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This fake stealth fighter helped secure the real one

As we all know by now, the F-117 Nighthawk was America's first combat-capable stealth aircraft. According to an Air Force fact sheet, it entered service in 1983, and was retired in 2008. It had a very effective career, serving in Operations Just Cause, Desert Storm, Allied Force, and Iraqi Freedom.


But one reason the F-117 was effective was because the Americans managed to keep it secret for the first five years it was in operation. As a result, many figured America's stealth fighter would be named the F-19 – and in two techno-thrillers, the F-19 had major roles.

Photo: Air Force Master Sgt. Edward Snyder

It was best-known as the F-19 Ghostrider in Tom Clancy's "Red Storm Rising." In that novel, the planes carry out a daring raid to destroy Soviet Il-76 "Mainstay" radar planes, enabling NATO to secure air superiority in the early stages of the war. One F-19 crew later takes out a Soviet theater commander.

Clancy's F-19 was very different from the F-117. It had a crew of two, and was capable of breaking Mach 1. It also carried weapons externally, including Sidewinder air-to-air missiles, and had a radar. While some sources, like Combat Aircraft Since 1945, credited the F-117 Nighthawk with the ability to carry the AIM-9 Sidewinder, most sources claim that the F-117 has no air-to-air capability.

A three-view graphic of what the F-19 was believed to look like. (Graphic from Wikimedia Commons)

The other appearance of the F-19 was in Dale Brown's "Silver Tower." This time, it had the right name, Nighthawk, but it also had a crew of two. Brown didn't go into the detail of his F-19 that Clancy did in Red Storm Rising. Brown's F-19s had one notable success, where they bluffed their way in to attack a Soviet base in Iran during Silver Tower. Both planes were shot down and their crews killed.

After the F-117's public reveal, the speculative F-19s were largely forgotten. But the "F-19" speculation helped keep the F-117 secret – and that secrecy was critical to the battlefield success of America's first stealth fighter.