Intel

Will the US military continue to fly the Confederate flag?


Photo: Flickr

The Confederate flag's dark and nuanced history has long made the rebel banner an uncomfortable topic of conversation. In the minds of many Americans, it is a symbol of slavery and institutionalized racism - an emblem on par with the Nazi swastika. For others, it's simply an expression of regional pride.

However, after the racially-motivated church slayings in South Carolina last week - committed by a man who was a proud flyer of the stars and bars - state governments have begun to remove the Confederate flag from their federal buildings. The United States military, on the other hand, has yet to address the issue officially.

South Carolina's Army Guard still flies 16 streamers that were created under the Confederacy, and servicemen and women are allowed to sport the Confederate flag on clothing and tattoos — something the Defense Department does not consider offensive material. Still, some military officials have decided to retire the flag after the shootings, including The Citadel, South Carolina's famous military academy, which removed the Confederate Naval Jack from its chapel.

Gen. Daniel Allyn, vice chief of the U.S. Army, spoke to the The Military Times about the rebel flag's importance within the American military:

"I think that, when you are a student of military history, let's face it: One of our greatest military generals in the history of our nation was Robert E. Lee," Allyn said, referring to the legendary Confederate commander.

At Army posts throughout the country, there are "thousands of battle pictorials of Grant and Lee going up against each other with their requisite flags," he added, noting Lee's Union counterpart, Gen. Ulysses Grant, who later became America's 18th president. "So yes, you will find those resident. And if those are offensive to people, I'm sure that our commanders will deal with that."

"We swear our allegiance to the flag of the United States of America," Allyn said, "... and we will protect and defend that flag."

For more on the topic, check out The Military Times >

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