WWC Global is a leading women and military spouse owned small business that supports the management and operational needs of government agencies. WWC was also one of the first businesses to focus on military spouse employment, over a decade before it became a hot topic.

In 2004, Lauren Weiner found herself living in Italy and unemployable, despite an impressive resume. She left her position with the White House to follow her husband on his Department of Defense civilian assignment in Italy, when she quickly discovered spouses were not eligible for most government civilian positions. A few weeks after her arrival in Italy, she signed up for a bus tour to the Amalfi Coast. She had no clue that tour would change the trajectory of her entire life.


After overhearing Donna Huneycutt asking the tour guide if she could get coffee before the bus departed, she decided to follow her to get some too. "We started talking on the way over there and became fast friends within five minutes," Weiner shared. She quickly discovered that Huneycutt had left her job in corporate law to follow her husband to Italy, who was a Naval officer. She too was struggling with the lack of opportunities.

The pizza place in Italy where many meetings took place.

"We jokingly say that the company was started over coffee," Weiner shared with a laugh. Huneycutt echoed her sentiment and added that "we owe MWR for the founding of the company" since they provided the tour where the two met.

"The initial mission of the company was to provide employment for Lauren and enough employment for me so I could get some child care assistance. Shortly after that, the mission of the company was to find as many talented military spouses as possible and match them with the critical needs within the Department of Defense," said Huneycutt. "Then it evolved to finding qualified and outstanding people in different, under-tapped labor pools such as veterans, retirees and State Department spouses, aligning them with critical needs of the government. That mission still hasn't changed in the 15 years we've been doing this."

When Weiner was asked if they had ever anticipated their company growing as large as they have, she laughed and quickly said, "Definitely not!" Weiner explained that Huneycutt initially just planned to incorporate the company for her and then go on to write a novel, but they received their first contract and then another came along. They found themselves hiring their first military spouse, a Harvard trained lawyer, Jeanne McLaine. She was only being offered paralegal positions at the base, despite her background and extensive experience. McLaine still works for the company today.

"I was told I could be a secretary. There was actually a policy against anyone who was a dependent applying for a position above a GS-9 at the base at the time … I was told I could not have a GS-13 or GS-14 job because I was a trailing spouse," shared Weiner. "It was eye-opening and it was rough."

By the end of their first year in business, they had seven employees. Weiner shared that she actually never wanted to grow over 50 employees, thinking it could cause them to "lose who we are." But after a few years, they were well over that number. "The military spouse community is what built us in the first place and what supported us and sustained us," shared Weiner.

Currently, over 74% of their employees are military spouses and/or veterans.

With their continued success, they are often asked what their next big plan or idea is. "We never want to lose sight of the things that led to our success. Our commitment to honesty and credibility have continued to open doors for us. We measure our accomplishments by the success of our clients and our staff. We will continue to do this in the future," said Huneycutt.

Their firm is dedicated to leverage their expertise to serve their customers in various stages of policy design, exercise training, financial management, IT support and strategic management. Some of their clients include the Department of State, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy and the United States Agency for International Development.

"Our mission is and has always been to help make government more effective and efficient, because it impacts our own lives," explained Weiner.

Initially, the response to their firm successfully obtaining and running these large government contracts was one of disbelief. Disbelief in the fact that they were awarded the work and that they could do it. Weiner and Huneycutt were often asked if they were "doing this as a side business" until they became mothers to children. Or, it was assumed their husbands had established the company, although their husbands have absolutely no role in it. "We changed the dynamic and the conversation, very quickly," Weiner shared.

When Weiner was asked what advice she would give military spouses who want to start their own businesses, she offered, "Put your head down and do it. People are going to tell you that you shouldn't and give you every reason why it won't work. Do not believe them. It is really hard work and you have to work harder than anyone else, but you can do it," she said.

Their hard work has paid off. They now boast over 24 locations and their employees span four continents and 13 time zones. In the last two years alone, their operations have tripled. All of that growth led to their newly announced name change from WWC to WWC Global. They've also redesigned their logo to incorporate their history of its founding in Italy and their first client: the U.S. Navy.

"There have been many milestones that have made me pause and reflect. One of my favorites is the work we have done to provide meaningful employment to 170 military spouses," said Huneycutt.

"We were able to build this and we are going to continue to build it further," said Weiner. "Every once in a while, I stop and go… wow."

To learn more about WWC Global and what they do, click here.