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The Mighty 25: Veterans to watch in 2017

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After their service, many veterans find ways to continue to make great strides across the nation and the globe — from the arts to politics to non-profit organizations. One of the great privileges we enjoy here at We Are The Mighty is that we learn about and meet veterans who are doing really incredible, meaningful and sometimes truly badass things, every day.

Each year, we have the honor of choosing The Mighty 25 — a list of veterans whose amazing accomplishments suggest they are poised for major impact in the coming year.

It's always tough narrowing those who've really made an impression — veterans we want other veterans to know about — to a list of 25, because for every individual selected, there are several others who could easily take their place.

Certainly, there are veterans we'd be honored to highlight year after year. In order to keep things fresh, however, we try to cover a broad sweep of the veteran community and to highlight people we think our readers might like to track in the coming year. These are vets who make us proud, and we're excited to follow their work as the year progresses.

In alphabetical order, The Mighty 25 of 2017 are:

1. Daniel Alarik — CEO Grunt Style / Alpha Outpost

Daniel Alarik is an Army veteran and the founder, owner, and CEO of Grunt Style and Alpha Outpost.

Grunt Style sells unabashedly pro-military shirts and clothing to a veteran and civilian market proud to wear pride of service on their sleeve.

In 2016 Alarik started Alpha Outpost — a subscription box company for men with curated high-quality items focused on everything from cooking to survival.

Between these two companies, Alarik employs around 100 veterans, and his businesses are packed with patriotism and personality. But more than that, they're kicking ass — just what we like to see from veteran-run businesses. Here's to their bright and glorious future.

2. Lieutenant General (Ret.) David Barno — Distinguished Practitioner in Residence, School of International Service, at American University

Widely considered among the nation's leading defense intellectuals, David Barno is a retired U.S. Army lieutenant general who commanded coalition forces in Afghanistan from 2003 to 2005. He is currently a Distinguished Practitioner in Residence at the School of International Service at American University.

Barno recently co-authored a ground-breaking analysis of military leadership principles that challenged decades of Army policy, and his work for War on The Rocks remains highly influential as our country grapples with persistent global conflict and a changing political climate.

Barno's broad intellect, wide-ranging expertise, and undying commitment to a better Army inspire WATM to watch and learn from his continued impact.

3. Tim Bomke — Military Program Manager at Amazon

Tim Bomke is an Army veteran who was awarded a Bronze Star and Purple Heart and was medically retired in 2008 due to wounds sustained in combat in Iraq. After retiring, Tim went to work on the Department of Defense's Troops to Teachers program, as well as the Army Continuing Education System aboard Joint Base Lewis-McChord.

A passionate advocate for wounded veterans, Bomke was a founding member of Programs for Accelerated Veteran Employment and Microsoft Software and Systems Academy after noticing a gap between veterans seeking to break into the technology sector and programs to help them do that.

Bomke is now the Military Manager for Amazon helping to lead their veteran and military spouse hiring initiatives. His work this year will help employ a multitude of members our community.

4. Bonnie Carroll — President and Founder, TAPS

Bonnie Carroll is one of the 2015 recipients of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's  highest civilian honor presented to individuals who have made especially meritorious contributions. Ms. Carroll received the honor, and is admired throughout the entire U.S. military, for her selfless leadership at the forefront of the greatest battle our military families ever fight: that of the ultimate sacrifice.

A retired Air Force Major and the surviving spouse of Brigadier General Tom Carroll, Bonnie is the founder and president of the Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors, or "TAPS," which provides much needed compassionate care, casework assistance, and lifetime round-the-clock emotional support for those affected by the loss of a service member.

A staffer in both the Reagan and Bush White Houses, Bonnie Carroll was appointed as the White House Liaison for the Department of Veterans Affairs in Washington, DC. Before that, however, Ms. Carroll's own military career was one of distinction; Carroll retired as a Major in the Air Force Reserve following 30 years of service, including 16 years in the Air National Guard.

For her impactful, often life-saving work providing bereavement support for the families of our fallen, Bonnie Carroll has been recognized by the American Legion, the Department of Defense, and President Obama. We Are The Mighty salutes her, too.

5. Phillip Carter — Senior Fellow and Director of the Military, Veterans, and Society Program at the Center for a New American Security

Phillip Carter is a Senior Fellow and Director of the Military, Veterans, and Society Program at the Center for a New American Security. Carter's research focuses on issues facing veterans and military personnel, force structure and readiness, and the relationship between civilians and military.

Carter served in the Army for nine years, including an 11-month deployment to Iraq as an embedded advisor for the Iraqi police in Baquba. In 2008, Carter joined the Obama campaign as the National Veterans Director; he went on to serve as a Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense.

In addition to his military and government experience, Carter writes extensively on veterans and military issues for Foreign Policy, the Washington Post, and other publications, and serves on numerous boards and advisory councils in the veterans and military community.

Whether it's working with donors and grantmaking organizations to help them understand the needs of veterans, leading research that informs policy change, or convening leaders poised to make a difference in the lives of veterans, Phil Carter's influence is large and growing.

6. Mike Dowling — Producer, Author, Veteran Advocate

Mike Dowling, a U.S. Marine and Operation Iraqi Freedom veteran has dedicated his entire post-service life to his fellow veterans, servicemembers, and military families, and has become a much-admired leader of the greater Los Angeles veteran community.

Mike is a co-founder of the nonprofit Veterans in Film & Television which serves as both a networking organization and a way for the film and television industry to connect with the veteran community working in it.

He also founded the LA Veterans Orientation, which helps connect veterans newly transitioning from service in the L.A. area and helped develop and lead VA The Right Way, an initiative supported by veteran, nonprofit and governmental stakeholders alike that seeks to give veterans a greater voice in the redesign of the VA and to help build 1,200 permanent veterans housing units on the Los Angeles VA campus.

Dowling served as Director of Community Outreach here at We Are The Mighty, and in 2017 is leaving to be involved in the production for a major network based on military subject matter he is passionate about. We can't wait to see it.

7. Adam Driver — Actor, Arts in the Armed Forces Founder

Adam Driver is a Marine veteran who rose to fame on the hit HBO show "Girls," and who skyrocketed after starring as the villain Kylo Ren in "Star Wars: The Force Awakens", a role he'll reprise in Episode VIII later this year. Driver's impressive and growing film career has afforded him the opportunity to work with luminaries such as Steven Spielberg and Martin Scorsese.

In 2016, his performance in "Paterson" earned Driver critical acclaim and multiple awards. Coming soon, he will team up with Sylvester Stallone to star in the film "Tough As They Come,"  based on the bestselling book by former Army Staff Sgt. Travis Mills, a quadruple amputee who lost his limbs in a roadside bomb attack during his third tour to Afghanistan.

Driver founded the nonprofit organization Arts in the Armed Forces, which performs theater for all branches of the military at U.S. installations domestically and around the world. As Driver's star continues to brighten, so too does his commitment to helping veterans heal the scars of war and telling their inspiring stories.

8. Sen. Tammy Duckworth — U.S. Senator

Fresh off an upset victory over longtime Republican Sen. Mark Kirk, Army veteran Tammy Duckworth is on her way to the U.S. Senate with an eye toward giving former service members a greater voice at the national level.

Duckworth, a former Black Hawk helicopter pilot who lost her legs after a crash during combat in Iraq, previously served as a senior official at the Department of Veterans Affairs and as a U.S. congresswoman from Illinois' 8th District. The Asian-American lawmaker has consistently charted her own political course, but with a laser beam focus on supporting today's military and veteran community.

She's passed legislation aimed at helping veterans have more access to mental health care and made it easier for vets to get civilian certifications for skills they acquired in the military. We're looking forward to seeing what Senator Duckworth will do in Congress this year.

9. Ken Falke — Chairman and Founder, Boulder Crest Retreat; CEO, Shoulder 2 Shoulder

Ken Falke is a 21-year service-disabled combat veteran of the U.S. Navy and retired Master Chief Petty Officer. His first business, A-T Solutions, is internationally recognized for its expertise and consulting services in combating the war or terror. Ken is now the CEO of organizational improvement solutions company Shoulder 2 Shoulder, Inc.

Falke is also an innovator in the world of warrior care. In 2013 after Falke and his wife Julia witnessed first-hand the desolation and frustration the wounded experienced while spending time in military hospitals, they founded the exceptional Boulder Crest Retreat for Military and Veteran Wellness. Situated on a massive swath of pristine Blue Ridge Mountain land donated by the Falkes, Boulder Crest's mission is "To provide world class, short-duration, high-impact retreats for combat veterans and their families", in an environment "of healing that integrates evidence-based therapies, a safe, peaceful space and unparalleled customer service to improve physical, emotional, spiritual and economic well-being." The Retreat has hosted more than 1,000 veterans and their loved ones looking to reconnect and heal after service, with all services provided for free.

Ken is also the founder and Chairman of the EOD Warrior Foundation, which provides financial assistance and support to active-duty and veteran wounded, injured or ill warriors, families of the  wounded and fallen from the Explosive Ordnance Disposal community, and maintains the EOD Memorial.

Falke is passionate about educating our nation on issues regarding the long-term care of the returning military members and families who've borne the burden of our nation's longest wars. We Are The Mighty salutes this exceptional veteran, businessman and philanthropist for his thoughtful, generous, family-centered and solution-oriented approaches to the unique challenges facing post 9/11 veterans and their loved ones.

10. Matt Flavin — President, Concord Energy Holdings, LLC

Matt Flavin is a former Navy intelligence officer who deployed with SEAL teams and previously worked at the White House as its first director of the Office of Veterans and Wounded Warrior Policy under President Obama. After leaving the White House, Flavin went into the private sector as a senior executive with energy-related businesses. He is currently the CEO of Concord Energy Holdings.

At only 29 when he became director of the Office of Veteran and Wounded Warrior Policy in 2009, Flavin was one of the youngest vets to earn a senior White House position and marked a generational shift in veterans advocacy at the highest levels of government.

Now at the helm of one of the fastest growing energy companies in America, Flavin has demonstrated through his tireless advocacy at the White House and his innovation in business that this millennial generation of veterans is poised for greatness.

11. Brenda "Sue" Fulton — Board of Visitors at West Point, Advocate for LGBT Equality in the Military

Sue Fulton is a graduate of the U.S. Military Academy's first-ever co-ed class and is the first female and openly gay person to hold a position as a member of the West Point Board of Visitors.

Fulton has become a passionate advocate for the inclusion and rights of LGBT service members, and for women and people of color in the military. She is a founding board member of OutServe which provides legal assistance for openly gay service members and is a founder of Knights Out, an LGBT rights organization.

With her combination of fierce pride in her alma mater, the branch of service whose leaders it prepares and in the under-represented groups whose civil rights as soldiers concern her, Fulton strikes us as a military influencer to watch in 2017.

12. Dan Goldenberg — Executive Director, Call of Duty Endowment

Dan Goldenberg is a Naval Academy grad, Harvard Business School alum, and Air Command and Staff College graduate. He's also a Navy captain with over 24 years of active and reserve military experience and the executive director of Activision's Call of Duty Endowment.

Through the Call of Duty Endowment, Goldenberg's helping veterans find high-quality careers by supporting groups that prepare them for the job market and by raising awareness of the value that veterans bring to the workplace. So far his organization has helped place more than 25,000 post-9/11 vets in jobs that average a more than $50,000 salary.

The Call of Duty Endowment has set a goal to help 50,000 post-9/11 vets find jobs by 2019. Goldenberg and his team are poised for an aggressive push in 2017.

13. Matthew Griffin and Donald Lee — Co-founders, Combat Flip Flops

As former Army Rangers with several Afghanistan tours behind them, Matthew Griff and Donald Lee saw a country filled with hard-working, creative people who wanted jobs, not handouts. Terrorist organizations would target people who couldn't make ends meet, so Griffin and Lee created Combat Flip Flops as a way to help the people of Kabul, Afghanistan, create a sustainable economy.

Today, the company has expanded to Colombia, Laos, and Afghanistan, and they support charities like Aid Afghanistan for Education, which helps marginalized Afghans attend school. With the help of Combat Flip Flops, over 3,000 female students currently attend an AAE school. Additionally, some revenue from certain products is spent to clear 3-square meters of unexploded ordnance from a region rocked by long-term war.

We'll be continuing to watch how Combat Flip Flops uses its double bottom line to help make the world a better and safer place.

14. Florent Groberg — Director of Veteran Outreach at Boeing, MOH recipient

A French-born naturalIzed citizen who joined the US Army in 2008 and went on to receive numerous awards, decorations and the Medal of Honor for his heroic actions in Afghanistan, retired Capt. Florent Groberg is now the Director of Veterans Outreach at Boeing, where he's responsible for the company's support of military veterans and their families. He's a member of Keppler Speakers where he uses his experience to inspire audiences under the most adverse conditions.

He's also an advisor at Mission 6 Zero, a leadership development company created by for U.S. special operators.

For the past year, Groberg has been helping his peers prepare for life after the military through his partnership with LinkedIn's Veteran Program, in which the veteran community connects, networks, and grows professionally via the powerful LinkedIn platform. A passionate advocate for the veteran community, Groberg's every public appearance emphasizes education, transition planning and career development, all of which is inspired by the love and memory he has for those who gave their lives on the day for which his actions have been so prestigiously honored.

And for those so inspired, check out Capt. Groberg's moving interview with Stephen Colbert last year. Many of the female veterans we know are hoping to hear him speak a little more French in the coming year.

15. Dr. Anthony Hassan — CEO and President, Cohen Veteran Network

Dr. Anthony Hassan is a retired Air Force officer with over 30 years of leadership, mental health, and military social work experience. As the CEO and President of the Cohen Veterans Network, he's in charge of spearheading the organization's mission to improve the mental health of veterans across the nation.

Hassan lead one of the first-ever Air Force combat stress control and prevention teams embedded with Army units during Operation Iraqi Freedom in 2004. His groundbreaking work in military mental health and substance abuse treatment has paved the way for a variety of military medical innovations and programs.

With his work for the Cohen Veterans Network, Hassan is establishing 25 high-quality, free or low-cost outpatient mental health clinics in cities throughout the country. Additionally, Hassan continues to lead efforts to advance the mental health treatment profession through funded research initiatives and training programs to improve care within the network and beyond.

We're rooting for Hassan's success in 2017 as it lifts our community and improves the lives of veterans and their families.

16. Allison Jaslow — Chief of Staff, IAVA

Allison Jaslow is a former Army captain with two combat tours under her belt and serves as Chief of Staff for Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America.

Jaslow was previously Chief of Staff for Illinois Democrat Rep. Cheri Bustos and was the Press Secretary for Virginia Democrat and former Navy Secretary Sen. Jim Webb.

IAVA has quickly become one of the nation's top veterans advocacy organizations, and Jaslow's political experience on Capitol Hill and her recent military service will surely help continue her organization's fluency in the issues facing the post-9/11 veteran community.

Jaslow is an up-and-comer and is someone we'll definitely be watching as IAVA works to help recent vets navigate their post-service lives.

17. William McNulty — Co-Founder and CEO, Team Rubicon Global

Marine Corps veteran William McNulty is CEO of Team Rubicon Global, the disaster response organization he co-founded after the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, which offers veterans around the world opportunities to serve others in the wake of disasters. McNulty has worked in support of the Defense Intelligence Agency, the Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence, and the National Security Council's Iraq Threat Finance Cell. Among the vast community of veteran-serving nonprofits, McNulty is broadly admired for his success in scaling the Team Rubicon model internationally.

McNulty also serves on the Board of Directors of Airlink Flight, an international non-profit organization that connects commercial airlines with humanitarian initiatives, and on the Advisory Board of the Truman National Security Project, a policy advocacy organization that encourages the use of diplomacy, free trade, and democratic ideals to help resolve complex international challenges.

From Team Rubicon deployments with Prince Harry in Nepal to bringing veterans together with POS REP, 2016 was a busy year for McNulty, and we're excited to see what his veteran service organizations have in store for 2017.

18. Donny O'Malley — Founder and President, VET Tv

Danny Maher, a combat Marine veteran, goes by the stage name Donny O'Malley and is the founder of Irreverent Warriors (home of The Silkies Hike) and now VET Tv, the first video channel created by and for post 9/11 veterans. O'Malley's mission for VET Tv is to create high-quality, targeted entertainment for the veteran community that is therapeutic in order to promote camaraderie and prevent veteran suicide.

After a successful crowdfunding campaign, VET Tv is off and running, producing content "by bloodthirsty veterans and made for veterans with dark and twisted humor." Their programming plan is laid out on their website and quite frankly, we're subscribing to see what they come up.

19. Range15 Crew — Producers and Cast Members from the Feature Film

Range15 is a feature film presented by Ranger Up and Article 15 Clothing, two veteran-owned and operated military apparel companies.

Starring Mat Best, Jarred Taylor, Vincent Vargas, Jack Mandaville, Nick Palmisciano, and Evan Hafer, the movie has no shortage of up-and-coming veteran talent — but the guys took it one step further by getting names like William Shatner and Keith David on board. The film was a quick cult favorite and enjoyed a successful debut in theaters and on streaming platforms.

While some of these cast members (Mat Best, Nick Palmisciano, and Evan Hafer) have been highlighted in previous years for their successful veteran-owned and run companies, this band of brothers brought humor and in many ways a form of therapy to our community in a way that no other film has. Here's to hoping it's one of many to come.

20. Rob Riggle — Actor, Comedian

Rob Riggle is an actor, comedian, and Marine veteran. Riggle retired from the Marine Corps Reserves as a Lieutenant Colonel in 2013 after serving for 23 years, 9 of which he served on Active Duty and 14 more in the Reserves. Despite his growing career on screen, Riggle served as a pilot, Civil Affairs Officer and a Public Affairs Officer across numerous deployments to Liberia, Kosovo, Albania and Afghanistan.

Of his decision to finally retire, Riggle has said,  "I may have retired from the Marine Corps in 2013, but you never really stop being a Marine" — a statement borne out by his Iraq tour with the USO. In the years since, Riggle has done his part to advocate for and raise awareness of our veterans, attending numerous events that support our military family and most recently, co-hosting the first Rob Riggle InVETational Golf Classic with We Are The Mighty, to benefit the Semper Fi Fund.

Rob Riggle's star continues to rise. He's best known for his work as a correspondent on Comedy Central's "The Daily Show" from 2006 to 2008, and as a cast member on "Saturday Night Live" from 2004 to 2005, despite still being in the Reserves at the time! Riggle's also beloved for his comedic roles in numerous television shows and films. This year, we look forward to Rob debuting his own series on TBS.

21. Mark Rockefeller — CEO/Co-Founder of StreetShares

Mark Rockefeller is an Air Force veteran who later transitioned into a law career to help veterans secure financing for businesses and protect against predatory lending. Early in his post-Air Force career, Rockefeller worked on a pro bono micro-finance project in Africa which inspired him to help establish StreetShares, Inc.

StreetShares uses a combination of technology and social networking to obtain financial services for the military and veteran communities and to help veterans build businesses.

As the company puts it, "we've got red, white and blue running through our veins."

As more veterans leave the service and look for innovative ways to enter the workforce, groups like StreetShares are poised to make a major impact on helping veteran-owned businesses become a larger part of the American economy.

22. Vincent Viola — Secretary of the Army (Select)

Vincent Viola is the epitome of a self-made man. An Army veteran of the 101st, Viola has a Juris Doctorate from New York Law School but chose to focus on becoming a businessman rather than practice law.

In the course of his civilian career, Viola made his fortune by focusing his efforts on the oil industry. Viola has created a number of businesses in the tech, oil, and financial industries, among others. He currently owns the Florida Panthers.

After 9/11, Viola founded the Combating Terrorism Center, an academic institute that studies the terrorist threat and provides education towards mitigating it. He is President Trump's nomination as the Secretary of the Army.

With an increasingly tumultuous world and an Army poised for big changes, we'll be watching as Viola takes takes charge of America's largest service and shapes it for the future.

23. Kayla Williams — Director of VA's Center for Women Veterans

Kayla Williams is a former Army Arabic linguist who served with the 101st Airborne Division in 2003. She was recently appointed to be the Director at the Center for Women Veterans at the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Williams was previously a project associate for the RAND Corporation and is the author of "Love My Rifle More Than You: Young and Female in the U.S. Army," a memoir about her experiences negotiating the changing demands on today's military.

Kayla is a White House Women Veteran Champion of Change, a Truman National Security Project Fellow, and a former member of the VA Advisory Committee on Women Veterans.

As the principal advisor on female veterans issues to the Secretary of Veterans Affairs, Williams will play a big role in shaping the policies, programs, and legislation that affect an increasing population women veterans in the coming years.

24. Eli Williamson — Co-Founder and President, Leave No Veteran Behind; Director of the Veterans Program for the Robert R. McCormick Foundation

Eli Williamson is the Co-Founder and President of Leave No Veteran Behind, and was previously the Director of the Veterans Program for the Robert R. McCormick Foundation.

An Iraq and Afghanistan war veteran, Williamson was an Arab linguist and worked with Army Special Operations psychological operations teams.

After his time in the Army, Williamson created the non-profit Leave No Veteran Behind to invest in veterans and help build better communities through employment training, transitional jobs, and an educational debt relief scholarship. Williamson was also recently named as a  member of the new Obama Foundation's Inclusion Council.

With a strong influence in the minority community and a business outlook that believes "veterans are not a charity, but a strategic social investment," Williamson embodies the spirit of We Are The Mighty, and we look forward to many great things from him in the year ahead.

25. Brandon Young — Director of Development, Team RWB

Brandon Young is the Director of Development at Team Red, White, and Blue. An Army veteran, Young joined the military before 9/11 and served 11 years, mostly conducting Special Operations missions in support of the Global War on Terror.

Brandon is a speaker and contributor on podcasts and the Havok Journal where he shares his myriad experiences while in the service. His aim and sincere hope is to "give words to the voiceless who are struggling to find them; or the courage to say what's really on their hearts."

Young's primary focus with Team RWB is to develop and maintain strategic partnerships and identify growth opportunities that ensure the success of the nonprofit's programs. He recently handed over the Denver RWB Chapter where in the past two years he helped grow membership from 400 to 1,200.

We encourage you to look out for Brandon and Team RWB this year, and take part in their massive events including the Old Glory Relay, Eagle Charge (4th of July), WOD for Warriors (Veterans Day) and Run As One.

Military Life

Female veterans pose on same ship that carried WW2 troops

Award-winning nonprofit Pin-Ups for Vets is releasing its 13th annual fundraising calendar to raise money for VA hospitals; ill, injured, and homeless veterans; deployed troops; and military families. The 2019 calendar, photographed on the iconic Queen Mary in Long Beach, CA, features 19 female veterans decked out in World War II inspired fashion.

"Fans of Art Deco will appreciate the look of the upcoming calendar that reflects the vintage glamour of this 1936 cruise liner, now permanently docked in Long Beach, CA as a floating hotel," said Pin-Ups For Vets Founder, Gina Elise, who established Pin-Ups For Vets in 2006, as a way to honor the WWII service of her grandfather.

Gina Elise, Founder

Gina has devoted her life to giving back to the military community. To date, Pin-Ups For Vets has donated over $58,000 to help hospitals purchase new therapy equipment and to provide financial assistance for Veterans' healthcare program expansion across the United States.

The 2019 calendar is officially ready for pre-order at www.PinUpsForVets.com. All 2019 Pin-Ups for Vets calendar pictures were taken by Shane Karns Photography — and let me just tell you...he really nailed it.


Kirstie Ennis, U.S. Marine Corps veteran

From a linguist, to a Human Intelligence Collector, to a combat photographer, to a combat medic, to a motor transportation operator, to a heavy equipment transporter driver leading convoys in Iraq, to a helicopter door gunner in Afghanistan, these ladies also include an above-the-knee amputee veteran (Marine Corps veteran Kirstie Ennis — who, by the way, at the time of this publishing was climbing Mount Denali in support of Service to Summit to raise money for Building Homes for Heroes, a nonprofit organization that builds or modifies homes and gives them to veterans in need).

Julie Noyes, Army veteran

Army veteran Julie Noyes says, "It can be so difficult as a female service member to feel empowered in her beauty without feeling like she may betray the professionalism of her uniform when we only seek to be treated like our male counterparts. I feel that Pin-Ups for Vets does a superb job at raising money and awareness for our elderly, wounded vets and our currently deployed troops while also showcasing the class and beauty of female veterans without objectifying them. What Pin-Ups Vets Founder Gina Elise has done with this publication and non-profit is nothing short of empowering and inspiring."

Naumika Kumar, Navy Veteran

"I will always be thankful to the Navy. I met my husband in the Navy who is also a veteran now and I graduated from National University with Master's Degree in 2012 as well. I am happy to see there are organization such as Pin-Ups For Vets who are doing so much to support the military and Veterans. I am happy that I got an opportunity to be part of the organization."

Patti Gomez, Army veteran

Patti is a veteran of the United States Army, where she proudly served in the New York Army National Guard as a 35M (Human Intelligence Collector) of the 42nd Infantry Division, located in Glenville, New York. She volunteered to attend JRTC in Fort Polk, Louisiana, alongside the 27th Infantry Brigade Combat Team in July 2016. She also trained at Warfighter at Fort Indiantown Gap, Pennsylvania, with her unit in October 2017. Patti attended Basic Combat Training at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and attended Advanced Individual Training at the United States Army Intelligence Center of Excellence in Fort Huachuca, Arizona.

"Pin-Ups for Vets is an incredible organization with an important mission. Being a part of a nonprofit that helps veterans and empowers women at the same time is truly an honor and one that I couldn't pass up when I was asked to be a part of the 2019 calendar. As the reigning Mrs. New York America, my platform is veteran organizations — and Pin-Ups for Vets is truly among the best of them!"

Check out that cover image!

The 2019 calendar can be purchased at: www.PinUpsForVets.com or by check to: Pin-Ups For Vets, PO Box 33, Claremont, CA 91711.

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