5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ - We Are The Mighty
MIGHTY SURVIVAL

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

So you’re stuck inside, and it kind of sucks — just a slight understatement, really. For many, Covid-19 is a life-changing (or crushing, even) event, so those of us whose biggest worry is remembering what day it is and making ourselves put on real pants, doing something is highly encouraged.

Also recommended? Breaking up the monotony with a challenge. When every day feels like Wednesday, becoming one with your couch is tempting. The couch doesn’t care. It’s a couch. You, on the other hand, probably will care when endless hours of Netflix leaves you with major brain fog. Try these activities to stay sharp. If you do them every day, you may get out of quarantine smarter than you were before!


Run sprints

Or jump rope, try a Zumba class on YouTube, or do a HIIT workout. It doesn’t matter what activity you pick, as long as it elevates your heart rate. Lifting weights can improve muscle tone and bone density, but aerobic activities are the ones that give your brain a boost. In some studies, sprinting was more effective at improving IQ than playing brain-training games. In other words, if you’d like to get smarter without thinking about it, just go for a run! Your brain will thank you, and your couch potato butt probably will too.

Bring out the chessboard

I’m not a huge fan of chess. Trying to remember what all the little people do bugs me. I want to make the knight elope with the queen in a scandalous twist, but apparently that’s not how you play. If you play by the rules, however, it’s amazing for your brain. The strategy involved exercises both hemispheres of your brain and strengthens the connection between them, which is amazing for increasing mental acuity. The moral of the story? Don’t play chess like me.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

Review your high school French textbook

Few of us learned a language fluently in high school, but we probably should have. Learning a new language helps you better understand how your native language works and changes how you think for the better. It also reduces the likelihood of developing dementia later in life. Oh…and it’s pretty hot.

Brush off the dust on your guitar

Learning an instrument is similar to learning a language, except the language sounds extra awesome. Like learning a language, it uses both sides of your brain and gives your memory a workout, with the added benefit of strengthening your coordination and speeding up sensory processing. So what if you sound terrible at first? It’s fun and good for your stressed out, underutilized noggin.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

Sleep

In high school, I tried to convince my mom that I couldn’t study without a nap. It turns out I wasn’t too far off. (Suck it, mom!) While you admittedly can’t review history notes while unconscious, your brain consolidates memories while you sleep. Not getting enough zzz’s is a surefire way to slow down the learning process, and if it gets bad enough you can actually start losing IQ points– about one point lost for every hour of sleep you lose each night.

Welp, guess it’s time to do some jumping jacks, torture my neighbors with mediocre violin and take a nap. Maybe I’ll wake up a little smarter.


MIGHTY HUMOR

Watch: This episode of ‘Cheers’ hilariously nails the pandemic cleaning panic

One of the benefits of quarantine is catching up on every single television show ever made. There’s nothing better than revisiting some of the classics and clearly, Cheers has to make that list. What’s extra entertaining is when these 40-year-old shows accurately predict the future (like these M*A*S*H episodes).

In episode five of season one, Cheers absolutely nails it.


In this episode, titled “Coach’s Daughter,” customer Chuck (played by Tim Cunningham) sits at the bar and tells bartender Sam (Ted Danson) and the Cheers’ regulars that he has a new job at a biology lab. He shares his anxiety about working with mutant viruses and the reaction from the Cheers’ crew couldn’t be any more fitting to what we are experiencing with COVID-19.

Cheers Coronavirus

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Cheers Coronavirus

Cheers ran from 1982 through 1993 with 275 half-hour episodes. Although it was almost cancelled early on, it made it an impressive 11 seasons. Set in a bar in Boston, visiting the friendly location on the airwaves became a weekly household staple, with everyone wanting to visit the place, “Where everybody knows your name.” Cheers earned 26 Emmy Awards, six Golden Globe Awards and many other accolades. It remains one of the best shows in history.

Cheers had several episodes with military-connected plots, although none better than “One for the Book,” which aired December 9, 1982. In this iconic episode, two customers enter the friendly neighborhood establishment, and of course their paths should meet. One is Buzz Crowder played by Ian Wolfe.

Buzz and his buddies from WWI agree to meet every 10 years for a reunion, but just as we see with our WWII veterans present day, Buzz’s peers are dwindling. In this episode, Buzz is the last one left. Luckily for him, you may walk into Cheers alone, but you’ll never leave without making friends. In “One for the Book,” that friend happens to be a young man getting ready to head to the monastery and looking for a night of fun before he becomes a monk.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

Photo: Cheers, NBC Universal

While Cheers ran on NBC, all 275 episodes are now available for streaming on CBS All Access. Start today and we’re confident you can finish the series before the end of quarantine. Or, let’s be honest, by the end of the week.

Cheers!

MIGHTY CULTURE

2020 Armed Forces Insurance Spouse of the Year Fort Bragg rallies support for soldiers in quarantine after deployment

Tiffany Marquis is no stranger to serving her community through volunteerism. Together with her active neighborhood, she’s turned quarantine walks into decorative art treasure hunts with sidewalk chalk displays, massive egg hunts, and even painted sign photo ops.

When Marquis learned from another Family Readiness Group leader that troops were seeking resources for incoming troops facing quarantine after deployment, she quickly pulled resources together.


“Another FRG leader had seen my spouse of the year Facebook page and thought I might be able to help her and reached out. We had never met before, but this is just what you do. We are all here for the same mission, the same cause,” said Marquis.

All returning soldiers were facing a 14-day quarantine in the barracks no matter what their living or marital status was.

“You want them to be comfortable. You want to make what they are going through easier if you can,” Marquis said.

Marquis called upon her contact at NC Packs 4 Patriots, a nonprofit organization supporting service members and families out of North Carolina through care and comfort item donations.

“I met the organization at a back to school drive years earlier. Immediately you get the understanding that they are there to help, to show up. When I called them, they were immediately on board asking me what I needed,” Marquis said, who volunteers her time at the organization whenever possible.

Marquis didn’t stop at calling upon just one organization; she put the ask out to her community Facebook page where the group has regularly shown up for each other throughout the pandemic.

“People were excited to help however they could. Within a few days I had over 15 packs of toilet paper and facial tissue.” While these items may seem obvious on the list of comfort, given the scarcity of local stockpiles nationwide, it speaks volumes to the love and selflessness of those contributing to the project.

“Not only did we get hygiene kits, but we had plenty of favorite snack items donated as well,” she explained. Snacks represent normalcy in America for soldiers. Receiving the comforts of home upon arrival is one small way to help with the reintegration process.

The efforts of Marquis and her neighborhood throughout this tough season is a prime example of how capable and strong the military community is no matter what obstacle they are facing. “We weren’t going to let this pandemic stop us from supporting each other,” stated Marquis confidently.

“The FRG overall is a team. As a leader your goal is to support the unit however you can throughout deployments, homecomings, or with fundraisers.” Marquis and the FRG leader who reached out for support are now mutually invested in the success of each other and their missions, exchanging help and resources to rise to meet the need.

In uncertain times and with plenty of units across all service branches facing similar situations, the example set here is one to follow.

“It starts with one person,” Marquis shared. “One person to form a team and the team then moving forward in the right direction.”

MIGHTY SURVIVAL

5 simple tips to help you avoid the ‘Quarantine 15’

If you’ve been sitting at home bingeing on Doritos and MRE lemon pound cake and think you’re not going to gain weight, you’re sorely mistaken.

Now, the time to establish a new routine is upon you, at least, if you want to avoid excessive weight gain as a result of sitting on your butt and snacking during this quarantine.


Fortunately, some amount of snacking is acceptable. Still, to avoid gaining too much weight, you should consider a few tips to keep your calorie intake in check.

Here are a few good ideas to help you out.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

Shop for it first too. This is a nice kit that prioritizes fiber and complex carbs first.

U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. William Gizara

1. Eat important food first

Sure, it’s okay to eat some chips and maybe a few cookies from time to time. But if you’re eating these kinds of foods in excess every day that you’re locked in your home, you’re going to gain weight in the bad way, not the good way.

The funny thing is, this tip is so simple and logical. It’s so simple that most people don’t even consider it.

If you’ve found that your will power to eat healthy food has declined during this quarantine, a simple trick is to eat healthy first.

If you’re tempted by high-calorie snacks like chips or cookies or even craving pizza during your downtime, try to fill up first with healthier foods. Foods like cottage cheese, a salad, some jerky or a protein shake are all great options.

Even though these foods might not be your first choice when you’re craving sweets, eating them first can help fill you up. As a result, you’ll eat less junk food.

Better yet, you’ll fill up on foods high in protein and fiber, which is a smart move always.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

Apples last a long time and are so sweet these days that you could hardly tell the difference between one and candy with you eyes closed… and no idea what what candy tastes like.

Photo by Michelle Gordon

2. Stock up on healthy snacks

If you know that you’re snacking more than usual during your quarantine, make a compromise to “snack healthy” as often as you can.

For example, snacks like jerky, fruit, rice cakes, veggie chips, nuts in moderation, and other protein snacks are good alternatives to traditional junk food snacks.

Best of all, you can even make great tasting snacks that are healthy too.

Another healthy idea is to make small “egg muffins” by using a muffin tray and cracking an egg into each slot. Then, add small amounts of tomato, spinach, broccoli, and diced ham before baking. These muffins are a great way to snack on something savory while prioritizing healthy proteins, fats, and fiber from the vegetables.

Also consider some keto friendly snacks if you’re really trying to stay away from sugars and carbs.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

Just write it down so you can keep track. We all know counting gets harder after that 3rd beer.

Courtesy photo by Spc. Harrison Clark

3. Pay attention to alcohol use

If you drink, there’s a strong chance you’ve felt the urge to drink a little more during this time of self-isolation.

There’s nothing wrong with drinking in moderation. But drinking too much with reduced activity can increase your chance of gaining weight and developing bad habits.

If you do drink, do your best to be conscientious about your use and avoid pairing it too often with high-calorie options.

Pro Tip: To prevent a hangover consider day drinking… seriously! Here’s why.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

If you’re not training… you’re wrong. That should be abundantly clear by now.

U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Garret Smith

4. Earn your snacks

Typically, telling someone to “earn” junk food is a bad idea because it can create bad habits and an unhealthy relationship with food.

However, times are a bit different now. Staying at home more means it’s easier to be lazier. As a result, it’s not a bad idea to earn your snacks if it helps you stay active.

Of course, it’s a smart idea to moderate your snacking regardless of exercising or not.

But, if you’re less active and eating more, it might be helpful to make exercise mandatory before you indulge. Just take this suggestion for what it’s worth and return to your regular habits once these quarantine orders pass.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

This is the opposite of high volume low calorie. Steak sandwich is high fat, high carb, high calorie, low fiber. It’s one saving grace is the steak.

U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Webster Rison

5. Fill up on high volume, low-calorie foods

Popcorn should be your best friend during this quarantine.

Why? Because popcorn offers a ton of food volume to fill your stomach, has fiber, and is low-calorie. Unless, of course, it’s drenched in butter. Opt for the kind you do in a pot on your stovetop, not the microwavable version.

Plus, it tastes incredible.

All of these variables mean that it will help fill you up but not break your calorie allowance for the day.

But there are more options than popcorn:

  • Cottage cheese
  • Berries
  • Greek yogurt
  • Salad with low-calorie dressing
  • Raw veggies with a little ranch dressing
  • Whole fruit (avoid juice)

Even though these foods do have calories, these are good options for filling up while keeping those calories low.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

Just be mindful of how you shop. If you buy crap you’ll eat like crap.

Photo by 1st Lt. Daniel de La Fe

These are obvious…. I know.

​If you said to yourself at any point in this article something like: “No shit! This is basic stuff.” then I encourage you to actually reflect on if you actively do some of these.

If so, let me know at michael@composurefitness.comand tell me how you actually implement these tips.

Nine times out of ten we tell ourselves we’re going to do one of these but never take any actual steps to do it. Write it down! Put it on a post it on your fridge or write it on the top of your shopping list next time you go for groceries. Just a little reminder will boost your success rate exponentially.

Quarantine time is the perfect time to start holding yourself to a higher standard, it’s a nice controlled environment.

MIGHTY SURVIVAL

These are the 35 best COVID-19 memes for the week of May 4

We hope you’re not sick or sick of memes, either. Somehow quarantine is dragging on but the memes and tweets still don’t disappoint. Another week, another meme-drop. Stay safe, wash your hands and remember: Laughter is the best medicine. That is, until we have medicine.


5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

1. Walmart

But if there’s one thing we’ve learned in our time in quarantine together… isn’t it that pants are optional?

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

2. Gamers for the win

You sweet little adorable social recluses. At least you’re better at talking to people online than anyone else we know. We’re sorry we never saw this as a skillset.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

3. Chili’s 

True story, Pam. True story.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

4. Panda 

Who needs the freshman 15 when you have the COVID-19?

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

5. Two types of people 

Definitely team carrot cake over here.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

6. Zoom church

The struggle is real.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

7. Wine break!

Of course we’re still watching. What else would we be doing??

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

8. Coffee

We like this a latte.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

9. Self care

You know everyone checks the closets. The car is safe. For now.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

10. Rent

525,600 minutes. In Zoom meetings, in cancelled plans, in meals cooked, and cups of quarantine coffee.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

11. We salad you

And if you need a snack, you’re all set.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

12. Salsa

That’s what I’m taco-ing about.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

13. Devil 

He was willing to make a deal….

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

14. Weekend at Kim’s house

Any chance that guy is just quarantining? No?

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

15. Hugs

Challenge accepted.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

16. Lysol

They’re probably on the black market with the hand sanitizer and TP.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

17. Memes

This one will never get old.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

18. CAROLE BASKIN!

Poor woman is *almost* as hated as a North Korean dictator.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

19. Friends 

Can you imagine social distancing at Central Perk?

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

20. Furby

Poor Furby looks like every dude out there right now.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

21. Peloton

He’s looking pretty smart right about now.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

22. Wilsooonnnnn

Everyone should have that neighbor. Also, please come do all our Home Improvements.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

23. Grapes of mom’s wrath

This history lesson brought to you by Chardonnay.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

24. MURDER HORNETS

Go home 2020. You’re drunk.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

25. Chin up!

Hahaha, noticing the decline in selfies on social media, aren’t ya?

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

26. 2020 progression 

Jokes on all of us.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

27. Lockdown message

You can barely tell.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

28. Introversion 

Living that best solo life. You were born for this.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

29. Please forward

Karen would have sent the message.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

30. Fencing

We hear deuling is pretty good too.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

31. Make the call

#Truth

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

32. Nokia

I mean just how many games of that weird snake situation could you play?

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

33. Elf on the shelf

She dead.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

34. Jurassic Park

“TIMMY GET OFF THE FENCE!”

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

35. Love language

Wine for the win.

Have a great week!

MIGHTY SURVIVAL

Preserving liberty while harnessing the power of data in the age of COVID-19

As COVID-19 spreads across the planet, humanity faces a difficult and deadly trial. Here in the U.S., the best science available predicts hundreds of thousands of Americans will contract the disease. Government officials have already reported that thousands of patients with COVID-19 have died and projected that between 100,000 and 240,000 Americans will eventually die from the virus.

Facing this grim diagnosis will bring out the best in the American people. Character is displayed under pressure. We’re under pressure, and America’s character is strong. We have the discipline and determination to do what is right for our families and communities, even when it is difficult. We have the caring and compassion to help those who are suffering. We have ingenious entrepreneurs and innovative tools – including the ability to gather and process large amounts of data.


And we have the wisdom to know that our character must guide how we use tools, including data-gathering tools, to help us overcome this monumental challenge.

Countries around the world are combatting the spread of coronavirus by collecting and using the location of peoples’ smartphones. This government use of location data – i.e., surveillance – appears to be a powerful tool in the fight against the disease, but also raises a host of privacy concerns. The U.S. shouldn’t blindly copy other countries’ practices. Instead, we can and should find ways to harness the power of big data to protect public health while also protecting the rights of all Americans.

Governments use location data to combat COVID-19 in two ways. They use it for “contact tracing,” to identify all the people a sick person has encountered. Most do this by assembling a massive database of the movements of every person, sick or healthy. South Korea has been especially aggressive on this front, collecting data from infected citizens’ credit cards, GPS systems, and cellphones to determine their location and interactions with other citizens. Singapore has created an app that collects information about nearby phones over Bluetooth, focusing on who the user has been near, rather than where. No comprehensive database of locations is required.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

The other purpose for which countries are using location data is to enforce social distancing or quarantine requirements. The South Korean government mandates that quarantined individuals download an app that tracks their location, enabling the government to detect when individuals break their quarantine restrictions. Governments in China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Russia also use smartphone apps, geofencing, and facial-recognition technology to enforce quarantine restrictions on individuals.

While we don’t have comprehensive data on the effectiveness of these various approaches, it does appear that digital surveillance can help governments “flatten the curve” and slow the spread of COVID-19.

But when governments use these tools, they do so at the cost of their citizens’ privacy. This tradeoff is not surprising. Because information about people is useful for many purposes, tradeoffs between privacy and other values are common. Privacy values often clash with openness, competition, and innovation. But rarely are the tradeoffs so dramatic.

Calibrating these tradeoffs in advance is difficult. There is evidence that existing U.S. privacy laws hindered the use of valuable medical information, slowing the initial response to the virus. Specifically, university researchers in Washington state were delayed by weeks in their efforts to repurpose already-gathered patient data to study the growing COVID-19 pandemic. This is one reason laws that restrict private sector use of data should allow beneficial uses, including using data to improve health and save lives.

But even when fighting real, tangible harms like death and disease, unwarranted government surveillance without due process unacceptably threatens liberty. That’s why our Constitution and our values limit what government can do even when pursuing important goals. These privacy-protecting institutions are our country’s antibodies against government overreach and abuse.

Fortunately, we don’t have to give up our liberties to use big data tools in the fight against COVID-19. Rather than assemble giant databases of personal information like South Korea or China has, U.S. government public health experts should use anonymized location data not linked to individuals. Such data can help researchers assess how well populations are practicing social distancing, identify hotspots of activity that raise the risk of spreading the disease, and study how the disease has spread. (Reports indicate that health officials are already using anonymized mobile advertising data for these purposes and some private companies are offering free-to-use tools to help decisionmakers). We should also explore decentralized approaches to contact tracing, like the Singaporean app. Civic-minded individuals who want to volunteer their data for research purposes should be encouraged to do so, perhaps through public education campaigns.

In any case, U.S. health officials must protect our privacy by ensuring that any data collected for use in this current health crisis isn’t repurposed for other government uses. And both businesses and governments involved in this effort must tell the public how data is being collected, shared, and used.

The U.S. has the world’s best innovators in using data to improve Americans’ lives. We can, and should, empower those innovators to fight the spread of COVID-19 consistent with our strong American values and character.

This article originally appeared on Real Clear Defense. Follow @RCDefense on Twitter.

MIGHTY CULTURE

6 ways to honor Memorial Day during COVID-19 pandemic

Memorial Day is often a conflicting moment for those of us with friends or loved ones who were killed during military service. Traditionally, the three-day weekend has been celebrated in America as the unofficial summer kick-off — a time for sales events and parties.

For those of us who remember the fallen, however, the weekend is bittersweet. Some honor it with service while some prefer solitude. Others gather with friends to celebrate the lives of lost companions.

With COVID-19 numbers remaining dangerously high (at the time of publishing, the CDC reports 1,551,095 total U.S. cases — 22,860 new cases compared to the day before — and 93,061 total deaths — 1,397 new dates compared to the day before), it still isn’t safe to pay tribute the way we might prefer.

Here are some ways to honor the holiday during the quarantine:


(Let this double as your weekend safety brief; while states are slowly reopening and we can go out, it isn’t necessarily safe to do so — and while we all feel invincible, let’s remember the military core value of putting others before ourselves, lest we risk becoming an asymptomatic carrier who exposes someone at risk to a fatal infection.)

Salute Across America

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1. Salute Across America — Saturday, May 23, 2020

Salute Across America will be a first-of-its-kind live stream honoring fallen service members. Prominent veteran companies such as Kill Cliff, Combat Flip Flops, Nine Line Apparel, Grunt Style and many more are joining forces to send a message of gratitude for those who have defended our freedoms while promoting togetherness during this time of isolation.

During the live stream, New York Times Best Selling Author John Brenkus will be joined by influencers and celebrities including NFL Hall of Famer Ray Lewis, MMA Legend Randy Couture, actors Donnie Whalberg and Jenny McCarthy, Bruce Arians, Dan Quinn, Nate Boyer, Jay Glazer, Rich Salgado and musicians Ryan Weaver, Tim Montana, Joey McIntyre, Ted Nugent and Jesse Hughes.

Viewers will have the opportunity to simply click a link and make a donation. Likewise, the Salute Across America webpage will have links to the military charities supported by the companies behind this initiative in an effort to drive awareness and donations for some incredible non-profits doing great work to support our troops, including the Navy SEAL Foundation.

[instagram https://www.instagram.com/p/CAfxuxHhLSZ/ expand=1]Login • Instagram

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2. Take The Murph Challenge — Monday May 25, 2020

The Murph Challenge is an annual fundraiser that raises funds for the LT. Michael P. Murphy Memorial Scholarship Foundation in honor of Mike Murphy, a U.S. Navy SEAL and Medal of Honor recipient who was killed in action on June 28, 2005.

This Memorial Day tradition will continue on May 25, 2020, where participants are invited to complete the Crossfit Hero WOD (workout of the day) ‘MURPH’ then return to TheMurphChallenge.com to submit their ‘MURPH’ time and compare their achievements with those of others around the world. All times will be displayed on a worldwide leaderboard and the top five men and top five women will be recognized for their efforts.

Since 2014, the foundation has raised over id=”listicle-2646068043″,000,000 in addition to bringing the community together to push each other and pay tribute to LT. Michael P. Murphy.

[instagram https://www.instagram.com/p/CAWEs6HJuM4/ expand=1]Login • Instagram

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3. Volunteer with Team Rubicon

Team Rubicon has been actively responding to the COVID-19 pandemic by launching initiatives to help local communities. Called #NeighborsHelpingNeighbors, Team Rubicon volunteers have activated to meet the needs of their communities through safe individual acts of service.

“During this time of the COVID-19 crisis, many people are unable to access and afford their most basic needs, including food. Team Rubicon and Patient Advocate Foundation have partnered to provide emergency food assistance to those who have cancer, Multiple Sclerosis or Rheumatoid Arthritis, and have been affected by COVID-19.

Most military veterans took their oath to serve because they felt the call to take action and help others. Finding “service after service” is healing and therapeutic for vets — and Memorial Day is a perfect time to answer the call once more.

The greatest beer run in the history of beer | Drink Like a Sailor

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4. Host a “Virtual Cook-Out”

Stoke the fire, grill or cook up your favorite summer foods, and jump on a Zoom or Google Hangout with your friends. Memorial Day is about remembering the fallen and raising a glass in their honor. The act of cooking or grilling is a great way to pass the time — and talking with friends is a cathartic experience for anyone grieving a loss.

Talk about the people you lost. Share their stories online. Acknowledge how it feels to miss them. Take comfort in the virtual company of your friends.

You’ve been eating enough microwave food — give yourself the gift of a home-cooked meal and enjoy.

5. Go to a Drive-In Movie

Parks, trails and beaches sound great after you’ve been cooped up inside, but face masks and the aerosol range of potentially contagious partiers really puts a damper on the experience. Still, if you’re craving an experience out of the house to boost your mood, find a local outdoor movie theater and catch a flick.

Drive-In Movie Theaters are making a comeback with safety restrictions in place to help protect people. Viewers remain in their vehicles, which are parked further apart. Anyone entering restroom facilities must wear masks and most locations are limiting the number of people allowed in the restroom at any given time.

This makes a great date to enjoy with anyone you’ve been sheltering in place with. It’s also an opportunity to park near your buddies and either live-text or zoom together from car-to-car. The shared experience and change of pace can give you just the kind of morale boost you’ve been craving.

6. Donate to your favorite veteran non-profit organization

Many nonprofits are working hard to stay afloat and continue their initiatives. If you have money to spare, consider making a contribution to causes you believe in. If you’re also hurting financially, share their content online and show your support.

We’re going to be separated for a while longer — but that doesn’t mean we’re alone. Whatever you do this Memorial Day weekend, reach out to your friends, take care of each other and stay safe.

MIGHTY MILSPOUSE

Should kids go back to school this fall? Parents are divided.

Should we send our kids back to school this fall? It’s a question that’s on every parent’s mind, regardless of which schools are re-opening. The big issue is one of children’s safety and COVID-19. But this poses many smaller questions to consider. How will the health of students and teachers be monitored? Are schools well ventilated and capable of proper sanitizing? Are school nurses prepared? How will they rearrange classrooms? Will masks be provided for students and teachers? What about some sort three-days-off, three-days-on hybrid of remote and in-person learning? Are buses and drivers ready for social distancing? Will schools help students who don’t have access to strong internet meet the requirements for remote learning?


There are no easy answers to any of these questions. The variables are too numerous; so are the unknowns. Yes, school districts across the country are working hard to create reopening plans and contingency plans should they not be able to. But, as we’ve learned over the past six months, COVID doesn’t really care about plans.

So, considering all this, what are parents thinking? We spoke to a dozen fathers about whether or not they’ll be sending their kids back to school in the fall. Some think that schools will meet standards and plan on sending their kids; others lack the confidence of the school and other families and plan on keeping their kids at home. There is no right or wrong decision here. Instead, there’s merely a long list of pros and cons that are allowing parents to make their best decisions as of right now. And, of course, those decisions could change tomorrow, or in a week, or on the first day of the 2020-2021 school year. The only certainty right now is uncertainty.

Yes. The Schools Been Doing Everything Properly, So Far

“My son’s school — a private Catholic school — ran a summer camp during all of this, and I’ve been very impressed with the precautions they’ve taken to make sure everyone is safe. The kids, teachers and counselors all wash and sanitize every 10 or 15 minutes, and there’s not a surface in sight that isn’t wiped down or disinfected. All of the staff wears masks, and it’s clear that everyone is taking things seriously. If the camp is any indication of how a school day would run, I wouldn’t have any problem trusting them with my kids. They’ve shown me that health and safety are a top priority, which is more than I can say for a lot of other schools in the area.” – Chris, 34, Ohio

No. I Don’t Feel Confident At All. 

“If I could reply to this question with that meme of Randy Jackson saying, ‘That’s gonna be a no from me, dawg’, I would. There are just too many variables in play to make me feel safe or confident. Even if all of the teachers wear masks, and sanitize everything, it literally only takes one negligent or selfish person to spread COVID to someone else, who can then bring it into the school. From there, it’d just be a catastrophe. I think that’s why I’d say no. I know most of the parents of kids in my daughter’s class, and I don’t trust them to take this all seriously.” – Josh, 35, Pennsylvania

I’ll Send My Kids Back If They Staff Up and Shrink Class Sizes

“I’ll send my kids back if the plan to shrink class sizes actually happens. That’s the only way I’ll feel safe. Right now, there are 25 kids in my daughter’s kindergarten class. Even without a pandemic, that’s more than enough sneezes, coughs, and booger wipes to spread germs across the entire room. There have been talks of splitting the class in half, which I’d be okay with. It seems manageable, and I feel like the school would take the sanitization and cleaning seriously. So, if they can staff up and find the space to make that plan happen, I’m good with it.” – Nathan, 29, Connecticut

I Don’t Think We’re There Yet

“I don’t think I can. If the school board is having virtual meetings to decide whether or not school is safe to open, instead of meeting in person, what does that say about the safety of opening a school? It doesn’t instill a lot of confidence knowing that the people in charge won’t risk going to a facility, but expect kids and teachers to do it. At the beginning of summer, I was hopeful that things would get worked out by the time school started, but I don’t think we’re there yet. At least not where I feel safe about sending my kids back.” – Patrick, 30, New Hampshire

We Will Send Him Back. He’s Lost So Much Progress.

“Our son will go back. He has autism, and the daily social interactions and academic instruction are essential to his development. It terrifies me how much progress we may have lost thanks to the schools shutting down last year. The virtual learning was fine, but he thrives when he can see his friends, and be in an actual classroom. I think the schools will take things seriously, and prioritize safety, so I have no problem sending him back if they reopen.” – Will, 29, Florida

It’s Too Hard to Say Right Now.

“We’re undecided. Everything changes day-to-day. Not just with the school situation, but with the whole pandemic in general. There aren’t any straight, definitive answers. One day it’s calming down, the next day it’s the biggest spike we’ve seen since it started. So, for us, it’s just impossible to make a decision. Obviously, we’d love to plan ahead and say that we definitely will or won’t send our kids back to school. But, how can we realistically do that when there’s just so much uncertainty?” – John, 34, New York

Absolutely Not. I Need A Lot More Reassurance

“No fucking way. That’s how strongly I feel about not sending our kids back to school. There’s absolutely nothing that the local, state, or federal government has done to make me think, ‘Yeah, it seems perfectly safe to send my kids into a building full of a hundred other kids, whose parents I don’t know.’ If I could say, without any shadow of doubt, that I knew every student’s parents were wearing masks, sanitizing, and generally taking this seriously, I’d be first in line when school reopened. But, there’s no way that’s possible. So, I’m going to need a lot more reassurance than some hand sanitizer pumps and bleach wipes in each classroom to take that risk.” – Reed, 34, Ohio

No Way. I Don’t Trust the Other Parents At All.

“Nope. And you know why? I’m Facebook friends with a lot of my son’s classmates’ parents, and I’ve seen plenty of posts that make me realize they’re all idiots. One mom posted a selfie out at a crowded bar. A lot of them are anti-mask. There was one parent who even said something like, ‘I hope my kid gets it, so that he’ll get the antibodies and get it over with!’ And I’m supposed to feel comfortable sending my son to school with these morons’ kids? No way. I’ll be looking for a tutor instead.” – J.C., 33, North Carolina

Yes. But Only Because My Daughter Attends a Small, Private School.

“I think we’ll send our son and daughter back to school if it resumes in the fall. It’s a small, private school – that’s the main reason. Their classes aren’t larger than ten kids, and the teachers have all been very communicative about measures they plan to take should the school year begin on time. I think that’s all a parent can ask in this situation – honesty and the prioritization of safety. If they went to a bigger school, with more students, and more parents we didn’t know, it’d be a different story. But, as far as the school community goes, I think we’re all on the same page regarding what needs to happen when the kids go back.” – Camden, 32, Indiana

I Want to. My Wife Doesn’t. We Still Need to Figure It Out.

“My wife and I disagree about the whole situation. I think it will be fine, honestly. But she’s a catastrophic thinker, and is terrified of one of our daughter’s classmates showing up like the monkey from Outbreak and hacking COVID all over everyone. I know a lot of teachers in our district. I went to high school with a few of them. And they all seem to think that schools will inevitably reopen. If that’s the case, I can’t imagine everyone involved not taking every single precaution to prevent anything from happening. Maybe I’m naive about it. Maybe my wife is overreacting. Hopefully we can figure it out when the time comes.” – Greg, 39, Oregon

If There’s Some Sort of Hybrid School Model, Then Yes.

“If there’s a hybrid virtual/in-person learning model in place, I think we’ll send our daughter back to school. We were very impressed with how the school handled the early closing by transitioning everything to online learning. So, we know it’s a possible, viable option. But, we also know that sitting in front of a computer isn’t the same as being in a classroom with your friends, learning how to play and interact. There’s been talk of three days in class, two days learning from home, which I think would be a good way to go. At least to see what happened. I think a lot of schools and parents are looking at this as an either/or situation. We send them back full time, or we don’t. But, it doesn’t have to be like that, and we think this would be a safe, effective compromise.” – Alan, 38, South Carolina

I Know It’s Risky, But They’ll Be Going Back. 

“Even though I know it’s risky, I think the face-to-face element of school needs to be there, especially at such a young age. My son actually loved the online learning he did at the end of last school year. I think that’s because it was a novelty. It was like FaceTiming your friends all at once, which was fun, and cool, and a great substitute for in-person learning. Mentally, I think the kids need to be around other kids. They truly have no idea what’s going on right now, and these are incredibly formative years for elementary school children. I think that taking the proper precautions, combined with a vigilant attitude, will allow schools to resume effectively. And I trust them to do that.” – Steve, 37, Georgia

This article originally appeared on Fatherly. Follow @FatherlyHQ on Twitter.

MIGHTY MILSPOUSE

These are the 50 best COVID-19 memes for the week of April 13

Another week of quarantine, another round of memes. The Tiger King references are slowing down since 99% of the population has already seen it, made fun of it and determined Carol Baskin is actually THE WORST. But the rest of the problems in the world are still very much being leveraged for a little dark humor.

Hope you and your families are staying safe, washing your hands and have plenty of liquor and TP.


5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

1. Stop the throwbacks 

I’m sure them seeing you smiling right after your senior prom before you got to graduate with all of your friends is making them feel super supported. Whatever, we still like seeing who is clearly doing the botox and who had hair way back when.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

2. Truth bomb

Turns out there is a right way to load the dishwasher, Steve.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

3. Stimulus check 

Nothing to see here, nothing to see.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

4. Graphs

We’re okay without the anarchy but the zombies would have at least given us some sports.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

5. Make your decision now

You shouldn’t be sick of any of the local places.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

6. Natural beauty 

The mascara down to your cheeks look is the new smoky-eye.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

7. Part of your world 

Even Michael Scott knows the rules.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

8. Yesterday, all my troubles seemed so far away

The good old days.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

9. Princess Bride

Another great movie in case you haven’t finished Netflix yet.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

10. Sweet Forrest 

Life is like a box of chocolates and a dangerous one at that, especially if you share that with someone who is right next to you.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

11. The walls are closing in 

It’s about to be Thunderdome in here.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

12. What day is it? 

Best part, neither one of them have on pants. #spiritanimal

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

13. Prime time 

You’d better chlorox her too!

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

14. Romeo & Juliet would have been fine

Well, up until they weren’t.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

15. Snow White knows

Grumpy is spot on these days.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

16. Must be nice

There is no try. Only do or do not.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

17. Flashback

We’ll never drink a corona the same again

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

18. Those coupons!

It’s all a marketing ploy to get more customers in the TP deficit.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

19. Casual Friday

Might protect your face but it’s so hard to type with those tiny little t-rex arms!

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

20. Nature is healing 

This one quacked us up. You’re welcome.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

21. Desperate times

It’s like being in a carwash, for dishes.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

22. Groundhog Day

Even the super heroes are restless.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

23. Commute

Really Homer, we know you aren’t putting pants on to go downstairs.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

24. Jacked!

And feed myself pancakes in bed.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

25. Live footage

She’s gonna need a whole lotta time at the spa.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

26. What a relief

As long as they don’t sneeze, you’re good.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

27. My precious

That rocks. (See what we did there?)

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

28. Double meaning

Not like you were going to get together anyhow…

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

29. Scrub-a-dub

This hand sanitizer is so moisturizing, said no one ever.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

30. Largest piece of the pie

Did I always touch it this much?

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

31. Even the celebrities are alone 

Hopefully he’ll use this time to write something amazing for us.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

32. Never let go Jack

It’s your time to shine and provide comfort.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

33. I only had one drink 

Wonder what skills she’ll find out she has after that beverage?

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

34. Cruise ship 

Samesies. Except not at all.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

35. Zoom progression

We call this developing to our surroundings. Also, breaking.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

36. Sweet ride 

Making teachers everywhere proud of your newfound independence brought to you by day-drinking during homeschool.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

37. Can’t touch this

We know someone will eventually cave for that.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

38. Even the emojis are sick 

But do the animals have on masks too?

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

39. Suntan lines

Cruise this time of year: . Mask lines: priceless

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

40. Thieves oil please

Sell it all to me!

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

41. Bring your own lighter

It’s much easier to judge people from a perch.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

42. Sneeze? 

Is that you, Rona?

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

43. Pass the tacos

It’s hard to be in quarantine.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

44. Smocked and bows

No, we don’t know where you can buy this.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

45. The forbidden flower

Its magic is dying.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

46. Sums it up

Everything is fine!

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

47. Slap your face

Too bad you can’t see your mom to ask her.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

48. YouTubers

Time to find a new goal, kids.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

49. But tickets were so cheap

Not worth the risk buddy.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

50. YESSSS

Well, at least you don’t have to search COVID-19 memes, because we have the best ones right here. Stay safe!

MIGHTY SURVIVAL

These are the 6 best subscription boxes to make quarantine better

Subscribing to at at-home delivery box is a great way to bring fun activities straight to your home. No matter your age or interest, there is a theme boxed that can suit your needs. (Shout out to the delivery folks still bringing packages!) And while, months ago, this might have just been a fun thing to get in the mail, today, it’s an excitable event. Activities, treats or fun things to do, delivered straight to your door.

Take advantage of this growing trend and bring fun to your doorstep with these subscription boxes.


5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

1. Try the World

Foods from around the globe, delivered to your door. Sounds like a great concept, right?! This monthly box comes in two versions: snacks, where you’ll receive strictly pre-packaged snackables for /mo; or countries, including a combo of drinks, gourmet foods and cooking ingredients, for /mo.


Order yours
5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

2. Fab Fit Fun

Ladies, if you have any association online, chances are you’ve been flooded with ads for this self care and wellness box. Arriving quarterly, each box comes with a degree of personalized choices in categories like work out clothes, beauty, relaxation items, travel and more. Boxes are /pop.


Sign up.
5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

3. Dollar Shave Club

Like its name suggests, Dollar Shave Club offers razors and shaving gear, delivered to your doorstep, as well as other hygiene products like bar soap, shaving cream and body wash. The brand is primarily marketed toward men, though the razors are universal. Costs start at /mo plus shipping, and vary based on personalized boxes.

Billie is essentially the female-geared counterpart. Billie starter razor kits start at (free shipping); customers can add additional products to their order, like dry shampoo or makeup wipes.

Meanwhile, Gillette loyalists can order directly through the brand for /mo. Shipping and every fourth order are free.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

4. Atlas Coffee Club

Coffee drinkers unite. Take a tour of the best flavors from around the world, all from the comfort of your favorite mug. Atlas Coffee Club brings the beans to you, along with a history of where they’re from. It’s where geography meets great taste.

Explore.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

5. Once Upon a Book Club

Bring the books — and the discussion — to your home with Once Upon a Book Club. Adult and YA books are mailed monthly and can be delved into via an online community. Talk about your favorite sections with other readers as you go. But that’s not the best part — OUABC sends wrapped gifts that coincide with the story. Unwrap as you read for an added boost of fun!

Check it out

.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

6. Battl Box

What military family isn’t complete with a growing collection of tactical gear? Choose from four levels of monthly survival supplies, ranging from .99 to 9.00 plus shipping. Past boxes have included camping gear, hiking supplies, and EDC (every day carry) items.

Stock up here.

What subscription box will you try first?

MIGHTY SURVIVAL

Self-care at home has never been more important

One area of regular life you might be missing is the ability to leave your home for self care. Going for a pedicure, hitting the gym, the PX for a hair spruce — all of these outings we once took for granted. Now, we’re left to deal with our self care at home.

That doesn’t mean it’s impossible, however, just that it’ll take a little more creativity!


Start by assessing your needs. What needs to be done that would make you the most thankful? Toes painted? A quick hair refresh? We’ve all seen the warnings about hitting your locks with box dye, but many hairdressers are selling alternatives, like temporary wash-in color that can help tide you over. As for painted nails, that’s a quick fix at home.

But you don’t have to stop there. Make a day of it! Get out all the lotions and the files and take your time. Play relaxing music and have some fun. The same goes for hair. Spend your time and enjoy this self care, even if it’s in a slightly different setting. Throw your cares to the wind and imagine yourself in an ideal setting.

Ask your kids and your spouse if they want in on the fun too.

Self care as an activity

Once you determine your biggest needs (and wants), you can get started planning.

Ask a loved one for a massage, or order a foot bath online. It may not get here quickly, but it’s something new to look forward to.

If working out is more your style, go on a hike. Make a gym in the yard or garage with things you have on hand. Luckily Pinterest is available to help out in our time of need, with any form of self care.

Why self care?

Taking time to relax might sound silly when we are all spending so much time at home. But it’s not exactly chill. There’s much uncertainty, causing us all to stress. Meanwhile, we’re stacked with new responsibilities … and missing out on our normal methods of self reward.

Don’t overlook this fact. It’s simply an excuse to find ways to get in your creative relaxing time at home.

Find ways to add in some self care to your quarantined schedule. Use creative methods to take better care of yourself, and your mental health.

MIGHTY MILSPOUSE

6 art projects to tackle with kids

Parents, it’s time to get those creative juices flowing! Take advantage of extra time with the kiddos and see what everyone can do with their best art skills at work. Look to local inspiration (and plenty of grace for the non-artists among us), for a fun way to spend some of your quarantine.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

Stained “glass” decor

This trend has probably blown up your newsfeed. Get some tape, some paint or chalk, and map out a pattern with triangles and squares. It’s perfect for anyone living on post who wants to share some beauty for all to see. Best of all, it’s colorful!

Inspiration art

Straight out of elementary art class, this project can be adjusted for any age. Provide kids with a subject (vehicle, animal, design), along with a few art supplies. Let each kid create their own masterpiece, then have a discussion about what they liked most. Kids can even comment on which aspects of their siblings’ pieces they like the best. Take it a step further and set up a gallery.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

Messy painting

Let your inner control freak go and let them make a mess! Set up sheets, canvases, paper, or t-shirts in the lawn and let them get wild. Our favorite methods include: paint-filled balloons or squirt guns, and sponges launched from far away.

String art

Grab a piece of wood and strategically place nails. (Older kids can even do the nails themselves.) Next, provide some colored string and let them weave away. Do this in the backyard, or (if open) head to some beautiful open spaces on base for a change of scenery.

5 things to do in quarantine to boost your IQ

Slime drawings

These days slime is a big deal. Grab a slab of it and have kids make their own marker drawing, yes, right on the slime. Once done they can stretch and mold the artwork to change its entire look. Mix it all back together and start all over again!

Melted crayons

This is a fun project that allows kids to create and transform their art project. Help them grind up old crayons and encourage them to spread it out and make a design on some waxed paper. Once finished, add another layer and iron the whole thing for a lasting project you can hang on the fridge or in a window for colorful light.

What are your favorite art projects to do with kids during quarantine?

MIGHTY SURVIVAL

CDC director: We can control virus in 4 to 8 weeks if everyone in the US wears a mask

Now is the time for everyone to wear masks, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Dr. Robert Redfield and his colleagues wrote in an editorial published Tuesday in the journal JAMA.

While the organization has been slow to warm up to broad mask-wearing recommendations — first advising, but not requiring, healthy members of the general public on April 3 to cover their faces when out and about — Redfield and his colleagues now say mask wearing should be universal because “there is ample evidence” asymptomatic people may be what’s keeping the pandemic alive.


“The data is clearly there that masking works,” Redfield told Dr. Howard Bauchner, JAMA’s editor in chief, during an interview Tuesday that corresponded with the editorial’s release. “If we can get everybody to wear a mask right now, I really do think in the next four, six, eight weeks … we can get this epidemic under control.”

One model projects universal masking could save 45,000 lives by November 

In the paper, Redfield, with his CDC colleagues Dr. John Brooks and Dr. Jay Butler, pointed to research demonstrating the effectiveness of masks.

One study of the largest healthcare system in Massachusetts showed how universal masking of healthcare workers and patients reversed the infection’s trajectory among its employees.

They also pointed to the Missouri hairstylists who were infected with COVID-19 but did not infect any of their 140 clients, presumably because of the salon’s universal masking policy.

A CDC report also released Tuesday detailed this case, concluding “consistent and correct use of face coverings, when appropriate, is an important tool for minimizing spread of SARS-CoV-2 from presymptomatic, asymptomatic, and symptomatic persons.”

Meanwhile, a modeling program from the University of Washington projected universal masking could save 45,000 lives by November.

“Mask mandates delay the need for re-imposing closures of businesses and have huge economic benefits,” Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation Director Dr. Christopher Murray said in a statement, MarketWatch reported. “Moreover, those who refuse masks are putting their lives, their families, their friends, and their communities at risk.”

Not wearing a mask is like opting to undergo surgery by a team without face coverings

The JAMA paper also highlighted the two key reasons masking works: It protects both the wearer and the people they come in contact with.

While early recommendations focused on masking’s benefit to those around you, Redfield and colleagues emphasized the benefit to the wearer as well.

They likened not wearing a mask with choosing to be operated on by a team without any face coverings — an “absurd” option because it’s known the clinicians’ conversations and breathing would generate microbes that could infect an open wound.

“Face coverings do the same in blocking transmission of SARS-CoV-2,” the doctors wrote.

Proper social distancing and handwashing are equally important measures, though, when fighting the virus, Redfield told Bauchner.

People are coming around to mask wearing, but there’s still resistance 

More people are coming around to mask wearing, with a separate CDC report, also out Tuesday, showing the rates of mask wearing in public increased from 61.9% to 76.4% between April and May.

Redfield told Bauchner he was “heartened” to see President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence setting that example.

But there’s still resistance, and the issue remains politicized — something Redfield and his coauthors hope their editorial will cut through.

“At this critical juncture when COVID-19 is resurging, broad adoption of cloth face coverings is a civic duty, a small sacrifice reliant on a highly effective low-tech solution that can help turn the tide favorably in national and global efforts against COVID-19,” they wrote.

This article originally appeared on Business Insider. Follow @BusinessInsider on Twitter.

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