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The new 'Snowflake' recruitment ads for the British Army are actually ingenious

(Photo L: by Hayden Allega / R: British Army)

The British Army has had many iconic recruitment ad campaigns over the years. From Lord Kitchener's, "Your Country Needs You" that became the basis of nearly every other recruitment poster to WWI's famous, "Your chums are fighting. Why aren't you?"

Today, the Armed Forces of the United Kingdom are at some of the lowest numbers in centuries. Now, they're trying out a new recruitment strategy:


(British Army)

On the surface, it might seem belittling to potential recruits and, to be fair, that's how most people are interpreting it. But if you take a step back and read the full poster and evaluated the entire campaign as a whole, it's actually brilliant.

The poster above is a part of the British Army's "This is Belonging" campaign, which also includes TV ads that showcases young people who feel undervalued in their jobs. Other posters also call for "me me me millennials" and their self-belief, "binge gamers" and their drive, "selfie addicts" and their confidence, "class clowns" and their spirit, and "phone zombies" and their focus.

It's a call to action to a younger generation that may not believe they're right for anywhere. The TV ad for the binge gamer shows the person being scolded for playing too many games, but he keeps pushing himself after every "Game Over." Next, the commercial cuts to this same gamer as a soldier, and he's pushing himself further and further. At its core, that's what this campaign is really about.

British Army recruiters have long labelled service as a means to better one's self. Sure, it's patronizing to call a potential recruit a "me me me millennial," but it's also breaking conventional by attributing a positive quality, "self-belief," to that same person — a quality desired by the military.

The reception has been, let's say, highly polarizing. One side is complaining that it's demeaning and desperate while the other is complaining that the British Army doesn't need snowflakes. The bigger picture is that it's a marketing strategy geared towards getting the attention of disenfranchised youth who just happen to be the perfect age for military service.

Since it was just released, only time will tell whether it's effective in bringing in young Brits. But it has certainly gone viral and everyone is talking about it, which was definitely the objective.

I don't want to be the guy to point it out, but... the oldest millennials are now 37 and the youngest are 25. Let's not get them confused with Gen-Z, the 17 to 24 year olds that are more commonly associated with these stereotypes. Just sayin'...

(British Army)