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This once-classified film was used to train American bomber pilots how to survive enemy flak


B-17 taking flak during bombing run over Germany. (Photo: Army Air Corps Archives)

As the allies moved east after the D-Day invasion, air power was used to soften Germany's defenses and eliminate the Third Reich's ability to make the tools of war. The American Army Air Corps and the British Royal Air Force bombed around the clock, with the Americans covering the daylight hours.

Losses were high. Over 100,000 allied bomber crews were killed over Europe during World War II. And casualties would have been even higher had the pilots not adjusted their tactics along the way. This film was used to train replacement crews on how to survive enemy air defenses. Because of the level of detail -- specific tactics and techniques -- it was highly classified during the war.

So imagine you're a newly B-17 winged pilot on your way to England for your first combat tour. This is one training session you're going to pay attention to.

Watch this flick: