There is no living astrophysicist to have a place in the hearts of as many space nerds as Neil deGrasse Tyson. Hell, he even holds the honor of being named People Magazine's sexiest astrophysicist in 2000, before making his mainstay in the public view with his works to promote scientific advancements and way before he helped declare Pluto the dwarf planet it actually is. ( It has an orbital pattern similar to a comet, it's beyond the gas giants and lies in the Keiper Belt, and has a surface area just slightly bigger than Russia. Fight me.)

But he has also been a vocal supporter of the Space Force. Once you tear away all the jokes, fantasies, and memes that the internet's generated the Space Force, you're left with a very serious take on how to to best look into the future. If or when the Space Force becomes a reality, there's no single human being better suited to become the first Secretary of the Space Force than Neil deGrasse Tyson himself.


Tyson is no stranger to serving with the United States Government on issues regarding space. In 2001, he served on a government commission to help determine the future of the U.S. aerospace industry. He again served on the President's Commission on Implementation of United States Space Exploration Policy, where he helped cement America's commitment to once again be the pioneers of the final frontier.

He's also no stranger to working with both the Air Force Space Command and NASA, the main two predecessors of the proposed Space Force. His work in the American Astronomical Society also places him as a top contender for the role.

Though he never served in the military and, obviously, not in the Space Force, but that's never been a disqualifying factor for many of the armed forces' secretaries.

(NASA photo by Bill Ingalls)

His appointment would also bring legitimacy to the often-joked-about branch. The true gravity of the Space Force's responsibility seems to be lost on much of the internet community. In response, Tyson has been making the rounds on the late-night circuit and internet talk shows to showcase the various, great benefits of maintaining a such a force.

As much as we all want to be the first space shuttle door gunner (and trust me, I'll be the first in line at the USSF recruiter's office if that job is announced within my lifetime), there are a million other things that the Space Force would realistically be doing.

Treaties bar any overt acts of war in space, but there's a clause in there about defensive measures. If anyone were to launch a missile at any of the countless military or civilian satellites in orbit (a capacity both China and Russia have both bragged about possessing), there needs to be a way to stop them. Some kind of defensive force.

The Space Force would also act in situations where astronauts become stranded in space, much in the same way the Coast Guard does on the water. This isn't a problem right now, seeing as there are only six people up there at this very moment, but when space travel becomes more of a reality for many people, it will become one.

It'll be perfect. Tyson could help prevent the film 'Gravity' from being a reality. Well, he's also got plenty of choice words about the film's scientific accuracy, but that's beside the point.

(Warner Bros. Pictures)

There are no officially released statements that outline the details of how the Space Force will be created other than the briefings that say it will happen. Tyson has also never officially shown any interest in heading the Space Force outside of giving it his approval, but when the eventual shortlist of candidates surfaces, we're hoping Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson tops it.