operation Kohola Guardian, Jan. 16, 2018. Operation Kohola Guardian is a cooperative effort between state and federal agencies to reduce risk to mariners and whales in Hawaiian waters while supporting conservative efforts to ensure future generations have the opportunity to experience these animals in their natural habitat.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
(U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Amanda Levasseur/Released)

Members of the Hurricane Maria ESF-10 response work to dewater vessels impacted by the hurricane in Palmas del Mar, Puerto Rico, Jan. 16, 2018. The team was comprised of members of the Coast Guard and local salvage crews, working in the ESF-10 effort to remove the boats that were stranded in the hurricane. The ESF-10 is offering no-cost options for removing these vessels; affected boat owners are asked to call the Vessel Owner Outreach Hotline at (786) 521-3900

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
(U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Lara Davis)

Articles

Buzz kill: States might have legalized pot, but the feds still haven’t

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
Marijuana, along with nine other substances, is specifically prohibited under Article 112a of the Uniform Code of Military Justice and penalties for its use can range from a general discharge to dishonorable discharge (for positive results of a urinalysis) and even imprisonment for possession.


During election week, four states legalized medicinal marijuana use, joining a list of 40 states and the District of Columbia in saying “Mary Jane is a friend of mine — in some form or another.”

The federal government, however, is saying “not if you value your 2nd amendment rights.”

Currently, marijuana is legal for recreational use in Alaska, California, Colorado, Massachusetts, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, and Washington D.C.

Arkansas, Florida, Montana and North Dakota all voted last week to allow medical marijuana use, joining 17 other states who acknowledge the medicinal value of cannabis.

Outside of those 29 states, limited medical marijuana use (which generally refers to cannabis extracts) is legal in 15 other states.

The states that don’t allow any type of marijuana use are Idaho, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Indiana, and West Virginia.

While the Veterans Administration admits that it hasn’t conducted any studies to determine if medical marijuana can successfully treat PTSD, they do admit that there seems to be anecdotal evidence to support that claim.

Use of “oral CBD [cannabidiol] has been shown to decrease anxiety in those with and without clinical anxiety” the VA notes.

The VA goes on to explain that an ongoing trial of THC, one of the compounds in cannabis, shows the compound to be “safe and well tolerated” among participants with PTSD, and that it results in “decreased hyperarousal symptoms.”

According to an investigation by PBS’s “Frontline,” marijuana’s “danger” label came about predominantly as a result of a smear campaign against immigrants between 1900 and the 1930s.

The network acknowledges a report from the New York Academy of Medicine that states that, despite popular opinion, marijuana does not “induce violence, insanity or sex crimes, or lead to addiction or other drug use.” That report has not been refuted by scientific research to date.

In 1972, President Nixon ordered the Shafer Commission to look at decriminalizing marijuana use, and the commission determined that the personal use of it should, in fact be decriminalized.

President Nixon, according to PBS, rejected that recommendation.

To this day, marijuana use and possession is a federal crime, despite being overwhelmingly accepted by nearly all of the country in some form or another.

So why does this matter to the military and veteran community?

It all comes down to federal law. While a majority of the country recognizes the benefits and harmlessness of cannabis, the federal government does not.

In fact, the feds say marijuana users immediately forfeit their Second Amendment rights by consuming cannabis.

On September 7th the Washington Post reported that the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit ruled that federal law “prohibits gun purchases by an ‘unlawful user and/or addict of any controlled substance.’ ”

The court claims that marijuana users “experience altered or impaired mental states that affect their judgement” and that this impaired judgement leads to “irrational” behavior, despite the findings by both the New York Academy of Medicine and the Shafer Commission to the contrary.

Background checks for firearms purchases require buyers to acknowledge whether they are a “habitual user” of marijuana and other illegal drugs. If they truthfully answer “yes,” they are barred from buying a gun. That means gun buyers in states that legalized marijuana use had better not indulge in the new right.

Will this change any time soon?

To answer that question, one needs to look at how legalization has impacted the finances in the states that have made pot kosher. After-all, money makes the world go ’round.

According to CheatSheet, Oregon banked $3.5 million in its first month of recreational marijuana sales. Washington State hit the jackpot with $70 million its first year, and Colorado rolled a fat one with $135 million in 2015 alone.

That was enough for the U.S. Congress to pause and say “let’s think about this.” Currently sitting in the Senate right now is S.683 , or the Compassionate Access, Research Expansion, and Respect States Act (CARES).

Introduced by Democrat New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker in March 2015, the act moves to transfer marijuana from a schedule I to a schedule II drug, protect marijuana dispensaries from being penalized for selling marijuana, and directs the VA to authorize medical providers to “provide veterans with recommendations and opinions regarding participation in state marijuana programs”, among other things.

To give an idea of what a schedule II drug is, the U.S. Department of Justice lists ADHD medication as a schedule II drug.

So when will marijuana use be decriminalized on a federal level? It’s too soon to tell.

Until then, veterans will have to choose between our pot and our guns.

Articles

6 things to know about the VA home loan

The Veterans Affairs home loan can be incredibly confusing, and it’s easy to get overwhelmed with all of the information found on the VA website. So we have broken it down into six basic questions for you: who, what, when, where, why, and how?


*As always, when making decisions that impact your personal finances, make sure you’re sitting down with a financial advisor. Most banks have financial advisors on staff who are always willing to work with customers.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
Veterans Affairs employs assessors and appraisers to ensure that each home purchased by service members is priced correctly.(U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Eric Glassey, 4th Inf. Div. PAO)

1. Who:

Lendee eligibility is determined by service status:

Active duty personnel must have served a minimum of 90 continuous days to be eligible

Reserve or guard members must:

  • have six years of service in the selected reserve or National Guard, and
  • be discharged honorably, or
  • have been placed on the retired list, or
  • have been transferred to Standby Reserve or to an element of Ready Reserve (other than the Selected Reserve after service characterized as honorable), or
  • still be servicing in the Selected Reserve

Spouses can be eligible as well.

2. What:

The VA home loan program is a benefit for eligible service members and veterans to help them in the process of becoming homeowners by guaranteeing them the ability to acquire a loan through a private lender.

Utilizing the VA home loan, lendees do not make a down payment and are not required to pay monthly mortgage insurance, though they are required to pay a funding fee. This fee varies by lender, depends on the loan amount, and can change depending on the type of loan, your service situation, whether you are a first time or return lendee, and whether you opt to make a down payment.

The fee may be financed through the loan or paid for out of pocket, but must be paid by the close of the sale.

The fee for returning lendees and for National Guard and members of the reserve pay a slightly higher fee.

The fee may also be waived if you are:

  • a veteran receiving compensation for a service related disability, or
  • a veteran who would be eligible to receive compensation for a service related disability but does not because you are receiving retirement or active duty pay, or
  • are the surviving spouse of a veteran who died in service or from a service related disability.

3. When:

Lendees may utilize the loan program during or after honorable active duty service, or after six years of select reserve or National Guard service.

4. Where:

Eligible lendees may use the VA home loan in any of the 50 states or United States territories

5. Why:

Veterans Affairs helps service members, veterans and eligible surviving spouses to purchase a home. The VA home loan itself does not come from the VA, but rather through participating lenders, i.e. banks and mortgage companies. With VA guaranteeing the lendee a certain amount for the loan, lenders are able to provide more favorable terms.

6. How:

Eligible lendees should talk to their lending institution as each institution has its own requirements for how to acquire the loan.

Military Life

5 British army slang terms you need to know for your next joint mission

Although the United States and Britain have had their share of disputes early on in American history, today the two countries are the closest of friends.


In case you were living under a rock, British troops fought alongside US in the global war on terror. That means while our service members are overseas, there’s a solid chance they will encounter members of the British army on a joint mission.

That being said, the British have some popular slang terms that we Americans don’t use but probably should know.

Related: This British soldier may have spared Hitler’s life during WWI

So check out this list of slang terms you just might hear from your British counterparts on your next deployment.

1. “REMF”

This term stands for “rear echelon mother f*cker” which is directed to those service members who have cushy jobs (non-combat related) while stationed in the rear.

2. “Crow Bag”

Reportedly, this hilarious term stems from WWI and means “combat recruit of war.” The title is given to the newest of army newbies fresh out of boot camp.

3. “Lizard”

Meaning, an individual who screws up idiotically. That is all.

4. “Jack”

This term has several different meanings including selfish, lazy, and workshy (unwilling to work). Jack is the guy no one wants in their unit.

Also Read: This British sniper took out six insurgents by detonating a Taliban suicide vest

5. “Ally”

This is one of their more popular slang terms which means stylish, tough or hardworking. In comparison, our American troops wouldn’t use that word to describe a hardcore Marine — just saying.

Bonus: NATO

No, this one doesn’t stand for North Atlantic Treaty Organization like our minds default into thinking. It’s apparently a common phrase meaning a white tea with two sugars.

You can’t make this stuff up.

Check out Liam Brown‘s video below to hear these slang words perfectly pronounced and explained for yourself.

YouTube, LiamBrown

Military Life

5 places every boot needs to hit while at Camp Pendleton

Every week, new service members report for duty at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton located in Southern California. There, they’ll undergo some intense training — but they’ll also have some time off. So, the boots will often ask others what fun stuff is nearby.

You might get a few good suggestions but, for the most part, it’s tough for a newbie to travel around without spending a sh*t ton of cash. So, if you’re “ballin’ on a budget,” we’ve come up with a few places you can visit while on liberty that won’t bleed your wallet dry.


7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
The ferris wheel and ice rink located near the heart of Irvine Spectrum.

 

Irvine Spectrum

Located in Irvine, this outdoor mall contains of plenty of excellent restaurants, a state-of-the-art movie theater, and a Dave and Busters to help you hone your gaming skills. Just north of Camp Pendleton, the large shopping center has enough to keep you entertained for hours.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
Welcome to the laid-back OC Tavern

 

OC Tavern

Ready for some excellent fish tacos? Well, OC Tavern has great ones alongside a full bar to get you smashed — if you’re of age, of course. This place hosts concerts, has a cigar lounge, and is a great place to play billiards. Since it’s located just a few minutes north of Camp Pendleton, it’s an easy spot to reach on a Friday or Saturday night.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
The Kaleidoscope. They have girls at the gym!

 

The Kaleidoscope

Located in Mission Viejo, this shopping and entertainment area is close to Camp Pendleton and features a Buffalo Wild Wings, a solid movie solid theater, and a gym where real girls go — as opposed to the male-dominated Marine gyms.

Since it’s closer than Irvine Spectrum, the Uber ride will be cheap, which is perfect for junior enlisted who don’t make a lot of cash.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
Chill out and have a good time at Goody’s Tavern.

 

Goody’s Tavern

Located just north of Camp Pendleton, Goody’s Tavern is a chill place for great drinks and entertainment. You’ll run into tons of Marines here, so you know you’ll be in good company.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
Members of the Western Army Infantry Regiment, Japan Ground Self Defense Force, and Marines with the 13th Marine Expeditionary Unit play a game of football on the Del Mar Beach at the conclusion of Exercise Iron Fist.
(Photo by Sgt. Christopher O’Quin)

Del Mar Beach

Located near the main gate, the beach in Del Mar has everything you need to blow off steam. There, you can camp and rent small cottages for a few days at a time. These rental areas are so close to the shore that you’ll hear the waves lapping onto the sand as you sleep. There are also BBQ pits available, and you can sneak in a few games of football or volleyball before heading back to the office on Monday morning.

It’s perfect.

Military Life

Here are the best military photos for the week of November 11th

The military has very talented photographers in the ranks, and they’re always capturing what life as a service member is like during training and at war. Here are the best military photos of the week:


Air Force:

Firefighters from Moody Air Force Base, Ga. put out a blaze during nighttime live-fire training, Nov. 9, 2017, at Moody AFB, Ga. Moody and the Valdosta Fire Department joined forces to prepare for the possibility of nighttime aircraft fire operations.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Janiqua P. Robinson

An F-15E Strike Eagle from the 492nd Fighter Squadron, takes off from the flight line for a training sortie at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England, Nov. 6. The 492nd FS recently returned from a six-month deployment to an undisclosed location in Southwest Asia.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Emerson Nuñez

Army:

A Soldier from the 1-214th Aviation Regiment checks his aircraft during a simulated crash exercise Nov. 6 in the Wackernheim training area.

A UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter from 1-214th GSAB was used as a prop to add realism to the environment with around 70 personnel responding to the incident, including elements of the Mainz civilian fire and rescue services and Wiesbaden Army Airfield fire and rescue services.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
Photo by Paul Hughes

Spc. Matthew Williams, a cavalry scout assigned to 2nd Cavalry Regiment fires a Stinger missile using Man-Portable Air Defense Systems (MANPADs) during Artemis Strike, a live fire exercise at the NATO Missile Firing Installation (NAMFI) off the coast of Crete, Greece Nov. 6, 2017.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
(Photos by Sgt. 1st Class Jason Epperson, 10th AAMDC PAO)

Navy:

The guided-missile destroyer USS Oscar Austin (DDG 79) transits the Atlantic Ocean Nov. 7, 2017. The Oscar Austin is on a routine deployment supporting U.S. national security interests in Europe, and increasing theater security cooperation and forward naval presence in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of operations.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Ryan Utah Kledzik

Sailors attached to the U.S. 7th Fleet flagship USS Blue Ridge (LCC 19), participate in the Damage Control Olympics, a command training event promoting knowledge and safety. Blue Ridge is in an extensive maintenance period in order to modernize the ship to continue to serve as a robust communications platform in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Patrick Semales

Marine Corps:

Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. Robert B. Neller cuts a cake at a Marine Corps birthday ceremony at the Pentagon, Arlington, Va., Nov. 9, 2017. The ceremony was in honor of the Corps’ 242nd birthday.

Happy Birthday, Marines!

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Olivia G. Ortiz

U.S. Marines with Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, Marine Air-Ground Task Force-5 (MAGTF), integrated with 3rd Assault Amphibious Battalion, exit an amphibious assault vehicle while conducting their final exercise during Integrated Training Exercise 1-18 (ITX) on Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms, Calif., November 3, 2017. The purpose of ITX is to create a challenging, realistic training environment that produces combat-ready forces capable of operating as an integrated MAGTF.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Angel D. Travis

Coast Guard:

U.S. Coast Guard Chief Petty Officer Rich Bassin, a machinery technician on the National Strike Force’s Atlantic Strike Team, observes local Puerto Rican boat owners attempting to salvage a vessel in Fajardo, Puerto Rico, Nov. 6, 2013.

The Maria ESF-10 PR Unified Command, consisting of the Department of Natural and Environmental Resources, U.S. Coast Guard, in conjunction with the Puerto Rico Environmental Quality Control Board, Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. and Fish Wildlife Service, is responding to vessels found to be damaged, displaced, submerged or sunken.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Ali Flockerzi.

Coast Guard members from Station Venice, Louisiana, medevac a cruise ship crewmember who was experiencing appendicitis symptoms near Venice Nov. 6, 2017. The crewmember was taken to to emergency medical services at Station Venice in stable condition.

7 examples of peer pressure in the military that are all too real
Photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Travis Magee

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