These awesome dogs are full-on MARSOC operators

The Raiders of Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command are some of the world’s greatest warrior-athletes, specializing in taking the fight to America’s enemies across the globe. But not all fighting members of MARSOC are the human Raiders. Some are specially trained canines who deploy across the world and support Marines wherever they’re called upon.

Here they are, in 14 photos:

1. MARSOC dogs are highly-trained animals who work with their multipurpose canine handlers to execute missions around the world.

A Multi-Purpose Canine (MPC) handler with U.S. Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command participates in search and tracking drills with his canine aboard Camp Pendleton, Calif., Feb. 9, 2016. MARSOC specializes in direct action, special reconnaissance and foreign internal defense and has also been directed to conduct counter-terrorism, and information operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Maricela M. Bryant, MCIWEST-MCB CamPen Combat Camera/Released)

(Photo: U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Maricela M. Bryant)

2. The dogs train to accompany their handlers on a variety of missions and can enter the battlefield via Zodiac boat.

A Multi-Purpose Canine with U.S. Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command (MARSOC), prepares for Zodiac boat training inserts on Camp Pendleton, Calif., Feb. 9, 2016. MARSOC specializes in direct action, special reconnaissance and foreign internal defense and has also been directed to conduct counter-terrorism, and information operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Maricela M. Bryant, MCIWEST-MCB CamPen Combat Camera/Released)

(Photo: U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Maricela M. Bryant)

3. When necessary, they can also swim stealthily to shore.

A Multi-Purpose Canine (MPC) handler with U.S. Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command participates in a 500 meter surface swim with his canine aboard Camp Pendleton, Calif., Feb. 9, 2016. MARSOC specializes in direct action, special reconnaissance and foreign internal defense, and has also been directed to conduct counter-terrorism and information operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Maricela M. Bryant, MCIWEST-MCB CamPen Combat Camera/Released)

(Photo: U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Maricela M. Bryant)

4. The canines and handlers will then make their way through the surf and toward their objective.

A Multi-Purpose Canine (MPC) handler with U.S. Army Special Forces, conducts Zodiac boat training inserts with his canine, Blondie, on Camp Pendleton, Calif., Feb. 11, 2016. MPC handlers with the command are preparing themselves and their canines for new areas of operation in which they will be working. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Tabitha A. Markovich, MCIWEST-MCB CamPen Combat Camera/Released)

(Photo: U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Tabitha A. Markovich)

5. When the target is far from shore, the dogs and their handlers can even insert by parachute.

A Marine Raider with U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command, parachutes with a Multi-Purpose Canine aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., Sept. 10, 2015. As MARSOC continues to demonstrate their versatile capabilities, MPC handlers with the command are preparing their canines to maneuver in new areas of operation.

(Photo: U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Scott Achtemeier)

6. Once they reach the objective, the dogs are capable of completing many missions. Some engage in direct action, helping MARSOC Raiders clear buildings and hunt down bad guys.

A Multi-Purpose Canine (MPC) handler with U.S. Army Special Forces, gives commands to his canine, Blondie, during Zodiac boat training inserts on Camp Pendleton, Calif., Feb. 11, 2016. MPC handlers with the command are preparing themselves and their canines for new areas of operation in which they will be working. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Tabitha A. Markovich, MCIWEST-MCB CamPen Combat Camera/Released)

(Photo: U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Tabitha A. Markovich)

7. The dogs have to move tactically with the other operators and perform their tasks as a member of the team.

(Photo: U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Tabitha A. Markovich)

8. One of their specialties is seeking out enemies who’ve tried to hide or escape.

A multipurpose canine with the United States Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command (MARSOC) detects an opposition force role player during an open area detection exercise on Camp Pendleton, Calif., on Feb. 2, 2016. MARSOC specializes in direct action, special reconnaissance and foreign internal defense and has also been directed to conduct counter-terrorism, and information operations. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Lance Cpl. Roderick Jacquote, MCIWEST-MCB CamPen/Released)

(Photo: U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Roderick Jacquote)

9. To work well together, the dogs and handlers have to train together in all their essential tasks, including range qualifications.

A U.S. Marine multipurpose canine handler, with the United States Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command (MARSOC), aims during a live fire canine training on Camp Pendleton, Calif., Feb. 5, 2016. MARSOC specializes in direct action, special reconnaissance and foreign internal defense and has also been directed to conduct counter-terrorism, and information operations. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Lance Cpl. Roderick Jacquote/Released)

(Photo: U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Roderick Jacquote)

10. They also swim together.

A U.S. Marine Multipurpose Dog Handler, with Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command (MARSOC), participates in swim exercises with his canine on Camp Pendleton, Calif., Feb. 8, 2016. MARSOC specializes in direct action, special reconnaissance and foreign internal defense and has also been directed to conduct counter-terrorism, and information operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Brian Bekkala, MCIWEST-MCB CamPen Combat Camera/Released)

(Photo: U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Brian Bekkala)

11. They dive together.

A U.S. Marine Multipurpose Dog Handler, with Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command (MARSOC), jumps from a platform with his canine during swim exercises on Camp Pendleton, Calif., Feb. 8, 2016. MARSOC specializes in direct action, special reconnaissance and foreign internal defense and has also been directed to conduct counter-terrorism, and information operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Brian Bekkala, MCIWEST-MCB CamPen Combat Camera/Released)

(Cpl. Brian Bekkala)

12. They even complete obstacle courses together. Here, a U.S. Army soldier navigates the course with a Marine Corps canine.

A U.S. Army Soldier participates in an obstacle course with a Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command (MARSOC) canine during a Multi-Purpose canine subject matter expert exchange conference on Camp Pendleton, Calif., Feb. 4, 2016. MARSOC specializes in direct action, special reconnaissance and foreign internal defense and has also been directed to conduct counter-terrorism and information operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Tyler S. Dietrich, MCIWEST-MCB CamPen Combat Camera/Released)

(Photo: U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Tyler S. Dietrich)

13. The obstacle courses at Camp Pendleton, California, give the dogs and handlers plenty of realistic barriers to navigate.

A U.S. Marine Corps Canine with Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command (MARSOC) navigates through a simulated window obstacle during a MARSOC Multi-Purpose canine subject matter expert exchange conference on Camp Pendleton, Calif., Feb. 4, 2016. MARSOC specializes in direct action, special reconnaissance and foreign internal defense and has also been directed to conduct counter-terrorism and information operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Tyler S. Dietrich, MCIWEST-MCB CamPen Combat Camera/Released)

(Photo: U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Tyler S. Dietrich)

14. We’re not sure whether the dogs take the training quite as seriously as their handlers, but they’re pretty darn impressive nonetheless.

A U.S. Marine Multipurpose canine with Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command (MARSOC), exits the pool while conducting swimming exercises on Camp Pendleton, Calif., Feb. 8, 2016. MARSOC specializes in direct action, special reconnaissance and foreign internal defense and has also been directed to conduct counter-terrorism, and information operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Brian Bekkala, MCIWEST-MCB CamPen Combat Camera/Released)

(Photo: U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Brian Bekkala)

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