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4 unusual tasks Corpsmen do that their recruiters left out

When men and women around the globe enlist in the Navy with a contract to become Corpsmen, it's a pretty good feeling. Good recruiters can make chipping paint and shining brass sound bad ass ("think of the adventure!"), but let's be …
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navy corpsmen
U.S. Navy Corpsman 2nd Class Jefferson Chua with Marine Wing Support Squadron (MWSS) 171 demonstrates H-bandage application at Japan Ground Self-Defense Force Camp Nihonbara, Japan, March 20, 2021. Marines and sailors with MWSS-171 are participating in a two-week field exercise to hone their skills in setting up a forward operating base, a forward arming and refueling point, and conducting mounted live fire events. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Jackson Ricker) U.S. Navy Corpsman 2nd Class Jefferson Chua with Marine Wing Support Squadron (MWSS) 171 demonstrates H-bandage application at Japan Ground Self-Defense Force Camp Nihonbara, Japan, March 20, 2021. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Jackson Ricker)

When men and women around the globe enlist in the Navy with a contract to become Corpsmen, it’s a pretty good feeling. Good recruiters can make chipping paint and shining brass sound bad ass (“think of the adventure!”), but let’s be honest: they have quotas to fill each month, people.

For the most part, they’ll tell you the truth about what will be asked of you while you serve, but there are some details that don’t make it into the recruiting pamphlets. As a “Doc,” you’ll get to work alongside and assist Doctors, nurses, and IDCs (Independent Duty Corpsmen), gaining knowledge from them to support your career moving forward; but that’s not all you’ll have to do.

Check out these unusual tasks Corpsmen never saw coming.

1. The silver bullet

Probably the most popular slang “medical” term in any branch. Typically, temperature is taken orally, but if someone falls out of a hike or PT because of heat exhaustion…standby for the bullet.

Feared by all

2. Having sick call in your barracks room

When Corpsmen get stationed with the Marines (also known as the Greenside), you typically live with them in the barracks. This also means a lot of your medical gear is right there in the room with you.

If your Marines love you, which most of them do, they tend to show up at your barracks door at 0400 for an I.V. treatment to “rehydrate” them an hour before mandatory PT.

The B.A.S. or Battalion Aid Station isn’t open on nights, weekends, or early mornings — just normal office hours.

3. Bore punching

Working sick call as a boot Corpsman, you’ll get exposed to some interesting on-job-training. Bore punching is a euphemism for swabbing male genitals for an STD with a 6 inch Q-tip. Yup! Right down the pee hole.

If your Chief or Lieutenant are “too busy” and they say you need to do it for a patient — you need to do it.

Welcome to the Navy, baby!

4. Finger waving

No, this isn’t the newest break dancing move or a classy way to hit on someone at the bar — it’s the alternative name for a rectal exam. It is shocking what the Navy allows Corpsmen to do after only 12-16 weeks of training.

Don’t forget the lube!