(Lionsgate)

Comfort is one of the last things in mind when the U.S. Navy designs a submarine. There's little room to walk around, restrooms and showers are kept as cramped as possible to make room for ordnance and mechanics, and the perpetual lack of sunlight and fresh air will make you forget what time of the day it is.

Add all that up and you'll quickly realize being deployed for months on end on a submarine is enough to make most people go crazy with cabin fever — but the submariners of the United States Navy are legitimate badasses, so they make due.


We Are The Mighty is proud to support the release of 'Hunter Killer,' a submarine thriller starring Gerard Butler and Gary Oldman that hits theaters on October 26, 2018.


There's a certain flow that gets developed while underway. The lack of sunlight actually makes it easier on the human body to adapt to a new circadian rhythm, which makes splitting shifts a little easier. There's a running joke among submariners that the only reliable way to tell the time it is by what the mess hall is cooking. If it's waffles, it's probably morning. If it's leftovers, it's definitely midnight.

The crew takes turns cycling through three eight-hour shifts: eight hours of sleep, eight hours of duty, and eight hours of free-time. Prior to 2014, submariners endured an 18-hour day that was split into three sections of six hours of each, but it was decided by the powers that be that shifting people off of a 24-hour cycle was a terrible idea for everyone's sanity.

An extra two hours of duty is nothing if it means not losing your freakin' mind.

(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jeffrey M. Richardson)

When it comes to sleeping, it's not an exaggeration to say that the racks resemble coffins. Stacked two high and barely arms-width apart, the only way you can get any kind of privacy is via a tiny, little curtain. If you can get used to that, great. If you can't, well, sucks to be you...

The space for your personal belongings amounts to all of a single drawer under your rack and a cabinet above your pillow. To everyone else in the military, that's about a duffel bag's load of stuff to last you an average of 90 days. What this means is that you'll usually take changes of uniforms, the occasional personal memento, and that's about it.

This 15 sq. foot rack can be all yours for the low, low price of a one enlistment contract!

(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jeffrey M. Richardson)

After the submariner finishes their assigned watch, their time is their own until they head back to bed. They'll often get called back for work or get stuck on some mind-numbing detail — but sometimes, it's a nice break in the monotony.

Since you can't really chill out in the living quarters if you're lower rank, the preferred way to relax is to crowd into the mess hall and watch TV. New submarines are being fitted with internet access to give submariners something to do — but don't expect speeds greater than old-school dial-up all the way down there. There are gyms on board, but you'll have to stretch your definition of "gym" to mean two machines that are shared among the crew.

Slackers, rejoice! You probably won't be PTing that much while you're underway. Just remember that PT standards still apply when you're back on land, so there's that...

(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Steven Khor)

Life isn't easy on a submarine. It's not for everyone. But if you can endure the extensive training to earn your Submarine Warfare Insignia and knock out a deployment-at-sea in a cramped tin can, you've earned the right to be objectively cooler than (nearly) everyone else in the Navy.

(Lionsgate)

We Are The Mighty is proud to support the release of 'Hunter Killer,' a submarine thriller starring Gerard Butler and Gary Oldman that hits theaters on October 26, 2018.