8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army - We Are The Mighty
MIGHTY MOVIES

8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army

With three of the four largest names at Timely Comics (which would eventually become Marvel Comics) being U.S. Army veterans, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that many of the biggest names in their story lines center around U.S. Army veterans. Jack Kirby, Stan Lee, and Syd Shores all served in World War II. (The fourth? Joe Simon. And he was in the Coast Guard).


Related: These military veterans created you favorite comic books.

 

Whether they gained their powers through a Super Soldier project, magic, or even just skill — these Marvel super heroes proved to everyone the enduring strength of Army values.

Steve Rogers (Captain America) – World War II

 

8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army

In case you didn’t already know, the $12 billion film franchise and the most patriotic hero, Steve Rogers, was in the U.S. Army. Being a frail and weak soldier who still wanted to protect his people, he enrolls in the Super Soldier project. This grants him super strength, healing, and reflexes. He is also a master strategist and Earth’s greatest martial artist.

And if you’ve been reading the headlines and not the actual new comic storyline, no, the real Captain America is not Hydra, nor a Nazi.

Isaiah Bradley (Captain America) – World War II

8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army
(Panel via Truth: Red, White & Black #2)

Following the success of the first Captain America, Marvel tried to experiment again with another super soldier serum through an analogy of the real world Tuskegee experiment.

Isaiah Bradley was the only survivor. His powers mimic that of Steve Rogers, but his mind is constantly deteriorating and he became sterile (much like the effects of syphilis).

In the short lived but phenomenally written story “Truth: Red, White & Black” and then “The Crew” Bradley takes on the mantle of Captain America while Rogers was frozen in ice. Through it, the series ends with a man who saved countless lives, saved the world, and is now forgotten to history.

Josiah X “Bradley” (Justice) – Vietnam War

8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army
(Panel via The Crew #2)

The apple didn’t fall far from the tree with Isaiah Bradley’s son when the story of “The Crew” shifts. Josiah’s story takes place in the backdrop of the Vietnam War and then ’70s violence in Brooklyn. His powers are still the same of the other Captain Americas, and he’s armed with his father’s shield.

Writer’s Note: Seriously, I can’t recommend Christopher Priest’s work on this series enough. It’s one of the best damned comics I’ve ever read.

Bucky Barnes (Winter Soldier) – World War II

8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army
(Screen grab from Captain America: The First Avenger)

Thought killed in the same issue that Captain America joined the Avengers, James Buchanan Barnes was unveiled as the Winter Soldier. The once sidekick to Captain America became a coldblooded assassin and spy. He later regained his humanity and joined his old comrade and friend on the Avengers.

The name “Winter Soldier” is from Thomas Paine’s “The American Crisis” and an organization of Vietnam Veterans against the war. “The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country.”

Nick Fury (The Unseen) – World War II

8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army
(Panel via Wolverine: Origins)

From leading his Howling Commandos to become the Director of S.H.I.E.L.D., to transforming into the silent observer of Earth, Nick Fury has done it all without any actual abilities — and with only one eye. He has the Infinity Formula which kept him from aging, but it was with his mind and skill on the battlefield that allowed him to take down nearly every superhero in the Marvel universe.

Nick Fury — in both the main universe and “Ultimate Universe” (where he’s redesigned to look like Samuel L. Jackson) — many of his Howling Commandos, as well as his son Nick Fury Jr., all served in the U.S. Army.

Professor Charles Xavier (Professor X) and Cain Marko (Juggernaut) – Korean War

8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army
(Panels from Uncanny X-Men #12)

The story of both Professor X and Juggernaut’s time in the Korean War go hand in hand, with the stepbrothers both serving in the Army during the Korean war.

Charles had earned his Ph.D. in genetics before he was drafted and assigned to the same unit as his brother. When Cain deserted under fire, Charles went to retrieve him. He found himself in an ancient temple and gained magical powers of strength and immortality — making him an unstoppable force.

Charles, of course, has always had mutant powers.

Charles Xavier has been portrayed in the movies by Sir Patrick Stewart. The son of a regimental sergeant major in the British Army who’s unit was present in the Dunkirk evacuation, Stewart cites his father for inspiration for many of his roles on screen and stage.

Eugene ‘Flash’ Thompson (Agent Venom) – Iraq War

8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army
(Panel via Amazing Spider-Man #574)

The former bully turned friend of the high school student Peter Parker (Spider-Man) enlisted in the U.S. Army to fight in Iraq where he lost his legs on the battlefield saving his squadmate.

Dealing with depression, alcoholism, and post-traumatic stress, Flash became the new host of the alien Symbiote “Venom.” Mixing the military knowledge of Thompson with the alien abilities of Venom, Agent Venom became one of the newest heroes to Marvel’s line-up in 2008.

I couldn’t tell you what Marvel Studios and Sony Pictures have in mind for Agent Venom after Tom Hardy’s turn as Eddie Brock (Former host of Venom). But I can tell you that I would be 100 percent supportive of Tony Revolori’s depiction taking the oath of enlistment.

Related: 6 superheroes who were also Air Force officers

What other superheroes from the U.S. Army or military do you love? Let us know in the comment section.

*Bonus* Hal Jordan

8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army
(Panel via Sub-Mariner Comics #16)

He has no super powers, was only in one issue, and only helped Namor the Submariner fly a plane because he became a pilot for the Army Air Service. The only reason why this one-off character is even remembered is because his looks and military pilot background are the same as another character named Hal Jordan created 10 years later by DC.

MIGHTY MOVIES

‘The Mandalorian’ episode 6 recap: Mando makes bad choices

Is anyone else feeling some anxiety with regards to our Mandalorian’s decision-making? This week, he brings the Yoda Baby on a reckless adventure with very shady sidekicks. It’s just very irresponsible parenting, to be honest.

But hey, more fun guest stars.

Here’s your spoiler warning.


8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army

The Mandalorian, Disney+

Chapter six of The Mandalorian is called “The Prisoner” because Mando (I’m still struggling with this nickname…is every Mandalorian called “Mando”?) our Mandalorian accepts a job from Space Santa, officially known as Ranzar Malk (played by Patriot’s Mark Boone Junior), to release a prisoner from a New Republic prison ship.

We’re not really given a backstory into why he chose to go meet up with this dude from his past but it’s immediately clear that he walked into a hostile environment.

Usually in an ensemble heist situation, we’re introduced to a ragtag crew of lovable characters with specific skills, but here it’s just a list of annoying enemies.

There’s Mayfeld (played by Bill Burr), who will be running point on the operation because Space Santa is retired. Then there’s a Twi’lek named Xi’an (played by Game of Thrones’ Natalia Tena), who likes to do a full-body hiss and play with her knives, which I can appreciate. There’s the droid Zero (played by Apple Onion’s Richard Ayoade), who is a droid so our Mandalorian already dislikes him for reasons that haven’t been explained yet. And then there’s Burg (Clone Wars’ Clancy Brown), who Mayfeld immediately insults for his looks.

(Also, why do guys do this to their friends? I’m genuinely asking. Why do you guys insult each other all the time? I can’t imagine introducing my girlfriends and being like, “This is Sally, she’s our DD tonight, and that ugly slut is Jane, who has promised to buy the first round…”)

8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army

It’s like Guardians of the Galaxy meets Suicide Squad.

The Mandalorian, Disney+

So…when our Mandalorian accepted Space Santa’s job, he was under the impression that his Razor Crest wouldn’t be part of the deal. In other words, his plan was to — again — just leave the Yoda Baby alone on the ship and then fly off to some illegal and dangerous mission?

Instead, he’s surprised when all these greedy criminals, one of whom already bears a grudge (Xi’an, who also maybe used to have a sexual history) board his ship and fly it and the Yoda Baby into harm’s way.

And, like, literally the only thing keeping the baby hidden was a button? Which Burg immediately pushes during a skirmish where he tried to take off Mando’s helmet.

The only good thing about all this was Bill Burr’s reaction:

8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army

“What is that? Did you guys make that thing? Is it like a pet?”

The Mandalorian, Disney+

Just like in previous episodes, the Yoda Baby’s race is rare — none of these scoundrels recognize him or register his significance other than sensing he’s important to Mando. The Yoda Baby is then dropped again when the Razor Crest is yanked out of hyperspace and docked on the prison ship.

This kid is going to need a therapist, I swear.

8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army

The Mandalorian, Disney+

The distraction is enough to move the crew into the bulk of the episode. They board the prison ship, which is supposed to be manned by droids only. Our Mandalorian proves himself by taking out the first wave of them. Within the control room, however, they discover a young New Republic prison ward.

Unfortunately for this kid, he becomes collateral damage (RIP Matt Lanter), but not before activating a New Republic distress call. Now we’ve got a ticking clock, spurring the group into action.

They find their prisoner, another Twi’Lek named Qin (played by Berlin Station’s Ismael Cruz Cordova), who is Xi’an’s brother — stranded there by Mando. The crew rescue Qin and shove Mando into his cell, which actually made things interesting.

Would the crew take off with the Yoda Baby in the Razor Crest, leaving Mando locked in a New Republic prison? Potentially forcing him to team up with them as he builds toward the season finale?

Oh. No. He busts out in two seconds. He busts out so quickly that he’s able to also track down and imprison each of the other crew members before they were able to reach the ship?

8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army

Holy crap, he’s so cute.

The Mandalorian, Disney+

Speaking of which, back on the Razor Crest, Zero has learned that the Yoda Baby is an expensive asset and sets off to hunt him. Right before he’s able to shoot the child, the Yoda Baby readies his adorable little Force powers and BOOM the droid drops.

Cute moment when the Yoda Baby thinks he did it, only to reveal that Mando is standing behind the droid, having just shot him.

This leaves Qin, who tells Mando he’ll go clean and urges the bounty hunter to just do his job and deliver the bounty.

I was kind of hoping to see the Twi’Lek in carbonite but apparently it wasn’t necessary.

Mando delivers Qin to Space Santa, who abides by the “no questions asked” policy with regards to the missing crew, and takes off.

As he leaves, Space Santa orders an attack ship to kill him…

…but in a fun twist, Qin discovers the New Republic distress beacon on his person right before an echelon of X-Wings drop out of hyperspace and destroy the ship.

https://twitter.com/sithmando/statuses/1205413491269656576
baby yoda was shook #TheMandalorianpic.twitter.com/qZ0CWBXdYS

twitter.com

With two episodes left, I still have no idea where this show is going. It’s a fun ride but I’d love to see some more mystery and back story. What do you think?

Reminder, Chapter 7 will air on Wednesday, December 18, because Rise of Skywalker will open on December 19 and people will be busy all weekend watching that.

See you then.

#TheMandalorian Chapter 6 spoilers without context. #StarWarspic.twitter.com/rTti3gpvBe

twitter.com

MIGHTY MOVIES

10 awesome military movies on Netflix you might be blocked from viewing while deployed

Netflix subscribers on a trip outside the U.S. are sometimes surprised to find their accounts are blocked while overseas, primarily due to licensing issues. Some content is only licensed to the streaming service for viewers inside the United States (or is restricted in certain countries). And, by the way, Netflix is known to add users who circumvent the site’s security to blacklists.


In 2015, Netflix announced it would block Virtual Private Networks (VPN), which allow viewers from overseas to view the site and its contents as if they were in the United States. This week, the site announced it would start a heavy crackdown on those users.  Here are a few of the military/war movies those subscribers won’t be able to watch:

Restrepo

This is Sebastian Junger and Tim Hetherington’s war documentary masterpiece featuring the U.S. Army’s Second Platoon, B Company, 2nd Battalion, 503rd Infantry Regiment, 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team in the Korengal Valley of Afghanistan. The film (and the outpost defended in the film) is named after Pvt. 1st. Class Juan Sebastián Restrepo, a medic killed earlier in the deployment. Four years later, Junger would make another film, Korengal, which would pick up where Restrepo left off. Korengal is also on Netflix.

 

Top Gun

Here’s a military movie that requires no introduction and no explanation outside of a volleyball scene. This is a flick that probably guaranteed the Navy wouldn’t have to put any money into recruiting pilots for the rest of eternity. If the United States ever falls as a civilization, archeologists in future millennia are going to wonder where they can sign up.

The Civil War

The documentary series and style that allowed Ken Burns to turn a blowup and motion effect into a career is on Netflix in its’ entirety. Also on the streaming service is Burns’ epic-scaled but fairly “meh” World War II documentary in the same vein, called The War.

Comedy Warriors

Five wounded post-9/11 veterans have the opportunity to explore their experiences through humor. The film follows them and their work with professional comedians Zach Galifianakis, Lewis Black, Bob Saget, and B.J. Novak, who help them write and perform their own personal stand-up routines. One vet refers to the Iraq War as “a pretty aggressive study abroad program.”

Cartel Land

This is a film about vigilante groups fighting drug cartels in the Mexican Drug Wars. The most shocking part of Cartel Land is that its a documentary, and you can see the characters and events unfold as they did in the real world. It garnered a 94% audience rating on Rotten Tomatoes and is currently nominated for an Academy Award. It will also probably inspire Bundy clan copycats to take to the Arizona desert to “help” the U.S. Border Patrol keep ‘Murica free of invaders.

Forrest Gump

No one really needs an introduction to Forrest Gump. People still quote this movie to death in lame jokes and it’s now more than a decade old. It makes this list because of Gump’s Army service in Vietnam and Gary Sinise’s epic portrayal of Lieutenant Dan Taylor.

The Unknown Known

How do you feel about former Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld? Master documentarian Errol Morris’s 2014 film will either infuriate you or soften your feelings toward the lifelong government official with the most punchable face.

Beasts of No Nation

Netflix made a foray into conflict films this year with its critical hit Beasts of No Nation, starring Idris Elba as a warlord recruiting child soldiers to fight in a civil war in Liberia. The government of a West African country falls as the warlords forces attack a village under international protection. A young boy named Agu flees after his father is shot and is captured by the NDF rebel guerillas. Do not watch this film with kids, teenagers, anyone with emotions, or anyone who expects to not be traumatized.

Team America: World Police

Few movies are as epic as Trey Parker and Matt Stone’s Team America. If you’re a post-9/11 military veteran and haven’t seen this film, you must have been in such a secret squirrel MOS that the military kept you under a rock.

Ravenous

Less of a military movie and more of a horror movie in a military setting, Ravenous feature Guy Pearce visiting a remote U.S. Army outpost in post-Civil War California, a base full of the worst Blue Falcons of all time. Also featuring the worst trailer ever made for a decent film. Seriously, it looks like a fan trailer.

Bonus: TV Shows

Army Wives

Perfect viewing for anyone who ever wanted to pretend Catherine Bell was like the typical military spouse. I think the Army missed an opportunity here. There was never a better recruiting tool.

8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army

M*A*S*H

This is what we who grew up watching this show always hoped a real deployment would be like. If U.S. troops were allowed to build liquor distilleries in their barracks, we’d all become amateur engineers. Sadly, deployments are nothing like this

8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army

Archer

Five seasons of everyone who matters’ favorite secret agent for hire lives on Netflix, with the sixth season coming (phrasing!).

8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army

Related: 5 real-world covert operations in FX’s “Archer”

MIGHTY MOVIES

‘Falcon and Winter Soldier’ pilot sets up an emotional ride

Marvel has proved itself to be a master of balancing action and high stakes with compelling heroes navigating realistic emotional experiences. The pilot episode of The Falcon and the Winter Soldier could have been a basic buddy cop series, but instead the creators have set up a show that will explore trauma and PTSD and systemic racism while deconstructing modern America and its flaws. It hit its emotional beats succinctly and set up its two heroes — without even uniting them yet. 

Spoilers ahead.

The episode begins with a cool opening, showing off Anthony Mackie’s Sam Wilson AKA The Falcon and his wingéd suit. After thirteen years of action sequences, Marvel’s creative teams keep finding ways to get creative — in this case, Wilson teams up with U.S. military forces to recover a soldier kidnapped by wingsuit terrorists led by Georges Batroc, the acrobatic terrorist from Captain America: The Winter Soldier. 

Wilson is aided by a soon-to-be-fan-favorite Joaquin Torres, who gives intel support from the ground and, after their mission success, fanboys a bit over Wilson and asks him to confirm a conspiracy theory that Steve Rogers is operating on the moon. This slyly reminds us that the Avengers are famous, and while we know their stories, the people in their world don’t necessarily. 

In fact, most civilians in the Marvel Cinematic Universe are normal people living out their lives, watching aliens attack Manhattan, trying to cope as half of the population disintegrated into ash then reintegrated five years later. Those kinds of events have taken a toll — including radicalizing terrorist groups, whom we’ll see later in this episode, and impacting the economy, as we’ll also see. 

Wilson returns to D.C. to do “moon stuff,” where he offers the Captain America shield to the Smithsonian for Steve Rogers’ exhibit. Wilson still doesn’t feel worthy of the mantle of Captain America. His sister struggles to keep the family fishing business afloat — pun intended — and she doesn’t blink an eye when they are denied a loan from the bank, in spite of Wilson’s fame and status. He’s not the only person who had no source of income for the past five years (due to being snapped out of existence by Thanos) and now needs financial assistance. The undertones of the scene show that systemic racism is at hand as well.

Next we catch up with a haunted Bucky Barnes, who, despite his healing respite in Wakanda, suffers from symptoms of PTSD. He has nightmares and carries guilt from his 90 years of enslavement as a brainwashed assassin for HYDRA and the Soviet Union. He has a notebook filled with names of people he hopes to make amends to, including an older man grieving the mysterious death of his son — a man who was in the wrong place at the wrong time and was killed by the Winter Soldier. 

His therapist offers an insightful observation that should resonate with many veterans: “I was an excellent soldier, so I saw a lot of dead bodies and I know how that can shut you down. And if you are alone, that is the quietest, most personal hell. And James, it is very hard to escape.”

With both of their introductions, we can see that Sam is trying to figure out who he is. He’s comfortable being an airman — but he’s not ready to be Captain America and carry the weight of all Steve Rogers stood for. 

Bucky was a good man who spent almost a hundred years doing terrible things. He was basically still a kid when he enlisted and was taken captive by HYDRA. In one scene, he brings a date flowers and she calls him “adorably old-fashioned.” Sebastian Stan’s acting in that moment is very nuanced; he captures Bucky’s vulnerability beautifully. His family grew old and died while he was enslaved by HYDRA, his best friend returned home to the past without him, and now all he has for company is his guilt and trauma.

It’s clear the two will need each other, which sets up their future friendship for a satisfying connection. Meanwhile, young Torres has uncovered a terrorist cell aided by an operator with superhuman strength, which points the way this series will go. 

The most painful moment came at the end of the episode when the U.S. announced that there will be a new Captain America afterall — not Sam, the rightful shield-bearer, but some smarmy white chap. So that’s awkward.

MIGHTY MOVIES

9 ‘Game of Thrones’ weapons and their real-life analogs

When building a fantasy world, you draw inspiration from the real world for some of the practical details. In “Game of Thrones” (or “A Song of Ice and Fire” to my fellow book readers), almost every tool of death is based off of an actual weapon.


Excluding mythical things, like the Night King’s ice spear or Daenerys’ dragons (which are totally A-10s), you can usually point to a real weapon that bares a striking resemblance to the one in the series.

Jon Snow’s sword isn’t unique… at all.

 

8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army

Of course, Non-Valerian steel swords like Jon Snow’s exist, and having animal designs on the pommel are nothing new, but the devil is in the details of pinpointing specifically where they originate.

Everyone from the Vikings to Filipino warriors to the Romans made cool designs on the pommel. Those are cool and all, but do they open their eyes? Probably not. And neither did Jon’s.

The Mountain’s sword is an Irish Long Sword

8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army

 

The Mountain, being the strongest man in Westeros and the strongest man on Earth, would need an equally powerful weapon. What stands out about Gregor Clegane’s weapon is the pommel. It’s a symbol common among Irish long swords. It’s also featured prominently in the show as well in Sansa’s necklace as well as Cersei. Just throwing that out there…

Arya’s weapon is a French Rapier

 

8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army

Jon had a tiny sword made for Arya long before she turned into a faceless assassin who knew how to use it. Her blade doesn’t have an edge and is best “sticking them with the pointy end.”

It’s a lot like an actual rapier used as a Main-gauche, or parrying dagger used with the off hand.

Dothraki Arakh is the Egyptian Khopesh

8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army

The weapon of choice for the Dothraki and Daario come from the Egyptian sickle-sword. The advantage of using a khopesh is that it serves several purposes. It’s great as a sword, good as an ax, and excellent as a hook.

Wildfire is Greek Fire

8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army

The Wildfire used by the Lannisters is devastating. It won the Battle of Blackwater Bay and blew up the Septum. An extremely early version of a napalm thrower was used by the Byzantines for naval combat as early as 672.

Lannister’s Scorpion is the Roman Scorpion

8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army

 

Give it up for my boy Bronn. Sure, there may be heroic battles and perilous combat throughout the series. But to stare down a dragon with an untested weapon after it wrecked havoc on all of your fellow soldiers… Balls of Valerian f*cking Steel.

In real life, Greeks and eventually Romans used a smaller version that was perfect for long range combat.

Benjen Stark (Cold Hands)’s weapon is a burning version of a Japanese Chain Weapon

 

8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army

Most depictions of flails in popular culture are actually debatable for being historically accurate. If they had a chain, it was short for close combat. If it was longer, it’d be two handed and used on horseback (like Benjen).

The closest to reality that Benjen uses is perhaps a variation of the kusarigama, a weapon synonymous with another historically debatable group: ninjas.

Tormund’s Ax is a Mesoamerican Macuahuitl

8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army

This one blows my mind for not just its similarly primitive design, but also how it was made. It’s never outright stated in the show, but it looks as if his ax is made of Dragonglass — something we know can kill White Walkers and Wights. Dragonglass is also known as obsidian in the show and lore.

In early Mesoamerica, warriors would use chipped obsidian on sticks to create a devastating sword/ax that could cut through their foes.

Beric’s flaming sword is a circus performer’s sword… and, uh, this guy’s sword

8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army

Beric has these guys beat by using magic to light their swords on fire, but it’s been a common tactic used in lighting arrows on fire. A burning sword is cool, but impractical for actual fighting because it would need a constant supply of fuel.

This is why it’s just used by circus performers.

But then again. A fan recreated the Shishkebab from Fallout 4, giving it a constant source of fire. So this guy beat him to it.

8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army

 

For more insight into the practicality of the “Game of Thrones” weapons, check out the link below:

Intel

Marine Corps vet turned Star Wars villain is hilarious in this SNL sketch

Adam Driver’s star is shining bright, thanks to the blockbuster success of Star Wars: The Force Awakens.


Related: Meet the Marine veteran turned ‘Star Wars’ villain

If you’ve seen the flick, then you know that his character, the evil Sith Lord Kylo Ren, has a bit of a temper. Some hilariously associate his character to being emo, which is fitting given the way he spoofed himself on Saturday Night Live. As the sketch goes, Kylo Ren infiltrates Starkiller Base Undercover Boss style as a radar technician to find out what his employees think of him. It turns out that the truth hurts, and Kylo reacts in typical Kylo fashion.

Watch:

MIGHTY MOVIES

6 reasons being a Star Wars rebel soldier sucks

The Star Wars train is still rolling along and the toy shelves are filled with those freaking adorably annoying porgs (as a true Star Wars fan, I personally hope that they don’t become the new Jar-Jar).


 

8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army
Who was really the new Ewoks, who were really just vermin, despite what my editor thinks.

 

A while back, we touched on the downside of being a Stormtrooper and why they have it worst. Now, let’s look at why the rebels are a very close second.

Related: 6 Reasons why it would suck to be a Stormtrooper in Star Wars

In the The Force Awakens, Finn left the previously mentioned terrible First Order and joined the Resistance, a successor to the Rebellion in all but name. The poor guy doesn’t even know that he just traded one terrible assignment for another.

At least Stormtroopers had a few things going for them, such as armor, reliable gear, force of numbers…

The rebels out “fighting the good fight” had next to nothing in nearly everything.

Here’s why it sucks to be a rebel:

1. Very little funding…

Good will can take you a long way against an evil empire, but you still need financing.

Those blasters aren’t just going to buy themselves. Historically, rebellions (in our galaxy) have been financed via a combination of three sources: Other governments, wealthy sympathizers, or outright stealing what they needed.

There aren’t really many options for the Rebel Alliance as far as governments or sympathizers go. When the Galactic Empire called themselves the Galactic Empire, they meant it. Nearly every government in the galaxy fell underneath Emperor Palpatine’s control.

You can’t just turn to the Hutt-controlled space in the Outer Rim for financing because scum and villainy just don’t care about noble causes. The rebels did have an extremely wealthy donor in Bail Organa (Princess Leia’s adoptive father)…but he and his wealth were destroyed on Alderaan.

So, if you estimate the Earth’s total combined wealth at $241 trillion in 2014 and multiply that by the god-knows-how-many planets under the Empire’s control, do you think it’s possible to steal enough stuff to stand a reasonable chance against an enemy that rich?

8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army
Who knows? Maybe this dude was just THAT freaking loaded.

 

2. …which means little gear and training.

The Stormtroopers had acclimatizing suits that were designed to stop blaster shots. The rebels wore…blue shirts and vests. The Stormtroopers had a blaster rifle that works as a machine gun, rifle, and sniper rifle. The rebels stole a few of the same. The Empire had massive fleets of TIE fighters and pilots at their disposal. The Rebels had outdated X-Wings with only a handful of pilots.

And it keeps going on.

8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army
These guys were screwed before Darth Vader showed up.

 

3. They’re painted as the villain – because some are.

The problem with being the Rebel Alliance was that it was loosely-formed from many rebels doing their own thing. This was most prominent during the events of Rogue One, where the rebels struggled to keep Saw Gerrera from giving the wrong impression of what the rebellion means.

Related: This is why Rogue One’s Saw Gerrera was basically bin Laden

It’s not too clear how the average citizen of the Galactic Empire feels about the rebellion. The closest we get in the films is when Luke talked about joining the Imperial flight program, and no one reacted as if the Imperials were the bad guys.

Albeit, their opinions did change after the destruction of Alderaan.

8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army
You can’t convince me that this scene in Rogue One was not ripped directly from a regular day in Kandahar, Afghanistan.

4. Little to no chain of command.

Sure, the pilots get fancy pep talks and are often given commands, but that barely constitutes good advice, let alone a real military order.

Take the Battle of Hoth, for instance. One of the three major rebel bases was under attack and needed to be evacuated. The duty of making sure everyone made it out alive fell entirely on the shoulders of a princess who hadn’t demonstrated any military capabilities until that point.

There were actual generals there, and yet her plan to fly weaponless transport ships full of high ranking officers directly at the enemies didn’t raise a red flag to anyone.

8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army
Literally an infinite amount of directions to chose from, but nah. Let’s risk it.

 

Even still, most rebels just acted on their own free will rather than having some actual military decorum. What would you expect from a chain of command that was literally made up of six officer ranks?

Which leads us to…

5. Rank makes no sense.

Case in point: Han Solo. A man who laughed at the Rebellion eventually gave in and helped his new friend. He flew in at the last minute, shot out Darth Vader’s TIE fighter, and earned a medal from the Princess. Got it. It makes some sense to why he’d become Captain Solo by the time of the Battle of Hoth.

We can forgive the battlefield commission/promotion to Captain, even if he wasn’t nearly as much help as Skywalker. The real concern is how he got promoted to General before the Battle of Endor. He didn’t really do anything but fly around space before being captured on Cloud City and imprisoned in carbonite.

When he was released and reunited with the Rebel forces, he was automatically granted the rank of General.

 

8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army
Eh. If it works…

In the U.S. military, POWs are promoted with their contemporaries while captured and we stretch things in Star Wars to assume it worked the same way. But seriously? Did enough captains get promoted to general in the span of a year to warrant Han being promoted that quickly?

6. No recognition.

All of that can be explained away as the fighting spirit of the rebellion. Sure, they terrible gear, inexperienced leaders, and wacky organization, but at least you could hold true to the knowledge that they were doing what was right. Too bad the “Empire” turned into the “First Order.”

But your contemporaries will remember you? Right?

Nope. All of that glory went to some civilian contractor (Luke), a seriously unqualified General (Han), and the inexperienced (though highly motivated) adopted daughter of the guy who pays the bills (Leia).

8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army
Fighting in the rebellion is so stressful that the dude with the beard is actually 36.

MIGHTY MOVIES

David Harbour’s dad bod is the real star of the new ‘Black Widow’ trailer

The latest trailer for Black Widow has doubled-down on some dad bod cosplay, and I couldn’t be happier. Yes, the newest preview for Scarlett Johansson’s standalone Marvel movie is looking more and more like a James Bond movie, which is great, but the real question is, when is Black Widow’s fake dad going to get his own movie?


In case you missed it, back in December, we got our initial glimpse of David Harbour as the “Red Guardian” in the first trailer for Black Widow. But weren’t we all a little distracted by Baby Yoda and holiday shopping back then? Yeah. I was, too. Now we can get back to what really matters: thinking about David Harbour as Red Guardian and wondering if he is really Black Widow’s dad. Technically speaking, in the comics, Red Guardian is a character whose real name is usually Alexei Shostakov. In some of the old comics, Alexei Shostakov was married to Natasha Romanova, a.k.a. Black Widow. Obviously, Harbour’s version of this character isn’t married to Scarjo, and he acts way more like her dad. In all likelihood, he is not her dad biologically. But in terms of her Russian secret agent family, it seems like Red Guardian is about as dadcore as it gets.

Marvel Studios’ Black Widow | Special Look

www.youtube.com

To be clear, the reason why Red Guardian has a costume that emulates Captain America is that’s what Red Guardian was supposed to be: the Russian version of Cap. The old comic book backstory mostly suggests that unlike Cap, there was no super serum involved, so Red Guardian doesn’t have any superpowers. That is until David Harbour came along and added Dadbod to the list of superpowers possessed by the Red Guardian. In the new trailer (you can watch it above) Red Guardian describes what we’re seeing as “water weight,” and we totally get it. Same man. Same.

Not only will Black Widow finally give Scarjo’s titular character her long-overdue solo movie, but it also seems like the Marvel Cinematic Universe is continuing to court its not-so-secret core demographic, as DadBod Red Guardian follows in the footsteps of DadBod Thor. Lots of dads might want to be Cap or Falcon, but there are also plenty who would settle to be Red Guardian.

This article originally appeared on Fatherly. Follow @FatherlyHQ on Twitter.

MIGHTY CULTURE

‘The Mandalorian’ episode 8 recap: This is the Why

The eighth chapter is finally here and this time it’s directed by Thor: Ragnarok’s Taika Waititi – and it’s everything you thought a Star War directed by Taika Waititi would be. Everything we hoped it might be.

Even the scout troopers got a touch of personality in this episode. Consider this your spoiler warning.


8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army

With an appearance by Jason Sudeikis and Adam Pally.

(LucasFilm)

In this chapter of The Mandalorian, we learn a lot about Our Mandalorian. After we learn the scout troopers have murdered Kuiil and taken the Yoda Baby. We see one of the troopers actually punch the Yoda Baby before getting murdered themselves by the avenging nurse droid, IG-11. Back in the city, we find the heroes still trapped by a legion of Stormtroopers, led by everyone’s favorite villain Giancarlo Esposito, Moff Gideon, who gives them until nightfall to decide if they’re going to cooperate with the Imperial leader’s demands.

IG-11 rides into town like a one-droid army on a speeder bike, dropping stormtrooper bodies all over the streets until he reaches the square where our heroes are pinned down. IG, with the Yoda Baby on his back, continues his rampage as our pinned-down heroes break out of the building. Our Mandalorian even picks up an E-Web Heavy Repeating Blaster that looks like something Carl Weathers might have used in Predator.

8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army

(LucasFilm)

But before this amazing gunfight takes place, we learn a lot about our heroes – from Moff Gideon. It turns out the Moff was more than just an Imperial leader, but was part of an intelligence network. He knew the names of Cara Dune, and that she was from Alderaan, which explains why she hated the Empire so much. We also learn Our Mandalorian has a name, Din Djarin and he wasn’t born on Mandalore. In fact, Mandalorian isn’t even a race, it’s a creed. More importantly, we learn how Our Mandalorian became Mandalorian and why the Yoda Baby means so much to him.

In a flashback, we learn Djarin’s village and his parents were massacred by B2 Super Battle Droids when he was a boy. Just before meeting his own death at the hands of these droids, the young Djarin is rescued by a band of Mandalorian warriors who destroy the droids and carry the young boy off, presumably to Mandalore. Back on Nevarro, however, things look grim for our heroes.

Until the Yoda Baby comes into play.

8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army

“I’ma stop you right there.”

(LucasFilm)

Moff Gideon critically wounds Our Mandalorian by shooting the power cell of the E-Web blaster. He is rescued by his compatriots but they are once again trapped in the building with certain death outside. As Our Mandalorian lays dying, he refuses Dune’s help as it would require removing his helmet. IG-11 opens the sewer grate right as an Incinerator Stormtrooper walks in to blast the room. Instead of burning the room, however, the flames blast him right out the door, thanks to the Yoda Baby, who stepped up to defend his injured father. Once all the humanoids are in the sewer, IG-11 convinces Djarin that since the droid is not alive, he can take his helmet off to receive medical treatment and for the first time, we see our antihero’s face.

Once healed and looking for the Mandalorians in the sewer, they instead find the remnants of their armor. The remaining Mandalorians had been hunted or killed after the Imperials arrived, though some may have escaped. The Armorer survived, however, and after hearing about the Yoda Baby’s strange powers, tells Djarin about the Jedi. Unable to determine the baby’s race, Karga reminds Djarin that his mission will now be to raise the baby or find his home world – reminding him that “this is the way.”

She also give him his earned signet. Oh, and a jetpack called “Rising Phoenix.” She tells them the way out and covers their exit with the dopest slaughter of stormtroopers seen in the Star Wars universe since IG-11 and the Yoda Baby in the town square fifteen minutes before.

8 Marvel super heroes that served in the US Army

Can we talk about this most brutal stormtrooper kill?

(LucasFilm)

Our heroes make their way down a river of lava, thanks to a boat propelled by a droid. IG-11 sacrifices himself so that the group isn’t killed by a platoon of stormtroopers waiting to ambush them, and then Mando takes on Moff Gideon flying a TIE Fighter, thanks to his handy new jetpack. Every thing is reset for season 2, as Cara Dune decides to stay on Nevarro and become a member of the Guild and Karga forgives Mando, offering him the choice picks of the bounty hunter jobs.

But our Mandalorian is now a full warrior, with a mission. He returns to his ship and flies into the sunset, presumably determined to find the Yoda Baby’s home.

Articles

This retired Navy pilot rocks the nation with speed metal karaoke at 82 years old

John Hetlinger left the Navy pilot ranks for aerospace engineering. He succeeded in that field, working for NASA on the Hubble Space Telescope for NASA before retiring in his late 60s.


That’s when he got into karaoke, singing at karaoke bars in pleated shorts and pants and nice polo shirts. He’s apparently got a thing for polos with toucans, which is kind of sweet.

Oh, but the songs he sings are heavy metal, and Drowning Pool’s “Bodies” appears to be one of his favorites to perform:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BfR5O2PXzfc
That’s Hetlinger on his recently aired episode of “America’s Got Talent” where he wowed the judges with his performance. You can see Hetlinger perform a longer version of the song, where he includes some profanity, in this 2014 show from when he was a spry 80 years old.
(H/T NPR)
MIGHTY MOVIES

Rumor says Ghost Rider is on his way to the Avengers

You might have noticed that the ranks of the Avengers are a bit thinner than before. Iron Man and Black Widow died, Captain America retired, and Spider-Man fell victim to…a corporate squabble between Sony and Disney. Kevin Feige, the president of Marvel Studios, knows this.

The only question, then, isn’t if the Avengers will get some reinforcements but which characters from the Marvel canon those reinforcements will be. According to Daniel Richtman, a writer with a history of Marvel scoops, Feige wants Ghost Rider to be among those joining the MCU.


What’s less clear is which Ghost Rider we’re going to get. Will it be Johnny Blaze, who sold his soul to save his father and subsequently rode around on a flaming motorcycle? Or could it be Danny Ketch, who found a mystical motorcycle the night his sister was murdered?

As a side note, it was the Johnny Blaze version that Nicholas Cage played in 2007’s Ghost Rider and its 2011 sequel Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance. The absolute nuttiest thing Feige could do would be bringing Cage back and making those two pretty forgettable movies MCU canon. But we’re not holding our breath.

Another possibility is that Robbie Reyes, a Mexican-American from East L.A. who rides around in a black muscle car instead of a motorcycle, comes on board.

We also shouldn’t discount the fact that, in the modern MCU where there are, really, no rules (remember the snap?), that we get more than one Ghost Rider at once. There could be a movie version based on Johnny Blaze and a TV series centering on Robbie Reyes simultaneously.

The truth is we just don’t know yet, and we’ll probably have to wait a while to both confirm that Ghost Rider is joining the Avengers and learn which Ghost Rider (and on which medium) he or she will be appearing.

This article originally appeared on Fatherly. Follow @FatherlyHQ on Twitter.

Articles

Special operators take the fight to the drug cartels in ‘Ghost Recon: Wildlands’ trailer

In the world of “Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon: Wildlands,” the U.S. government has had enough of the shenanigans of the South American drug cartels and has dispatched their deadliest operators to kill the snake by cutting off its head.


The newly released trailer focuses on the tactics and capabilities of the “Ghosts,” Clancy’s fictional spec-ops creation and the subject of his games and novels dating back to 2001. So far, we know that “Wildlands” will allow small teams of players to fight in battlefields modelled after the Bolivian jungle.

Game developer Ubisoft Paris clearly wants to paint ‘Wildlands’ as a smarter alternative to more aggressive offerings from the Call of Duty and Battlefield franchises, and to that end the trailer showcases the Ghosts using an assortment of tactics and technology — stealth takedowns, scout drones, etc. — to overpower the cartels’ lethal enforcers.

Check out the trailer below:

Intel

This video perfectly shows what happens when you shop for tactical gear

It’s that time of the year again. Holiday leave, time with the family, no shaving and presents!


Whether you’re shopping for a buddy or self-gifting, finding the perfect piece of kit for your rifle is tough. You could ask your friends, visit online forums or ask Jean-Pierre.

Related: Watch this man teach you now to reload in the worst possible way

Jean-Pierre knows the struggle. Gear is expensive and the possibilities are seemingly endless. But don’t stress, just sing along with him and stick to a vision.

Watch:

Do Not Sell My Personal Information