MILITARY CULTURE

This is what your wardrobe on mandatory fun days says about you

For better or worse, you're going to find out basically everything about your brothers- and sisters-in-arms. The longer you serve with them — the more field ops, the more deployments, and the more random BS — the more you're going to learn all the tiny, little details about your fellow troops.

But if you want a crash course on the personal life of any other troop, look no further than how they dress whenever they're given the option to show up in civvies instead of the uniform. Sometimes it's at the recall formation at 0200 on Saturday morning and everyone's just rolled out of bed. But when it's a "mandatory fun" day with the unit, troops tend to get a bit... uh... creative with their wardrobe selection.

Here's what your choice of mando-fun outfit says about you.


Average civilian clothes 

Nothing really stands out about this troop. They're probably the type to stay in, honorably discharge, get into a nice school under the GI Bill, and become a productive member of society. There's nothing really bad you could say about them but, man, these guys are boring as hell.

They may fit in with world when they're on leave, but in the unit, they're the odd one out — because they're not what society considers odd like the rest of us.

There's a 50% chance that all of these guys' military stories are about other (more interesting) people.

Look at them. Being all successful and sh*t.

(U.S. Coast Guard photograph by Aux. Barry Novakoff.)

Basically the uniform, but with blue jeans and without the top

If this troop has been in any longer than one pay period beyond basic training and still dresses like they're barely satisfying the minimum requirement to be "out of uniform," then they're lazy as f*ck. The longer this troop has been in, the less of an excuse they have — they get a clothing allowance that specifically includes extra cash for civilian clothes.

It's literally the one time the military gives you money and says, "go buy yourself something nice" and this troop wasted it on booze, video games, or strippers.

These bums have a 98% chance of asking you to spot them until payday, saying they can "totally" get you back (but never will).

They're probably 98% more likely to also being too lazy to even change from the work day before...

(U.S. Army photo)

Over-the-top, ridiculous clothing

This troop has been eagerly awaiting the moment they're told they can wear civilian clothes. This dude is the platoon's joker while in uniform, so don't expect that to change when they're given the freedom to wear whatever.

You can never really predict what they're going to show up in. Maybe they'll wear a Halloween costume in April. Maybe they'll show up in a fully-traditional kilt. Maybe they'll just wear that mankini thing from Borat.

These bros also have a 69% chance of repeating a joke if you don't laugh at it, insisting that you must have missed it the first time two times.

If they do wear a kilt in formation, they have a 100% chance of asking you, "do you know the difference between a kilt and a skirt?" before mooning you.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by SSgt. Marc R. Ayalin)

Overtly moto clothes

It's not entirely uncommon for troops to start up clothing lines when they leave the service. Hell, we even got into the veteran-humor t-shirt game to help pay the bills. Warning: shameless self-promotion here.

But there's just something odd about troops who wear overly-Hooah, I'm-a-Spartan-sheepdog-who-became-the-Grim-Reaper-for-your-freedoms shirt when everyone in the unit knows you're a POG who just got to the unit. We're not knocking the shirt (because that's something we should probably start selling sooner or later...) but, you're not fooling anyone.

These boots are 1% likely to actually be a grunt.

Same style you had before you enlisted

That moment you enlist is probably the last time you really give a damn about clothing styles. So, your closet is (probably) still full of clothes that you might get around to wearing some day. We get it. But it gets kinda sad the longer you've been in the military.

Dressing like a background actor in Avril Lavigne's "Sk8r Boi" music video may have been cool back in the day, but when you see a salty, old first sergeant try to rock that look it's... just depressing.

These dudes have a 75% chance of reaching 10 years, saying, "what's another 10 anyways?" to themselves, and immediately regretting that decision.

This was your first sergeant ten years ago... and ten days ago...

Business casual with a "high and tight"

When the commander puts out the memo saying troops can wear whatever they want as long as they're in formation, these guys kind of break down. Freedom of choice is a foreign concept to them.

What they chose to wear is, essentially, another kind of uniform: a muted-color polo tucked into a pair of ironed khakis, a brown belt, and loafers — and maybe a branch hat that they picked up at the PX because they'd have an anxiety attack if the open wind touched their bare head.

This guy has a 99.99% chance of also trying enforce some sort of clothing standard when there isn't even a need for it.

Civilian clothes don't have a standard, but if they did...

(U.S. Air Force photo by Capt. John Ross)