Veterans

The veteran's guide to not being 'That Guy' on Veterans Day

Veterans Day is quickly approaching and, honestly, it's one of the greatest times to be a veteran. You can drive around town with your military or VA ID and treat yourself to all the free pancakes, haircuts, and oil changes you could possibly desire!

It's amazing that so many companies are willing to take a financial dip for the sake of showing support to our nation's veterans — though they probably recoup their losses by bringing in family members who otherwise wouldn't have dined there that day, but hey, who are we to complain?

Potential PR gains aside, it's fantastic to see veterans come out in droves and proudly let the world know that they served their community and their country — but despite all the patriotic goodness going around, there's always that one guy who has to ruin it for the rest of us.

Veterans of America, here are a few helpful hints to keep in the back of your mind when you're out there getting some free buffalo wings this holiday.


Remember the spirit of the holiday: civilians honoring veterans

The civilian-military divide is very real. With each passing year, the number of civilians with troops or veterans in their circle of friends or family decreases. Veterans Day gives these civilians, who know to honor veterans, a name and a face towards which to express that gratitude.

So, when a civilian comes forth and wants to thank you for your service, be polite, be courteous, and be professional. If you leave a fantastic impression on a civilian, they'll go forward assuming that everyone in the military is as pleasant as you were. If you're a dick to them, well, that impression will stick, too.

WWI Never Forget

Think of yourself as an ambassador to the veteran community. You're going out there to face a population that, in many cases, has only heard of us in pop culture or on the news. Take the time and share some of your lighter stories about your time in the service. Who knows? Maybe you'll convince someone that military life isn't all that bad — you just did half of the recruiter's job for them.

Veterans Day is a day to celebrate everything that veterans have given this country. Enjoy it with a burger that has an American Flag toothpick in it — because America.

(Photo by Jorge Franganillo)

Don't exaggerate your time in service

We all served as a cog in this grand machine we call the military. There's no shame in having played any role. If you were a flight-line mechanic in the Air Force, own it — and let people know that you worked your ass off to be the best damn flight-line mechanic around.

There's no need to pretend you were some badass when, clearly, you weren't, The military discount applies equally to the Army private who fixed NVGs and the Green Beret who went on a classified amount of missions for Uncle Sam, so keep your cool.

This rule of thumb is important for two reasons. One, exaggerating your role belittles the other troops and veterans who honorably served their country in those seemingly small, but essential roles. Two, it takes away from the level of badassery that actual special operations maintained.

Just be you. If you raised your right hand to support and defend this country, you've earned respect.

Just because your career consisted of just doing pointless details for Uncle Sam doesn't mean you didn't serve. That just means you were junior enlisted.

(Photo via US Army WTF Moments)

Don't go too far with inter-branch rivalries

While we're in the service, we can be a bit harsh on our brothers- and sisters-in-arms about what they do and which branch they serve under. It's in good fun between us and, usually, there's no bad blood.

But not every veteran will take your "Marines are crayon-eating idiots" joke as lightly as you'd hope. As bitter as the rivalry between the 101st and 82nd Airborne is, it's fine to put aside such differences over a beer. And shouting "POG!" at every support guy you see just doesn't make sense when you two are the only ones who'll understand what a "POG" is, anyway.

Enjoy the day with other veterans, especially if they served in a different era than you. You just might learn a thing or two from them.

It may seem awkward at first, but it really does mean a lot to tell another veteran that you're thankful for their service.

(U.S. Army photo by Spc. Michael Adams)

Don't go patrolling for stolen valor turds.

We get it. There are douchebags out there that try to pretend to be veterans on Veterans Day just to get a free burger and some undeserved attention. F*ck 'em. It's totally understandable to chew one of these assclowns out for reaping benefits for which they never sacrificed.

With that being said, don't actively go out searching for these losers because, nine times out of ten, they're actually veterans.

Use your best judgement when it comes to spotting other veterans. If you see an older guy that's sitting quietly, eating with his family while wearing a Vietnam War cap, do not go around screaming at them, accusing them of stealing valor. They're more than likely a veteran. If you see a twenty-something year-old prick wearing a modern uniform all jacked up? Well, feel free to press them about their service a little. Remember, though, that some veterans suffer from traumatic brain injuries, so the answers to very specific questions may be a bit fuzzy.

I honestly don't get why these dumbasses waste so much money on impersonating veterans just to save 10% on a $15 meal — but hey, that's just me.

Don't argue with retail clerks at places that don't offer veteran discounts

Most places will give a veterans discount on Veterans Day — and that's amazing. This doesn't mean, however, that every place is required to offer one. Please — I'm begging from the bottom of my heart, here — do not get into a shouting match at some poor, minimum-wage-earning civilian who had absolutely no say on corporate policy.

Unless you're talking to a real decision-maker, all you're doing is making that retail worker think that all veterans are pricks. They'll grow to resent veterans and it'll put yet another wedge in the civilian-military divide. Just pay full price like everyone else that day, or politely say "thanks anyways" and move on to a competitor that does offer one.

Or you could call ahead or look up online where all the discounts and freebies are. It'll be all over the internet this time of year.

(US. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Nicole Sikorski)