Articles

This artist shows combat through a fighting man's eyes


Tom Lea's painting "That 2,000-Yard Stare." (Image courtesy of The National World War II Museum)

It's been said that if you look at an infantryman's eyes you can tell how much war he has seen. Stare into the eyes of many of the fighting men portrayed by World War II combat artist Tom Lea and you can tell his subjects have seen Hell – and then some.

Muralist, illustrator, war correspondent, portraitist, landscape artist, novelist, and historian, the multi-talented Lea covered World War II for "Life" magazine, a publication that pioneered photojournalists' coverage of combat yet still showcased his drawings and paintings of warfare. Now, the public has a rare opportunity to view some of Lea's best work at a single impressive exhibit.

"Tom Lea: LIFE and World War II" is showing at The National WWII Museum, New Orleans, through January 1, 2017. Sponsored by The Woldenberg Foundation, the exhibition features nearly 30 original paintings and illustrations on loan from the U.S. Army Center of Military History, as well as from private collections and museums.

There are also interpretative displays, audio-visual presentations of oral histories from World War II veterans who participated in the battles Lea portrayed, and displays of personal items that belonged to Lea such as his drawing table, brushes and an easel.

Even though World War II is frequently remembered as a time when the combat photographer came into his own, Lea's work as an artist was relevant during World War II because it was extremely dynamic and caught the imagination of service members' families and other civilians back home, said Larry Decuers, the exhibit's curator.

"His images provided everyone on the home front with a realistic — if haunting— view of combat unfolding overseas," Decuers said. "Lea's works also represented a unique aspect of wartime journalism because they were so detailed in design."

Thomas Calloway "Tom" Lea III, who died in 2001, said his mission as an artist and journalist was straightforward: "I did not report hearsay; I did not imagine, or fake, or improvise; I did not cuddle up with personal emotion, moral notion, or political opinion about War with a capital W. I reported in pictures what I saw with my own two eyes, wide open."

A native of El Paso, Texas, Lea was one of the first civilian artists hired by "Life" as a correspondent during World War II. His work in numerous theaters of operation required him to travel more than 100,000 miles during the war.

Lea risked his life to document combat ranging from convoy battles involving destroyers in the North Atlantic to the bloody beach assault during the Battle of Peleliu. His subjects ranged from admirals and generals to ordinary servicemen, but he felt a particular affinity for the men below decks and the Marines who faced some of the most ferocious combat of the entire war.

"First Wave -- Going In" (1944). (Image courtesy of The National World War II Museum)

His paintings ultimately became full-color spreads in 10 issues of "Life," reaching more than 30 million readers and providing a chilling perspective on the war.

Among the art displayed in the exhibit is perhaps Lea's most famous – and haunting – wartime painting, "That 2,000-Yard Stare." It has become one of the most iconic images of the effects of war on the human psyche.

"He left the States 31 months ago," Lea wrote about his subject, a combat Marine at Peleliu. "He was wounded in his first campaign. He has had tropical diseases. He half-sleeps at night and gouges Japs out of holes all day. Two-thirds of his company has been killed or wounded. He will return to attack this morning. How much can a human being endure?"

But the display also includes drawings and sketches of soldiers, sailors, airmen, and Marines engaged in the day-to-day and behind-the-scenes jobs that made the fighting possible.

Lea's painting "Sickbay in a Shellhole" (1944). (Image courtesy The National World War II Museum)

And then there is his painting of U.S. Navy chaplain John J. Malone experiencing combat for the first time as he does his best to help overwhelmed corpsmen treating casualties. "He was deeply and visibly moved by the patient suffering and death," Lea wrote. "He looked very lonely, very close to God, as he bent over the shattered men so far from home."

The exhibit helps people today understand Lea's contribution to how the public learned about World War II's events at a time when there was no cable or satellite news and no Internet to provide instantaneous coverage.

"As it is the museum's mission to tell the complete story of the American experience in World War II, it is critical that we share all aspects of the war - including stories about the courageous men and women who traveled overseas in order to share stories with anxious families back home," Decuers said. "Lea's work is a significant piece of World War II, and we're thrilled to share it at our institution."

For more information, call (877) 813-3329 or (504) 528-1944, or visit the museum on the Web at nationalww2museum.org.

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