History

This is what the Army's 'Iron Men of Metz' and Attila the Hun have in common

When the 95th Infantry Division joined the struggle in Northern France, they could not possibly have imagined the enormous task they would soon face. They landed in France in September and first entered combat towards the end of October. Their first actions were in support of the larger attack on the fortress city of Metz.


The last force to conquer the city was commanded by Attila the Hun in 415 AD, more than 1,500 years before WWII.

Game recognizes game.

While the city was always heavily defended, the French updated the fortifications prior to the Franco-Prussian War in 1870. These fortifications included some fifteen forts that ringed the city.

After France's capitulation in the Franco-Prussian War, the region of Alsace-Lorraine, which included Metz, was annexed by Germany.

Prior to the First World War, Germany enhanced the fortifications around Metz by adding an additional 28 forts and strongpoints in a second ring outside the first. When the French retook possession of the city after the war, they incorporated the new German defenses into the Maginot Line. This included upgrading many positions with rotating steel turrets housing artillery.

American forces first encountered these defenses in September 1944 after Patton's Third Army drive across France towards Germany came to a halt.

By October, when the 95th joined the fray, little progress had been made in cracking the cities defenses.

Beginning in early November, the division's first order of business was to secure several bridgeheads in the area. This was done under the guns of the German forts and against stiff resistance on the ground. 1st Battalion 377th Infantry Regiment reported over 50% losses after successfully making a river crossing at Uckange.

At the same time the 2nd Battalion, 378th Infantry Regiment secured a bridge at Thionville.

With the Americans approaching the forts, the Germans launched numerous counterattacks to drive them from their bridgeheads. All along the line the Americans threw the Germans back with heavy casualties.

Now with their positions across the river were secured, it was time to go to work on the forts.

Troops of 5th Infantry Division conducting a house-to-house search in Metz on Nov. 19, 1944.

Under the command of Colonel Robert Bacon, the two battalions that made the river crossing joined the division reconnaissance troop and a tank company to form Task Force Bacon.

The task force tore down the east bank of the Moselle towards Metz, capturing five towns in the first day. The next day, an additional six towns were captured by the task force. A journalist traveling with the task force described the attitude of its commander:

"Col. Bacon was given a self-propelled 155, but he didn't use it exactly as the books say it's supposed to be used. His idea of correct range for the big gun was about 200 yards. Result was that a considerable number of buildings required remodeling later."

That night the task force reached the outskirts of Metz.

While Task Force Bacon was giving the Germans hell, the rest of the division was driving down the west bank of the Moselle and reducing German forts. The division then executed an assault crossing of the river under heavy fire and also made their way into the outskirts of the city.

At this point, the outer ring of forts was broken and the men now faced the formidable inner ring.

The US Army's remodeling of Metz.

On Nov. 18, ten days after joining the fight for Metz, a patrol from the 95th linked up with elements of the 5th Infantry Division attacking from the south. They now had Metz surrounded.

The two divisions then launched an all-out attack on the city. As the men of the 5th Infantry Division stormed the forts to the south, the 95th instead decided to use deception.

Col. Samuel Metcalfe of the 378th Infantry Regiment, tasked with leading the assault, wanted to do an end run around the line of forts to his front but he needed to keep the Germans distracted to do so. A small task force of infantry and support personnel was left in front of the forts and told to make as much noise as possible. The trick worked like a charm and within several hours the regiment rolled up six of the forts from the rear.

As the onslaught continued, American forces entered the fortress city of Metz. It was an achievement unmatched in over 1,000 years.

Still the fighting continued.

Men of the 378th Infantry, 95th Division enter Metz (Nov. 17, 1944).

During the heavy fighting to take the city, the 95th Infantry Division had its first Medal of Honor recipient. Over the course of several days Sgt. Andrew Miller repeatedly led his squad in reducing German pillboxes and machine gun positions. Often single-handedly and at close range, Miller stormed the positions and captured German prisoners. At one point – outnumbered four-to-one – he convinced his would-be killers to instead surrender to him.

In a week of fighting in and around Metz, Miller was responsible for the destruction of at least five enemy machine gun emplacements, killing three German soldiers, and capturing 32. Unfortunately, Miller was killed in action a week after the capture of Metz while once again leading his men from the front.

During the valiant fighting, the war correspondents covering the battle took to calling the 95th Infantry Division "the bravest of the brave."

However, a more fitting name came when the division captured Lt. Gen. Heinrich Kittel, commander of the German garrison, who informed them of the name the Germans had bestowed upon them – "the Iron Men of Metz."

The division chose to adopt that as their official nickname.

95th Infantry Division members Frank Bever, left, Frank Pagliaro, John Komp, Charles "Red" Whittington, Stephen Jamison, Fred Stark, Stephen Bodnar and Ceo Bauer hold souvenir replicas of a newly-erected sign Friday, June 20, 2014, during a dedication ceremony of the Iron Men of Metz Memorial Bridge on U.S. 31. (Photo by Andrew Laker | The Republic)

The city was finally declared secure on the afternoon of Nov. 22. The Iron Men and the rest of Third Army then drove on into Germany.