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MIGHTY TRENDING

North Korea is not happy about South Korean F-35s

If Kim Jong Un wanted to keep F-35s from being able to roam around his country with absolute freedom, he should have been investing in radar technology or fifth-generation fighters instead of nuclear weapons. Now, his erstwhile enemy to the South is getting some of the latest and greatest tech outside of the Marvel Cinematic Universe.


"We, on our part, have no other choice but to develop and test the special armaments to completely destroy the lethal weapons reinforced in South Korea, " said KCNA, North Korea's state media outlet.

KCNA says a lot of things, though. Very enthusiastically.

South Korea received its first two F-35 Joint Strike Fighters in March 2019 and will have another 38 delivered by 2021. North Korea's air force consists of very old Soviet-built MiGs and is largely unchanged from the air force his grandfather used. It's so bad even the North Koreans acknowledge their fleet leaves something to be desired. Now, with South Korea's acquisition of the world's most advanced fighter, the North may actually have to make some much-needed upgrades.

"There is no room for doubt that the delivery of 'F-35A', which is also called an 'invisible lethal weapon', is aimed at securing military supremacy over the neighboring countries in the region and especially opening a 'gate' to invading the North in time of emergency on the Korean peninsula," North Korea said in a statement via KCNA.

South Korean President Moon Jae-in shakes hands with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un during their summit at the truce village of Panmunjom.

While Kim and U.S. President Donald Trump are having a very public bromance, South Korea's President Moon Jae-in is largely left out of the media spotlight. When Trump arrived to meet with Kim at the Korean Demilitarized Zone, Moon was on the sidelines while Trump went for a walk in North Korea.

Rapprochement with the United States doesn't extend to the South in every instance, however. The delivery of the vaunted F-35 prompted the North to issue these stunning rebukes of South Korean defense policy, calling the South "impudent and pitiful."

"The South Korean authorities had better come to their senses before it is too late, shattering the preposterous illusions that an opportunity would come for improved inter-Korean relations if they follow in the footsteps of the United States," said North Korea in an official statement.