Military Life

7 tips on how to get selected by MARSOC instructors

So, you want to be a United States Marine Corps Critical Skills Operator? Well, that's really great to hear, but a word of warning to all you would-be Raiders out there: To start this journey, you must go through MARSOC Assessment and Selection.


MARSOC is one of our nation's most elite fighting forces; its members are ready to respond to any crisis, anywhere.

These small but well-trained Marine units embrace the unknown and are prepared to face any challenge. To earn a position on a MARSOC team takes a superhuman effort and the willingness to go above and beyond.

On the long road between you and life as a Raider lies a 23-day training evaluation designed to test Marines' mental and physical limits in order to reveal the true nature of a candidate's character.

Related: 5 things infantrymen love about the woobie

Check out these seven tips on how to get selected by MARSOC instructors:

7. Be physically fit.

This tip is so obvious it almost goes without saying, but don't be fooled by the 225 physical fitness test score required to qualify — this is very misleading. If you want to be competitive and have a real shot at being selected, a score of 285 or higher is recommended.

Semper Fitness. (Image from USMC)

6. Semper Gumby — always be flexible.

Without getting into any specific details, selection creates a dynamic environment replicating austere scenarios that require ingenuity and out-of-the-box problem-solving skills. There is no manual for chaos and chaos is exactly what you will be expected to deal with if you become an operator.

Drown proofed! (Image from USMC)

5. Know your knots.

Bowline, around the body bowline, double fisherman's knot — believe it or not, knowing these knots is an invaluable skill. It'll save you much pain and aggravation if you learn basic knots before selection. The granny knot is important, too, but you probably already know that one.

4. Be cool; it matters.

Selection is looking for the best, however, all the physical capabilities in the world amount to nothing if you can't work as a team. Peer evaluation is a major part of selection. Whether you can get along with others has a substantial impact on reaching phase two.

3. Learn land navigation.

Learn how to read a map, orient yourself with a compass, shoot an azimuth, plot points, make intelligent route selections, and understand terrain association. Master these baiscs and always remember: get high, stay high. A straight line is not always the fastest route.

Just keep those feet moving. (Image from USMC)

2. Take care of your feet.

You'll be moving an impressive amount of gear and water across substantial distances for an unknown amount of time. This will take a toll on your feet. Your feet are your life in many situations, so take care of them accordingly. Seek out a doc and get up to speed on basic maintenance, put together a foot-care kit (gauze, bandages, moleskin, etc.), and use it.

Also Read: 5 ways Marines are like ancient Spartans

1. Never even think of quitting.

Quitting is the surefire way of never being anything you want to be or do anything you want to do. Quitting is a poison that infects all other aspects of your life. If you start quitting now, it can easily become a habit. It is the exact opposite of what MARSOC is looking for and there is no room for quitters on these teams.

The badass MARSOC insignia pin. (Image from VanguardMil.com)

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