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7 undeniable signs you're a super POG

Look, not everyone can be a hardcore, red-blooded meat eater. Someone has to man the phones at the big bases and that's just the job for you. You're a vital part of the American war machine, and you should be proud of yourself.


But there are some things you're doing that open you up to a bit of ridicule. Sure, not everyone is going to be a combat arms bubba, embracing the suck and praying they'll get stomped on by the Army just one more time today. But some of us POGs are taking our personal comfort a little too far and failing to to properly embrace the Army lifestyle.

Here are seven signs that you're not only a POG but a super POG:

7. You're more likely to bring your "luggage" than a duffel bag and rucksack

(via NavyMemes.com)

There are some semi-famous photos of this phenomenon that show support soldiers laughing in frustration as they try to roll wheeled bags across the crushed gravel and thick mud of Kandahar and other major bases.

This is a uniquely POG problem, as any infantryman — and most support soldiers worth their salt — know that they're going to be on unforgiving terrain and that they'll need their hands free to use their weapon while carrying weight at some point. Both of those factors make rolling bags a ridiculous choice.

6. You actually enjoy collecting command coins

(Photo: WATM)

Seriously, what is it about these cheap pieces of unit "swag" that makes them so coveted. I mean, sure, back when those coins could get you free drinks, it made some sense. But now? It's the military version of crappy tourist trinkets.

Anyone who wants to remember the unit instead of their squad mates was clearly doing the whole "deployment" thing wrong. And challenge coins don't help you remember your squad; selfies while drunk in the barracks or photos of the whole platoon making stupid faces while pointing their weapons in the air do.

5. You don't understand why everyone makes such a big deal about MREs (just go to TGI Fridays if you're tired of them!)

(via Valhalla Wear)

More than once I've heard POGs say that MREs aren't that bad and you can always go to the DFAC or Green Beans or, according to one POG on Kandahar Air Field, down to TGI Friday's when you're tired of MREs. And I'm going to need those people to check their POG privilege.

Look, not every base can get an American restaurant. Not every base has a DFAC. A few bases couldn't even get regular mermite deliveries. Those soldiers, unfortunately, were restricted to MREs and their big brother, UGRs (Unitized Group Rations), both of which have limited, repetitive menus and are not great for one meal, let alone meals for a year.

So please, send care packages.

4. You think of jet engines as those things that interrupt your sleep

Afterburners lit while an F-22 of the 95th Fighter Squadron takes off. (Photo: U.S. Air Force)

I know, it's super annoying when you're settling into a warm bed on one of the airfields and, just as you drift off, an ear-splitting roar announces that a jet is taking off, filling your belly with adrenaline and guaranteeing that you'll be awake another hour.

But please remember that those jets are headed to help troops in contact who won't be getting any sleep until their enemies retreat or are rooted out. A fast, low flyover by a loud jet sometimes gets the job done, and a JDAM strike usually does.

So let the jets fly and invest in a white noise machine. The multiple 120-volt outlets in your room aren't just for show.

3. You've broken in more office chairs than combat boots

Pretty obvious. POGs spend hours per day in office chairs, protecting their boots from any serious work, while infantryman are more likely to be laying out equipment in the motor pool, marching, or conducting field problems, all of which get their boots covered in grease and mud while wearing out the soles and seams.

2. You still handle your rifle like it's a dead fish or a live snake

No, POGs, you don't.

While most troops work with their weapons a few times a year and combat arms soldiers are likely to carry it at least a few times a month on some kind of an exercise, true super POGs MIGHT see their M4 or M16 once a year. And many of them are too lazy to even name it. (I miss you, Rachel.)

Because of this, they still treat their weapon as some sort of foreign object, holding it at arms length like it's a smelly fish that could get them dirty or a live snake that could bite them. Seriously, go cuddle up to the thing and get used to it. It'll only kill the things you point it at, and only if you learn to actually use it.

1. You're offended by the word "POG"

Yes, it's rude for the mean old infantry to call you names, but come on. All military service is important, and it's perfectly honorable to be a POG (seriously, I wrote a column all about that), but the infantry is usually calling you a POG to tease you or to pat themselves on the back.

And why shouldn't they? Yes, #AllServiceMatters, but the burdens of service aren't shared evenly. While the combat arms guys are likely to sleep in the dirt many nights and are almost assured that they'll have to engage in combat at some point, the troops who network satellites will rarely experience a day without air conditioning.

Is it too much to let the grunts lob a cheap insult every once in a while?

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