MIGHTY CULTURE

Trump asked the actual war fighters about Afghanistan

Trump had one question when it came to the War in Afghanistan, according to journalist Bob Woodward's 2018 book Fear: Trump in the White House: "What the f*ck are we doing there?" And he didn't just want to know what the generals thought, so he asked the lower ranks.


When Trump took office in 2017 and was presented with options on securing high-value targets and changing the course of the war from the Obama-era policies, Trump changed the conversation, telling then-Secretary of Defense James Mattis that he wanted to talk to some "enlisted guys" about the war.

Mattis rolled his eyes.

The President in the Oval Office with many of his original staff from 2017.

"I want to get some real fighters over here who are not officers," the President told his advisors, including Mattis, former Gen. H.R. McMaster, White House Chief of Staff Steve Bannon, and others. He wanted their "on the ground views" of the war. While the former officers in the room scoffed at the idea of enlisted troops informing the Commander-in-Chief on the then-16-year-long war in Afghanistan, Trump's controversial Chief of Staff thought of it more idealistically, relating the idea to President Lincoln talking to Union troops during the Civil War.

On July 18, 2017, almost six months to the day after taking office, the President sat down with three soldiers and an airman who spent significant time in Afghanistan and had lunch in the Roosevelt Room of the White House.

From left, Vice President Mike Pence, President Donald J. Trump, and National Security Advisor Army Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster talk with service members during a lunch in the Roosevelt Room at the White House, July 18, 2017.

(White House photo by Shealah Craighead)

Trump was joined in the lunch by McMaster, Vice President Mike Pence, Army First Sgt. Michael Wagner, Army Master Sgt. Zachary Bowman, Army Master Sgt. Henry Adames, and Air Force Major Eric Birch. As the lunch began, the President told reporters they were there "to find out why we've been there for 17 years, how it's going and what we should do in terms of additional ideas."

"We have plenty of ideas from a lot of people," Trump said, "but I want to hear it from people on the ground."

The President asked them what they thought the U.S. was doing in Afghanistan, where they thought it was going, and what they should do for additional ideas. Afterward, Woodward writes, Trump told Bannon the ground pounders' views were unanimous – "we've got to figure out how to get the f*ck out of there... Totally corrupt... the people are not worth fighting for... NATO does nothing, they're a hindrance... it's all bullsh*t."

So when it came time to discuss new policy at the next National Security Council meeting, Trump interrupted McMaster's briefing, saying his best information came from the "line soldiers" he met that day.

"I don't care about you guys," Trump told Mattis, McMaster, and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs Gen. Joseph Dunford and the rest of the NSC in a 25-minute dressing down on everyone who informed Afghanistan war policy. "It's a disaster ... the soldiers on the ground could run things much better than you."