5 reasons Pokemon’s Lt Surge was most likely a WWII veteran - We Are The Mighty
MIGHTY MOVIES

5 reasons Pokemon’s Lt Surge was most likely a WWII veteran

American bombs rain down on the Japanese soil of Iwo Jima. Lt. Surge, an American patriot, pilots his aircraft over the island of imperial injustice but suffers a catastrophic hit to the plane’s energy supply. He has no option but to adapt and overcome – ‘Go Raichu!’ The Pokemon can power the B-29 aircraft long enough for Lt. Surge to return to a friendly airfield. 

The alternate universe of Nintendo’s Pokemon adapted real world events into the game. This World War II veteran’s story is being gradually erased with each new generation of Pokemon games in the name of political correctness. This is a tribute to Lt. Surge before Japan removes him completely from the pages of the Pokedex.

  1. Lt. Surge was a pilot in the Army Air Corps

Like most combat veterans, Lt. Surge doesn’t talk about the war outright, we must piece together from different sources what happened.  

“I tell you, kid, electric Pokémon saved me during the war!” – Lt. Surge

The Army Air Corps was the predecessor to the Air Force and operated in the Central Pacific Area. In the Pokemon game’s Vermilion City there is a journal that states:

“Lt. Surge is rumored to have been a pilot while home in America. He used the electricity generated by Pokémon to power his plane.”

  1. Lt. Surge was a harsh but fair officer

The young officer booby trapped his entire gym with a double locking mechanism hidden in trash cans. I’ve never felt more personally attacked by a Nintendo game because at one time, I too, booby trapped my barracks room. Gentleman Tucker, a trainer at his gym said, ‘When I was in the Army, Lt. Surge was my strict CO. He was a hard taskmaster.’

  1. He probably fought in the Battle of London before deploying to the Pacific

In the games HeartGold and SoulSilver he can be found at the magnet train station in Saffron City after you get his pokegear number (a cell phone number) and you’ve spoken to him at the power plant. He will offer to trade his French Pikachu named Volty. In WWII during the Battle of London from 10 July – 31 October 1940, there were only eight Americans serving in that theater at the time. By the time the invasion of Japan on Iwo Jima from 19 February – 26 March 1945, he would have had more than enough time to fight on both sides of the world. How likely is that possible? It’s a video game and he has a French electric rat as a sidekick. So, I’m going to need you to get all the way off my back on this one.

  1. He was also a high-ranking officer of Team Rocket

In the manga, Lt. Surge is responsible for trainers losing their Pokemon on the famous cruise ship U.S.S. Anne. He is identified as a Team Rocket Executive, the main villains, and captures a trainer named Red. Red is tortured with electricity and thrown overboard. His plans to exploit Pokemon for his personal gain are foiled by a mysterious trainer named Yellow. Team Rocket had been using the U.S.S. Anne cruise ship as a means to transport stolen Pokemon from Vermillion City to Viridian City.

However, in the video games there is no mention of Lt. Surge as a member of Team Rocket. That may have been a marketing choice to remove the risk of offending an American audience by portraying a veteran as a bad guy. Later in the Gold and Silver series of the Manga he turns into a good guy and helps the main character on a quest.

  1. There is amazing fan art with pokemon being used in combat

The greatest thing about the Pokemon fanbase is that there are no limits to their imagination. When I was eight years old and played Pokemon Yellow on Christmas – it was the greatest day of my life. That impact was also shared by millions of other children across the world. We grew up and filled in the blanks. Here are some of the best artwork so far with pokemon fighting side by side in combat.

MIGHTY CULTURE

This journalist witnessed the rise of ISIS up close—and now he’s telling the story​

In 2007 I was a fresh-out-to-pasture journalist, trying not to lose my sanity as an Army wife and stay at home mom. I had worked most recently as a reporter for The Fayetteville Observer, but my husband, a Special Forces soldier, kept getting deployed. We couldn’t afford a nanny, and no daycare in town stayed open late enough to watch our son until I could get off work.


The Observer offered me an opportunity to write a blog and two weekly columns from home, and that’s how I came to meet Mike Giglio, a fresh-out-of-college writer for Charlotte Magazine, working on a story about military families at Ft. Bragg.

Giglio has written a book now, “Shatter the Nations: ISIS and the War for the Caliphate” – an open wound of a book, as raw and bleeding as the conflict itself.

But back in 2007, he came to my house, sat in my living room, made the requisite comments about the adorableness of my toddler, and interviewed me. He has since told me that I was the first person he had interviewed about war. He has interviewed many, many more people since. He wrote then:

Rebekah Sanderlin looks like an Army wife from a movie: the hero pulls out her picture in the opening scene, she has dark hair, engaging eyes, and a warm smile, she’s holding his kid, and you’re already hoping he makes it out of this thing alive.

12 years and as many deployments later, my husband and I are still married and, indeed, he appears to have made it out of this thing alive.

I followed Giglio’s career from a distance after that, watching as his byline hopped up to the big leagues and then across the ocean, first to London and then to Istanbul, and then right into the heart of war.

Now a journalist for The Atlantic, he spent four years living in Turkey and Syria, interviewing members of the Islamic State, their enablers, and legions of others who were pushing back against ISIS’ terror quest for power, embedding with U.S. military units as well as low-level groups of resistance fighters.
5 reasons Pokemon’s Lt Surge was most likely a WWII veteran

(The Atlantic)

His book is part memoir, part chronicle. We see the early movements of ISIS in the form of sources and scoops that grow into defeats and victories. He is unflinching in the descriptions but avoids the war-porn tendencies lesser writers find irresistible. There are no heroes and no villains, only humans showing up, day after day. Characters come and go, lost to war and the swirling chaos of life. There are no neat and tidy endings. This is news – news never ends.

His sparse, direct, writing style is appropriately like chewing on broken glass. A book about ISIS shouldn’t be overwrought. There’s too much gore, too much horror, too much human misery, for a writer in love with adjectives. No one needs those adjectives.

Of an Iraqi Special Forces soldier, he writes:

“So when militiamen kidnapped Ahmed from a checkpoint in Baghdad one day, they didn’t just torture him. They put a circular saw to his forehead and tried to peel off his face. Then they put a hood over his head, shot him five times, and tossed his body in a garbage dump, thinking he was dead. Ahmed survived, though, and was found by an elderly man, who carried him to a hospital. When he recovered, he had gained his nickname – The Bullet, for what couldn’t kill him – and he returned to his turret.

These are not pages to read before bed.

Giglio is captured and nearly executed, and he survives being hit by a suicide bomber. He sets these encounters on the table, like an indifferent dinner party host, as if to say, “Here it is. Make of it what you will.” And, of course, there is only one thing to make of it: ISIS is even worse than you thought.

I read Mike’s book during the vacant, pedestrian, moments of my mom-life. Sitting in my daughter’s gymnastics class, reading about the young Syrian mother who watched helplessly as a wall collapsed on all four of her children during a bombing. In the front seat of my minivan, parked at the high school, waiting for that once-toddler-now-teenager, reading about a man whose seven siblings were all killed by ISIS. Sitting in a doctor’s office waiting room while a friend’s wrist was being x-rayed, reading about ISIS fighters gathering body parts from numerous people into one duffel bag, only to leave the bag in the middle of a street.

I read about Mike, being zip-tied and beaten by a jeering mob in Egypt, before being thrown into a prison bus and carted to a sports arena, where sham trials and public executions were being held for political prisoners. And then the zip ties are cut from his wrists and he is inexplicably released. I think about the cub reporter I first met in my North Carolina living room, as eager for adventure as any young soldier.

5 reasons Pokemon’s Lt Surge was most likely a WWII veteran

He is in Iraq, embedded with a battalion from the Iraqi Counter Terrorism Force (ICTF) in Mosul when the results of the 2016 election are announced, and Americans of all political persuasions are melting down. He writes:

“I wondered if, when a country was at war for so long but only a select few ever waged it, the rest of society began to go a certain kind of crazy. Some played at civil war while others vowed to flee to Canada as political refugees, and too many Americans seemed to want to pull a bit of conflict into their lives just when so many people around the world were risking everything to escape from it.”

And then he finally escapes it himself, perhaps for good, writing this about then-new President Trump’s premature declaration of victory over ISIS: “As in the past, America was looking to move on from the region before the war was really over – leaving much of Iraq and Syria in ruins and ISIS still a threat. This was an impulse I embodied, too. As Colonel Arkan had once explained, the thing about going to war far from home is that you can always walk away from it.”

If you’re lucky, Mike. Only the lucky get to walk away.

MIGHTY MOVIES

History of Camp Pendleton in film and television

With its vast training areas and prime location along California’s shorelines, Camp Pendleton is well known for producing the finest fighting forces on the West Coast. What Camp Pendleton might be less known for, however, is that it has been a backdrop to some of America’s most famous films. Throughout Camp Pendleton’s history, multiple movie producers have utilized its training grounds over Hollywood sets to recreate authentic war scenes of our Country’s most famous battles.


“[Working with the entertainment industry] gives us an opportunity to showcase assets and capabilities that are available to production companies,” said U.S. Marine Corps Master Sgt. Katesha Washington, Entertainment Media Liaison Office (EMLO). “It allows us also to accomplish our mission of telling the story of Marines.”

Camp Pendleton has an ongoing story to tell that continues each day. Since the base opened, over 20 films have been produced including “Sands of Iwo Jima,” starring, John Wayne. During the filming which also cast 2,000 Marines, producers transformed the installation to resemble the Japanese island also using elements to resemble the volcanic ash from Mt. Suribachi. Additional familiar titles include TNT’s television series, “The Last Ship,” and Columbia Media Corporation’s, “Battle Los Angeles.”

5 reasons Pokemon’s Lt Surge was most likely a WWII veteran

(IMDb)

With access to starstruck active-duty Marines and their familiar training grounds, producers are able to create authentic scenes without a need to hire actors or build sets in some cases. But the Marine Corps does not merely reduce production costs without some benefit. In giving Marines opportunities to share the limelight with some of their favorite characters, the Marine Corps legacy is captured by telling its stories and reaching an audience, they might not typically reach.

For over a century, the Marine Corps has helped producers, writers and directors coordinate personnel, aircraft and equipment. “There are several steps leading up to filming a production,” said U.S. Marine Corps Maj. Matthew Hilton, also with the EMLO. “We figure out how and if we can or cannot support.”

5 reasons Pokemon’s Lt Surge was most likely a WWII veteran

(IMDb)

There have been countless stories told and countless stories yet to be told when it comes to Camp Pendleton’s rich history and tradition. Watching the actions of its Marines and sailors come to life on the big screen, both fictionally and non-fictionally only serves to preserve the Marine Corps heritage and real-life activities. And remember, the next time you watch your favorite action film, it just might have been filmed on the one and only Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton.

Articles

Keanu brings the pain in the newest trailer for ‘John Wick: Chapter 2’

Professional pain-factory John Wick (Keanu Reeves) is back for a sequel, and once again, there’s a whole cadre of well-dressed people who want him dead.


But if this trailer is any indication, they don’t stand a chance.

The star made waves online earlier this year when a video was released showing Reeves practicing his three-gun skills with tactical shooting master Taran Butler. The hard work appears to have paid off, as the trailer shows Wick aerating assailants in a variety of creative styles.

Reeves’ is joined by fellow Matrix star Laurence Fishburne, as well as Common, Bridget Moynahan, John Leguizamo, and Ian McShane.

‘John Wick: Chapter 2’ hits theaters everywhere on February 10th, 2017.

MIGHTY MOVIES

Darkstar: Is ‘Top Gun’s’ Maverick flying an SR-72?

Yesterday, we revealed that the new movie “Top Gun: Maverick” will feature what appears to be a Russian Su-57, but that’s not the only fictional-fighter shown in the movie’s trailers. Another scene seems to show Maverick flying a next-generation fighter dubbed “Darkstar,” according to the movie’s Matchbox toy line.

The Darkstar aircraft shown only briefly at the end of the movie’s trailer is very clearly not based on anything in operation today… but that doesn’t mean it’s without an analogous real-world platform. While we get a quick peek at the underbelly of the streamlined jet in the trailer, Matchbox’s toy line has actually offered us the best view of this aircraft to date.

5 reasons Pokemon’s Lt Surge was most likely a WWII veteran
The “Darkstar” Matchbox toy from the film “Top Gun: Maverick”

Based on the shockwave visible as the jet passes overhead in the trailer, it seems likely that this exotic-looking aircraft will introduce hypersonic platforms to the Top Gun universe. Supersonic aircraft (Top Gun’s F-14 Tomcat and F/A-18 Super Hornet) are capable of flying faster than the speed of sound (Mach 1). Hypersonic aircraft travel much faster — in excess of Mach 5, or around 3800 miles per hour.

Russia and China both claim to have hypersonic missiles in operation, with the United States lagging slightly behind. Thus far, no public aviation program has announced plans to build a hypersonic fighter plane, but there are programs already in motion that could certainly produce one.

The SR-72 in “Top Gun?”

5 reasons Pokemon’s Lt Surge was most likely a WWII veteran
Lockheed Martin

Lockheed Martin, for instance, has been working on developing a successor to the SR-71 Blackbird, the fastest military aircraft in history, that they claim will be able to fly at speeds even higher than Mach 6. Engine testing has already taken place, and it’s feasible that technology demonstrators for the aircraft may already exist. Interestingly enough… the Darkstar toy bears a striking resemblance to Lockheed’s own artist’s depictions of what the forthcoming SR-72 may look like.

5 reasons Pokemon’s Lt Surge was most likely a WWII veteran
Lockheed Martin artist’s rendering of the SR-72 (top) and “Top Gun: Maverick” Darkstar toy (bottom)

There are some differences between the two — most notably the use of two vertical stabilizer fins on the back of the “Darkstar,” with only one central stabilizer on the SR-72. However, because the Lockheed Martin image is nothing more than a conceptual drawing, the final platform (if it ever comes to fruition) could feasibly have either.

If the Darkstar is indeed a stand-in for the SR-72, it may not be intended as a fighter, but rather as a high speed, high altitude reconnaissance platform like its SR-71 predecessor. However, thanks to highly capable spy satellites, this semi-fictional aircraft may well be armed (in the movie, and in real life).

This article originally appeared on Sandboxx. Follow Sandboxx on Facebook.

MIGHTY MOVIES

Everything you need to know to start watching M*A*S*H

This article was sponsored by WGN America. Be sure to tune in to the All-Day All-Night M*A*S*H Marathon, Saturday, December 8th, starting at 9am/8am central.

The millennials out there know what I’m talking about. As kids, nothing made you keenly aware that your TV-watching session had run well past your bedtime quite like those distinctive opening chords and telltale yellow letters that meant a rerun of your parents’ favorite show was coming on.

But now that we’re all grown up and don’t need a constant stream of slapstick comedy, cutesy characters, and teenage drama to sustain our attention, it’s time to revisit and start binge watching one of the greatest television shows ever made — and I promise your dad didn’t tell me to write this.

Before you dive in (you’ll thank me later), here’s what you need to know to start watching M*A*S*H.


5 reasons Pokemon’s Lt Surge was most likely a WWII veteran

Inside a real MASH operating room during the Korean War, from a real-world Korean War doctor, Dr. Robert L. Emanuele of Chicago.

(Photo by Dr. Robert L. Emanuele)

A MASH was a real thing

In the Korean War, a MASH unit was a frontline medical unit, a Mobile Army Surgical Hospital. Wounded troops would be treated by a medic or corpsman, then taken to an aid station if necessary. Once there, if they needed more care, they would be evacuated, sometimes by the newly-developed helicopter, to a MASH for surgery. These units were as close as ten miles to the front.

What later became a movie and a legendary TV show, M*A*S*H got its start as a book, written by Richard Hornberger under the pen name Richard Hooker. Hornberger was a real-life surgeon in a MASH unit and the book documented a few things the author says were based on real events — though he never says which ones.

While the setting of the series is important, it’s all the characters that really drive the show. Here’s who you’ll meet:

Alan Alda as Hawkeye Pierce.

Capt. Benjamin Franklin “Hawkeye” Pierce

Hawkeye is a talented surgeon and pacifist from Maine who was drafted at the outset of the Korean War. He won’t use a weapon but he’ll let himself be sent to the front line if it means it’ll save a life. Like almost everyone in the 4077th, he enjoys a drink after work, even going as far as constructing a still in his tent, nicknamed “the Swamp.” His nickname comes from the book, The Last of the Mohicans.

Wayne Rogers plays Trapper John.

Capt. “Trapper” John McIntyre

Trapper is Hawkeye’s best friend on the camp for the first three seasons of the show (actor Wayne Rogers left the series after season three) before being replaced by Capt. BJ Hunnicutt. Trapper, a former football player at Dartmouth, was drafted from a hospital in Boston and was sent home from Korea before the end of the first year. He shares a tent with Hawkeye and Maj. Frank Burns, and spends his spare time drinking and chasing nurses.

Loretta Swit as Maj. Houlihan.

Maj. Margaret “Hot Lips” Houlihan

Major Houlihan is the chief nurse at the 4077th, a career member of the Army Nurse Corps, and a military brat – her father was an artillery officer. She’s a by-the-book kind of officer and the most capable nurse in the OR, but she’s carrying on an illegal relationship with Maj. Frank Burns.

With Frank, she is constantly battling the practical jokes from Hawkeye and Trapper and doesn’t respect the leadership style of the 4077th’s commander, Lt. Col. Henry Blake, who she is constantly trying to undermine.

Larry Linville as Major Burns.

Maj. Frank Burns

In the U.S., Frank Burns is an Army reservist with his own successful practice who married into a wealthy family in Indiana. In Korea, Major Burns is carrying on an illicit affair with Major Houlihan and, with her, trying to undermine the authority of Lt. Col. Blake. Despite his higher rank, Burns isn’t respected as a doctor, having flunked out of medical school twice. His actions in and out of the operating room reflect his ineptitude in medicine and in life.

McLean Stevenson as Lt. Col. Blake.

Lt. Col. Henry Blake

Henry Blake is an Army reservist and the commanding officer of the 4077th who was sent to Korea after asking a general if he took cream and sugar with a coffee enema. Blake is also a skilled surgeon but a chronic alcoholic. He’s a friend to Hawkeye and Trapper and puts medical needs ahead of Army formalities. He knows he’s not the best choice to be a commander of anything, but asserts his authority when needed.

Blake was sent home in the third season of the show and replaced by Col. Sherman Potter for the rest of the series. But the producers famously wrote a final scene into the third season finale that only Alan Alda knew about as they were filming the episode. It wasn’t until they finished shooting the regular script that the actors were told, and they filmed the final scene where Radar announces that Henry Blake’s plane was shot down over the Sea of Japan.

Cpl. Walter “Radar” O’Reilly 

Gary Burghoff was the only actor to play his character in both the 1970 M*A*S*H film and the CBS television show. He’s the company’s enlisted clerk, and one of the only two enlisted recurring characters, the other being Cpl. Max Klinger. His nickname comes from the fact that he acts on orders before they’re given and can predict things before they happen.

Cpl. Maxwell Klinger

Corporal Klinger was only supposed to be an extra in one episode, but viewers loved Jamie Farr’s character so much he was brought back in the regular cast for the rest of the show. Klinger was drafted from Toledo, Ohio, and is constantly looking for ways to get kicked out of the Army, most famously trying to be considered crazy and get a section eight discharge for wearing women’s clothes.

Capt. B.J. Hunnicutt 

Captain Hunnicutt was a young doctor fresh out of residency when he was drafted and replaced Trapper John at the beginning of the show’s fourth season. Where most of the other doctors are loose with their morals when it comes to women and war, Capt. Hunnicutt is true to his wife and the Hippocratic Oath.

He still enjoys having drinks with his colleagues, though.

Col. Sherman Potter

Colonel Sherman Potter is also a fourth season replacement, coming in for the dearly departed Lt. Col. Blake. Unlike Blake, Potter is a career U.S. Army surgeon who pays closer adherence to Army regulations – though hardly as strict as Maj. Houlihan and Maj. Burns would like. He fought in World War I as an enlisted cavalry troop at age 15 who was captured by the Germans. He later earned a commission after going to medical school in the years between World Wars. He was also in the Battle of the Bulge in World War II.

It’s not known how old Col. Potter is during the Korean War.

Maj. Charles Emerson Winchester III 

Major Winchester is a classically-trained physician and surgeon from an aristocratic family who isn’t accustomed to the “meatball surgery” performed at a MASH unit. He enters the show in season six as a replacement for Frank Burns who went crazy after Maj. Houlihan got married to someone else and was promoted out of the Korean War for it.

Winchester gets stuck at the 4077th after winning so much money betting against his commanding officer in Tokyo that his CO exiles him to the Korean War. He’s a much smarter, more conniving foil to Hawkeye and BJ’s antics.

Father Mulcahy 

Father Mulcahy is an Irish-Catholic chaplain at the 4077th and is surprisingly non-judgemental about the extramarital affairs of the unit’s doctors and nurses. Even though most of the staff is not religious (and Klinger is an avowed atheist), everyone treats the Chaplain with respect – even more because he tends to win all the base betting contests and poker games.

5 reasons Pokemon’s Lt Surge was most likely a WWII veteran

Things like not saluting superior officers.

So, how do Army officers get away with all this stuff?

As you can imagine, talented surgeons were hard to find in the Army. Of course some existed, but in a war like the Korean War, the numbers of military surgeons working on the front lines were augmented by conscription – in other words, they were drafted. The doctors of a MASH unit were doctors first, then Army officers if time allowed.

Writers, actors, and producers of the TV show M*A*S*H actually spoke with and interviewed many MASH doctors at length to get ideas for the show, so at least some of the antics you see on the show were grounded in reality. Again, they never specify which ones.

Now that you’ve read this primer, the only thing left to do is dive into the show and experience it for yourself. And believe me, there’s a reason why the show captured the attention of an entire generation of TV fans.

Be sure to tune in to the All-Day All-Night M*A*S*H Marathon, Saturday, December 8th, starting at 9am/8am central.

MIGHTY MOVIES

Marvel stars respond to Spider-Man leaving the MCU

Spider-Man has officially been booted out of the MCU, and the Marvel stars are just as upset as we are. Earlier this week, it was announced that Sony and Disney were unable to reach a new deal on the new films, so Tom Holland’s Spider-Man would no longer be a part of the Marvel Universe. Fans are heartbroken over the news, and it looks like MCU actors Jeremy Renner and Ryan Reynolds are equally torn up.

Jeremy Renner, who plays Hawkeye in the Avengers franchise, called Sony out in an Instagram post last night. “Hey @sonypictures we want Spider-Man back to @therealstanlee and @marvel please, thank you. #congrats #spidermanrocks#? #please,” the actor wrote alongside a photo of himself as Hawkeye.


Even if Disney is technically to blame for the decision (they wanted a 50/50 co-financing agreement), fans were quick to cheer Renner on. “YES!!! Thank you for speaking up Renner!! #savespidermanfromsony” one user commented.

Deadpool star Ryan Reynolds also chimed in to support Spidey after a fan tweeted at him and Tom Holland: “Can we get a Spiderman Deadpool movie now?” Reynolds responded: “You can. But you can only see it in my heart.”

This was clearly too soon for heartbroken fans, as the replies are full of crying gifs and teary emojis. Some fans are even begging Reynolds to somehow step in and reverse the decision. “RYAN U HAVE MORE POWER THAN ANY OF US PLEASE DO SOMETHING” one Twitter user replied.

It’s likely that even Reynolds’ clout won’t change Spidey’s fate at this point, but as Spider-Man taught us: with great power comes great responsibility.

This article originally appeared on Fatherly. Follow @FatherlyHQ on Twitter.

Articles

Here are the winners of the first annual Miami Vet Fest

The first annual Miami Vet Fest, a film festival created by Army veteran Bryan Thompson to showcase the work of veteran filmmakers, took place today. The event categories included feature films, short films, documentaries, web series, and commercials.


The following films were nominated for awards. (Winners in each category indicated in bold.)

Best of the Fest

Winner: “Birthday”

“Birthday” is a short film about a severely wounded Marine and his wife coming home for the first time following months of surgeries and rehabilitation. It is a powerful, realistic and dignified depiction of what it is like for our severely wounded soldiers and their spouses as they face enormously difficult times ahead. “Birthday” is not pro-war and it is not anti-war; it is simply a tale of one injured Marine’s circumstances based on the true stories of many of our wounded service members. While the film is an oftentimes heart-wrenching and difficult reality to watch, it is ultimately a celebration of marital solidarity and the human spirit.

Military Themed Scripted Short

Winner: “Day 39”

“Day 39” is the story of The Kid, a young American soldier on foot patrol in a remote region of Afghanistan.

When an Afghan grandmother, Zarmina, requests help from his platoon for a medical emergency, the Kid is sent into a dark mud hut to assist Doc, a seasoned medic, with a young pregnant woman who has gone into labor. The baby is breech and Doc and the Kid must take extreme measures to try and save the mother and child, despite cultural obstacles inside the hut, and unseen yet ever-present dangers outside.

https://player.vimeo.com/video/122587350
Also nominated in this category: “This is War,” “Ten Thousand Miles,” and “Absent without Love.”

Military Themed Web Series

Winner: “Black”

“Black” is a high-action web series crafted in the style of the feature film “Act of Valor,” the highly successful video game franchise “Call of Duty: Modern Warfare,” and the hit Fox Television series “24.” The first season was shot over 5 days in two states for only $10,000. The series was created by writer/director Frank T. Ziede and features real military vets.

Also nominated in this category: “Drunken Debrief”

Military Themed Unscripted

Winner: “Reinforcements”

Also nominated in this category:Letters: The Hero’s Journey,” “Steel Leaves,” “Valor: Jack Ensch,” “Valor: Ralph Rush,” “The Captain: A Bond of Brotherhood,” “We Answered the Call,” “Normandy: A World Apart,” “Return to Iwo Jima,” and “Three Miles From Safety.”

Veteran Created Production

Winner: “Please Hold”

“Please Hold” is a film about an Afghanistan and Iraq Combat Veteran named Jacob, who, while trying to pursue the next chapter in his life post-military service, is finding it incredibly difficult to get the help he needs in dealing with his Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. After serving four tours as a United States Marine in the Middle East; Jacob has come back home to find an apathetic society who seems almost oblivious to the true trials and tribulations that he and his fellow veterans experience in these seemingly never-ending wars. The film invites the audience on a journey that many veterans experience while interacting with different segments of our society as they try to reintegrate themselves back to a life they have long forgotten and depicts the hardships and frustrations that many veterans feel when they come back home.

Also nominated in this category: “To Those Who Serve,” “Brody.”

US Military Themed International

Winner: “Who’s Afraid of the Big Black Wolf?”

In 1944, somewhere in occupied Central Europe, Who’s Afraid of the Big Black Wolf tells the story of a multicultural triangle between a little shepherd and two officers from the opposite sides in a sensual and emotional Alpine story of two tunes and one whistle.

Military Themed Ad/PSA/Music Video

Winner: “Naptown Funk”

Also nominated in this category:Marine Corp Energy Ethos,” “Still Building a Legacy,” and “Stand.”

Miami Vet Fest was possible thanks to the support of the following sponsors:

We Are The Mighty is proud to be a part of the first annual Miami Vet Fest and to support veteran filmmakers.

For more information on the Miami Vet Fest, check out http://miamiwebfest.com/miami-vet-fest/.

MIGHTY MOVIES

The ‘Black Widow’ trailer came at us like a Russian spy in the night

The teaser trailer for Marvel Studios’ Black Widow is here and if you don’t have the soundtrack already pumping in your blood, then you need to re-watch with the sound on.

We’ve always thought of the MCU’s Natasha Romanov as a woman with no family and no past, just a bunch of red in her ledger, but this trailer hints at something more.


Taking place between Captain America: Civil War and Avengers: Infinity War, Scarlett Johansson’s standalone film is rumored to be the last for the original Avengers and the first for Phase Four. It doesn’t look like it will disappoint.

Take a look:


Marvel Studios’ Black Widow – Official Teaser Trailer

www.youtube.com

Watch the trailer:

In what appears to be a nice Russian-spy-family-reunion, Romanov is surprised by a guest who matches her fighting style move-for-move. Yelena Belova (played by Midsommar’s Florence Pugh, who is having a great year) is another alumna of the Red Room. Also to join in are David Harbour’s (Stranger Things) Red Guardian/Alexei Shostakov and Rachel Weisz’s (The Mummy) Iron Maiden/Melina Vostokoff.

There’s even a nice dinner scene with comedic relief and everything.

5 reasons Pokemon’s Lt Surge was most likely a WWII veteran

Romanov and her “sis” have unfinished business with their “family.”

Looks like the villain will be Taskmaster, who, in the comics, injected himself with SS-Hauptsturmführer Horst Gorscht’s primer, giving himself genius-level intellect and superhuman athleticism. He’s a master combatant, swordsman, marksman, and mimic.

5 reasons Pokemon’s Lt Surge was most likely a WWII veteran

Black Widow, Marvel Studios

At San Diego Comic-Con, a fight scene showed Taskmaster’s ability to mimic the movements of his adversary. Given that Romanov’s fighting technique was always so unique compared to the other Avengers, this should make for a visually exciting film. We can also hope for fun cameos (Robert Downey Jr. is already rumored to be one of them).

Directed by Cate Shortland (Lore), Marvel Studios’ Black Widow will open in theaters May 1, 2020.

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10 best opening sequences from the glory days of military TV shows

During the halcyon days of broadcast television – before streaming media and DVRs existed – there were a host of military-themed shows on the airwaves. As much as the quality of the episodes (in some cases even more so) these programs were known for their openings and the associated theme songs. Here are 10 of the most classic:


MCCALE’S NAVY (1962-1966)

Forget JFK’s story from his time in the Pacific. Everything America knew about the history of PT boats came from “McCale’s Navy.” The show also showed that skippers could be cool and that POWs should be treated well; in fact, the Japanese prisoner “Fuji” was one of the gang. They even trusted him enough to make him their cook.

COMBAT (1962-1967)

“Combat” lasted five seasons before American attitudes toward the purity of war were tainted by the realities of the Vietnam Conflict that came blasting into living rooms via the nightly news. “Combat” set a serious tone with this opening with epic orchestration and a narrator who’s basically screaming at the viewers.

GOMER PYLE, U.S.M.C. (1964-1969)

“Gomer Pyle U.S.M.C.” was actually a spin-off of “The Andy Griffith Show” and introduced the public to two concepts that remain true today: DIs are likeable guys underneath their gruff exteriors and (surprise!) the Marine Corps is populated by a goofball or two.

BRANDED (1965-1966)

The drama of the opening theme of “Branded” was by-far the best part of this show. Watching Chuck Connors weather the dishonor of having his rank ripped from his shoulders, his sword broken in two, and the front gate closed behind him after he was shoved through it was heavy stuff.

F TROOP (1965-1967)

Manifest Destiny made into a sitcom. “F Troop” was a comedic take on life in the U.S. Calvary across the western frontier where Indian arrows went through head gear and nothing else.

HOGAN’S HEROES (1965-1971)

Not unlike what “F Troop” did to the reputation of Native Americans, “Hogan’s Heroes” showed the country that the Nazis weren’t inhuman tyrants but rather lovable idiots or clueless buffoons.

THE RAT PATROL (1966-1968)

This opening segment was all about the visual of U.S. Army jeeps going airborne over sand dunes without the guys holding onto the .50 cals in the back flying out or breaking their backs. “The Rat Patrol” was the show that introduced the nation to special ops and the idea that two light vehicles could take on (if not defeat) a column of Panzers.

STAR TREK (1966-1969)

For all of its allegory and social commentary, at its heart “Star Trek” was a show about military life on deployment. The opening remains among TV’s best with Capt. Kirk’s monologue, the Enterprise fly-by, and the soaring (albeit wordless) vocals.

M.A.S.H. (1972-1983)

Set during the Korean War, “M*A*S*H” was derived from Robert Altman’s 1970 black comedy of the same name and the theme song was an instrumental version of “Suicide is Painless” from the movie. The show’s finale was the most watched broadcast of any show ever until Super Bowl XLIV.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wNblF1PkSwo

THE A TEAM (1983-1987)

“Punished for a crime they did not commit.” Oh, the injustice of it all. “The A Team” was known for gunfights, explosions, and car crashes that netted ZERO casualties. It’s also the show that made Mr. T into a household name.

MIGHTY MOVIES

This is what the Navy SEALs from ‘G.I. Jane’ are doing today

In 1997, director Ridley Scott decided to do something no other filmmaker has ever done — send a female into SEAL training and record it.


After a grueling training process, she and her class were diverted to support a satellite recovery mission. They got into a big firefight with the bad guys and she helped save the master chief who gave her shit for weeks.

The class graduated and moved on to become operational, but did you ever wonder what happened to them after that?

Well, we used our (fictional) WATM private investigators to look for the SEALs’ silver screen whereabouts, and here’s what they found.

Related: This is what happened to the soldiers from the ‘Hurt Locker’

FYI: Don’t take this literally.

Master Chief Urgayle

5 reasons Pokemon’s Lt Surge was most likely a WWII veteran
(Source: Buena Vista)

After he was wounded and saved by Lt. O’Neill in a cinematic finale, the master chief retired from the SEAL community and moved to a small town with his family — opening up a restaurant.

But his peaceful life didn’t last too long. He became a local hero when he f*cked up two mob guys who caused an excessive amount of commotion in his town.

5 reasons Pokemon’s Lt Surge was most likely a WWII veteran

After all the craziness ended, he got covered in tattoos, received a phone call from his Russian mob family and returned home to the motherland. He’s been there ever since.

5 reasons Pokemon’s Lt Surge was most likely a WWII veteran

Slovnik

5 reasons Pokemon’s Lt Surge was most likely a WWII veteran
(Source: Buena Vista)

Life after the SEAL teams got pretty complication for this sailor; he developed a split personality disorder but picked up a knack for carpentry.

5 reasons Pokemon’s Lt Surge was most likely a WWII veteran

Unfortunately, his wood-working career didn’t last very long after he got hated on by a bunch of non-believers.

He managed to rediscover himself and teamed up with a wealthy computer programmer saving lives through AI surveillance that identifies suffering civilians involved with impending crimes.

No one saw that career change coming.

5 reasons Pokemon’s Lt Surge was most likely a WWII veteran

McCool

5 reasons Pokemon’s Lt Surge was most likely a WWII veteran
(Source: Buena Vista)

This Navy SEAL did a few combat deployments but decided not to make it a career. He was recruited to play professional basketball for the Knights and ended up adopting one of his 14 -year-old orphan teammates who wore some raggedy-ass Michael Jordan shoes.

5 reasons Pokemon’s Lt Surge was most likely a WWII veteran

In the offseason, he plays wide-receiver for Boston Rebels football team and even won a Super Bowl. Good for him.

5 reasons Pokemon’s Lt Surge was most likely a WWII veteran
(Source: Screenshot from

Also Read: 7 ways to prove your spouse is a spy

Jordan O’Neill

5 reasons Pokemon’s Lt Surge was most likely a WWII veteran
(Source: Buena Vista)

After she helped defeat some Syrian bad guys and saved her master chief in battle, Jordan O’Neill eventually earned her SEAL trident — but never went operational.

The Navy found out she had a secret past that slipped through multiple security background checks. Before the Navy, Jordan O’Neill worked as a detective for a billionaire only known as “Charlie,” working as one of his angels. Frustrated, she departed the Navy and went rogue, working to take down the other angels she suspected of ruining her career.

5 reasons Pokemon’s Lt Surge was most likely a WWII veteran

After the angels thwarted her quest to bring them down, she changed her name to Kate Jones and used her brilliant manipulation tactics to sell high priced items in a suburban neighborhood — with her fake family.

5 reasons Pokemon’s Lt Surge was most likely a WWII veteran

MIGHTY MOVIES

Daniel Craig is driving this iconic car in next ‘James Bond’ film

Movies about sick cars doing impossible things was arguably perfected by the James Bond film franchise way before Paul Walker and Vin Diesel decided car chase movies were also about “family.” And the latest news from the set of the next 007 flick (and last Daniel Craig Bond) confirms a certain old-school iconic sports car is back. But, it’s not exactly the one you might guess.

On June 30, 2019, EON productions and the James Bond Twitter and YouTube pages released images and footage of Daniel Craig filming the as-yet-untitled “Bond 25” movie. And the car is driving is a throwback to 1987, specifically the movie The Living Daylights. (That’s the one where Bond dates a cello player and a-Ha does the theme song.)


The car is an ’87 V8 Aston Martin, which, in The Living Daylights sported lasers, a turbo-boost, and special retractable skis for, you know, snow driving. Though not as famous as Bond’s Aston Martin DB5 from the sixties movies like Goldfinger and Thunderball, the Aston Martin is, in some ways, probably closer to what a Bond car should be like in the cultural imagination; assuming, of course, the lasers and rocket-boost still comes standard on this particular car.

The Aston Martin V8 was driven by James Bond when Timothy Dalton played the role in his debut film. For Bond fans of a certain age, it’s very possible Timothy Dalton was the incumbent Bond when you were a little kid. (I know that was true for me!) Dalton only did two Bond movies; The Living Daylights and License To Kill, before a long Bond hiatus that resumed with Pierce Brosnan picking up the part in Goldeneye.

In Skyfall, Bond drives an Aston Martin DB5 that is exactly like the one Sean Connery drove in the sixties and jokes with M (Judi Dench) about an ejector’s seat. So, could the V8 Astin Martin Bond has in the new film also have all the old Timothy Dalton gadgets? Here’s hoping!

Bond 25 is out everywhere on April 8, 2020. Here’s everything we know.

This article originally appeared on Fatherly. Follow @FatherlyHQ on Twitter.

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6 newbie boots you wouldn’t want in your infantry squad

Hollywood war movies are usually comprised of strong and versatile trope elements like the wise seasoned soldier, the good decision makers, and the flawed protagonist who needs a solid character arch before the credits roll.


There’s also the cast of characters that are considered the weaker links, or they’re just so naïve audiences sigh with relief when they die off.

So here’s our list of newbie boots we wouldn’t want taking point on patrol with us.

1. Conrad Vig (“3 Kings”)

He’s the funny, goofy guy who also talks too much and no one takes him seriously until you get annoyed by his presence.

Great movie, but bad karate kick. (Image via Giphy)

2. Corporal Upham (“Saving Private Ryan”)

He stops himself from saving a fellow brother because his fear got the best of him, but to add insult to injury, he gave up an easy kill shot and let the German soldier off the hook. Unacceptable!

Unfreaking believable. You had him, Upham! (Image via Giphy)

3. Gardner (“Platoon”)

We knew this over-weight character was going to perish sooner rather than later — no way his stature meets physical regs. No squad wants the guy who can’t hold his own weight — literally — on their team.

He ain’t gonna make it! (Image via Giphy)

Related: The 6 best Hollywood sniper shots ever

4. Norman Ellison (“Fury”)

Although this character wasn’t meant to be a “tanker”, the situation called for it. There’s nothing worse for an infantry squad than the guy who refuses to do his job — killing the enemy.

Good for nothing. (Image via Giphy)

5. Fergus O’Donnell (“Jarhead”)

He’s the Blue Falcon that managed to burn down a weapons cache when all he had to do is sit and listen to Christmas music.

The ultimate Blue Falcon (Image via Giphy)

6. Gomer Pyle (“Full Metal Jacket”)

Also known as Leonard Lawrence in the film, Pyle was hated by his fellow recruits and they held an awesome blanket party in his honor.

This poor bastard. (Image via Giphy)Can you think of any others? Comment below.