The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time - We Are The Mighty
MIGHTY MOVIES

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time

Once in a blue moon, Hollywood pops out a really great military movie. Not only does the film have a compelling story, but it’s also rich in technical detail — so troops don’t have to sit through 90 minutes of “dubble yew-tee-eff” when looking at uniform inaccuracies or crazy plot-lines.


But we’re not talking about those movies here. We put our collective heads together to come up with the cheesiest military movies. These are the ones that made us wince, yell at the screen, or walk out of the theater to run to the nearest liquor store.

1. Navy SEALs

In between shooting terrorists, Navy SEALs play golf polo set to “The Boys are Back in Town.” And Charlie Sheen is a cocky jerk. So we guess it’s sort of realistic.

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time

 

 

2. The Hurt Locker

Yes, it won an Oscar. It’s also completely terrible. Put on your freakin’ EOD suit when you’re defusing bombs there, Rambo. And last time we checked, it wasn’t a good idea to leave your base at night in Iraq wearing nothing but a hoodie.

 

3. The Marine

Words fall short.

 

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time

4. Iron Eagle

Along with the help of a retired colonel, a teenage Air Force brat steals a couple of F-16 jets without anyone really noticing. Then they both manage to take on an (unnamed) Arab state’s air force and rescue his captured dad. But totally worth it just for the bad guy’s quote of “I want these pigs … destroyed.”

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time

5. Act of Valor

To the film’s credit, the action scenes with Navy SEALs taking down houses and shooting the hell out of enemy vehicles were top-notch. But the acting from those same real-life Navy SEALs was (understandably) forced and cheesy. And we were a bit disappointed the bad guys never said, “I want these pigs … destroyed.” And are you looking for a drinking game idea? Take a shot every time one of the SEALs calls another one “bro.”

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time

 

6. G.I. Jane

A woman gets picked to go through Navy SEAL training. Actually, the movie calls it “Combined Reconnaissance Training,” which isn’t even a thing. So besides getting the name of the training course wrong right out the gate, Lt. O’Neil (played by Demi Moore) goes through training, shaves her head, and does one-armed pushups. Then she saves the day when the trainees (yes, TRAINEES) participate in a rescue mission in Libya. O-kay. (Bonus points for the shower scene, though.)

 

7. Jarhead 2

While “Jarhead” is based on a book written by a Marine sniper and offered a fairly realistic depiction of infantry life and all its absurdities, “Jarhead 2” is a sequel that has nothing to do with the original, has a ridiculous plot, and follows around Marines who work in supply. Yes, SUPPLY.

 

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time

 

BONUS: Jonn over at This Ain’t Hell pointed this one out to us: “Flesh Wounds,” which he called the absolutely worst military movie ever made. To quote Jonn: “If you’re ever sitting around with your military friends and you want to have a contest counting the mistakes in a war movie, this is the one you want (if they can still see the movie through tears from laughter).”

Articles

Watch this Vietnam War vet school a young soldier in stunt driving

Bet you think you’re a good driver. No one can knife across three lanes of traffic and make an exit doing 73 mph like you can, hoss. You even throw around the occasional courtesy wave.


Former Army Engineer and “Oscar Mike” host Ryan Curtis fancied himself above average in the driving department until he met Jim Wilkey at Bobby Orr Motorsports, where the two-tour Vietnam Vet proceeded to hand our host his ass.

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time
The authentic look of a man being taken to school. (Go90 Oscar Mike screenshot)

A former Navy Seabee, Wilkey is now one of Hollywood’s most highly-regarded stunt drivers, flipping cars and drifting in such modest cinematic offerings as “The Dark Knight” trilogy and “Mad Max: Fury Road.”

When he’s not rolling on “action,” Wilkey teaches the art of stunt driving to amateur road warrior wannabes on his home track in Camarillo, CA.

Watch as Wilkey puts Ryan through a day’s worth of paces and Ryan makes an unwise decision to challenge the master in a timed stunt lap, in the video embedded at the top.

Watch more Oscar Mike:

This Iraq vet kayaker will make you rethink PTSD

This is why you don’t challenge an ex-sniper to a duel

This Army vet is crazy motivated

This is what happens when you put a sailor in a stock car

Articles

’13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi’ captures courage while avoiding politics

When the trailer for 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi dropped, netizens were quick to dub it “Bayghazi,” a portmanteau of the location of the now-infamous embassy attack and the name of director Michael Bay. But the film deserves more credit than that for a number of reasons, but mostly because it manages to celebrate the human elements of an otherwise overly-politicized event.


“We all think we know Benghazi,” Bay says. “But we all only really know so much. There was a great human story in Benghazi that was never told. It’s an inspirational movie, even though it’s tragic.”

The movie is a faithful retelling of the events on the ground during that day in the Libyan port city, as written in journalist Mitchell Zuckoff’s book 13 Hours: The Inside Account of What Really Happened in Benghazi, which he co-authored with the surviving security contractors who were on the ground. The way Zuckoff writes the story in the book lends itself to Michael Bay’s directing style.

“The book, when I read it, it was an amazing human experience,” Michael Bay says. “It’s my most realistic movie. I think it opens eyes to what they really go through. It’s a collection of 36 Americans coming together, figuring out how the hell to survive. It starts at 9:42 and we follow the waves and the adrenaline and the ebbs and flows for 13 hours.”

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time
(Paramount Pictures)

The movie is rife with commentary, damning of the military’s failure to act in support of the CIA annex in any way. Fighter planes remain motionless on flightlines while bureaucrats make late night phones calls to plan meetings, but the movie is inspirational, thanks to its exceptional cast. With the help of the real military veterans-turned CIA security contractors who were on the ground in Benghazi that night, they all deliver exceptional performances.

“There’s such a responsibility in this particular story,” says John Krasinski, who plays Jack Silva, one of the CIA contractors and former Navy SEAL. “Not only because it’s so highly politicized, but also because it’s so intense and is a story not really being told. For me, there was a great responsibility to make sure we told it right, especially since it’s about these six guys who are the definition of heroes.”

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time
(Paramount Pictures)

The real-life defenders of the Americans in Benghazi, the members of the annex security team who were on the ground, are unanimous in what they hope audiences will take away from the film: The truth.

“They got it right,” says Marc “Oz” Geist, one of the contractors at Benghazi. “When you watch the movie, you’re seeing the guys, you’re seeing the team,” Kris “Tanto” Peronto adds. “They did an excellent job. That shows a lot of work.”

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time

“You have a group of people who overcome what most would consider insurmountable odds,” Geist continues. “There are positives that comes from that. It’s not a negative thing. You’re gonna have troubles, you’re gonna have things go bad. We lost four people and that’s tragic, but that’s not the defining moment. The defining moment is that we never lost because we never quit.”

The film has all the hallmarks of its director’s signature style: slow shots of dialogue between characters contrast fast-paced action with explosions; a weak leader gets usurped when the “right thing to do” becomes apparent, even though it isn’t “by the book;” and what starts as a rescue turns out to be an epic battle for survival. Yet all of it is a faithful retelling of the Benghazi story, seconded by the guys who were there that night, right down to the funny one-liners of comic relief (called “Tantoisms” by the Benghazi team).

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time
(Paramount Pictures)

The portrayals of the team are realistic and intense. Anyone who’s ever met Navy SEALs, Marine Scout Snipers, Army Rangers, or any other special forces operators will recognize the personalities portrayed on screen by Krasinski, James Badge Dale (“Rone”), Pablo Schreiber (“Tanto”), David Denman (“Boon”), Max Martini (“Oz”), and Dominic Fumusa (“Tig”).

“It’s about the human spirit and the will to win,” the directors said. “No one ordered them to go. They volunteered and they volunteered at the drop of a hat. At a time when there’s so much crap going on in the world, you are appreciative that people like this exist.”

 

13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi is in theaters today. Follow the film on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

 

MIGHTY MOVIES

Two Scottish combat veterans define the term Strongman, as one helps the other train for the first-ever Arnold Schwarzenegger Disabled Strongman Competition

“The measure of a man is how you react on a bad day.”

Powerful words that three-time World’s Strongest Man and Sports Hall-of-Famer Bill Kazmaier used to describe one of the newest Strongman competitors – Stevie Richardson – at the World’s Strongman competition in Ohio.

Richardson fulfilled a lifelong dream by serving his country in the Army but his service was cut short when an IED detonated in Afghanistan and took his legs. Soon after Richardson returned home and started his long road to recovery, he met a fellow vet, Royal Marines Commando and competitive Strongman, Kenny Simm, and was introduced to the world of Strongman competition.


IED – Improve Every Day – Official Trailer. BBC Scotland, Gravitas Ventures, TurnerGang Productions

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The story of these two combat veterans and their journey to find purpose, camaraderie and pride after coming home from war is the basis for the new documentary IED: Improve Every Day. The film shows how a veteran’s bond is undying and that no injury, physical or psychological, can stand up to the strength forged by the military brotherhood.

Competing for Arnold in the World Strongman Championship is certainly a milestone event in the lives of these veterans but it also marks a new chapter for them on the road to recovery. Their journey of self-strengthening will be life-long but valuable lessons can be gleaned from the story told in Improve Every Day; that our strength can quite-often be measured by the comrades we keep around us and no matter how bad our days get, there is always a new, inspiring challenge waiting for us in the future.

Watch this multi-award nominated BBC documentary on Amazon Prime, Youtube, Google play and many other platforms. Search IED: Improve Every Day.

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time
The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time
The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time
The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time
The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time


MIGHTY MOVIES

‘Falcon and Winter Soldier’ pilot sets up an emotional ride

Marvel has proved itself to be a master of balancing action and high stakes with compelling heroes navigating realistic emotional experiences. The pilot episode of The Falcon and the Winter Soldier could have been a basic buddy cop series, but instead the creators have set up a show that will explore trauma and PTSD and systemic racism while deconstructing modern America and its flaws. It hit its emotional beats succinctly and set up its two heroes — without even uniting them yet. 

Spoilers ahead.

The episode begins with a cool opening, showing off Anthony Mackie’s Sam Wilson AKA The Falcon and his wingéd suit. After thirteen years of action sequences, Marvel’s creative teams keep finding ways to get creative — in this case, Wilson teams up with U.S. military forces to recover a soldier kidnapped by wingsuit terrorists led by Georges Batroc, the acrobatic terrorist from Captain America: The Winter Soldier. 

Wilson is aided by a soon-to-be-fan-favorite Joaquin Torres, who gives intel support from the ground and, after their mission success, fanboys a bit over Wilson and asks him to confirm a conspiracy theory that Steve Rogers is operating on the moon. This slyly reminds us that the Avengers are famous, and while we know their stories, the people in their world don’t necessarily. 

In fact, most civilians in the Marvel Cinematic Universe are normal people living out their lives, watching aliens attack Manhattan, trying to cope as half of the population disintegrated into ash then reintegrated five years later. Those kinds of events have taken a toll — including radicalizing terrorist groups, whom we’ll see later in this episode, and impacting the economy, as we’ll also see. 

Wilson returns to D.C. to do “moon stuff,” where he offers the Captain America shield to the Smithsonian for Steve Rogers’ exhibit. Wilson still doesn’t feel worthy of the mantle of Captain America. His sister struggles to keep the family fishing business afloat — pun intended — and she doesn’t blink an eye when they are denied a loan from the bank, in spite of Wilson’s fame and status. He’s not the only person who had no source of income for the past five years (due to being snapped out of existence by Thanos) and now needs financial assistance. The undertones of the scene show that systemic racism is at hand as well.

Next we catch up with a haunted Bucky Barnes, who, despite his healing respite in Wakanda, suffers from symptoms of PTSD. He has nightmares and carries guilt from his 90 years of enslavement as a brainwashed assassin for HYDRA and the Soviet Union. He has a notebook filled with names of people he hopes to make amends to, including an older man grieving the mysterious death of his son — a man who was in the wrong place at the wrong time and was killed by the Winter Soldier. 

His therapist offers an insightful observation that should resonate with many veterans: “I was an excellent soldier, so I saw a lot of dead bodies and I know how that can shut you down. And if you are alone, that is the quietest, most personal hell. And James, it is very hard to escape.”

With both of their introductions, we can see that Sam is trying to figure out who he is. He’s comfortable being an airman — but he’s not ready to be Captain America and carry the weight of all Steve Rogers stood for. 

Bucky was a good man who spent almost a hundred years doing terrible things. He was basically still a kid when he enlisted and was taken captive by HYDRA. In one scene, he brings a date flowers and she calls him “adorably old-fashioned.” Sebastian Stan’s acting in that moment is very nuanced; he captures Bucky’s vulnerability beautifully. His family grew old and died while he was enslaved by HYDRA, his best friend returned home to the past without him, and now all he has for company is his guilt and trauma.

It’s clear the two will need each other, which sets up their future friendship for a satisfying connection. Meanwhile, young Torres has uncovered a terrorist cell aided by an operator with superhuman strength, which points the way this series will go. 

The most painful moment came at the end of the episode when the U.S. announced that there will be a new Captain America afterall — not Sam, the rightful shield-bearer, but some smarmy white chap. So that’s awkward.

MIGHTY MOVIES

6 reasons why veteran characters would ruin horror flicks

In order for a horror film to work, you need to have relatable characters. The more easily the audience can put themselves in the shoes of the cast, the more real the terror. That’s why, when a horror film is geared towards a younger crowd, the characters are primarily teenagers who are made to be as average and generic as possible.

Of course, while veterans come from every walk of life, one thing they all have in common is that they aren’t average. We’re generally brash, crude, and perform well in environments that would freeze your average horror film character.


And to be fair, there have been horror films that feature characters with military backgrounds, like Predator. The problem here is that troops and vets would easily turn any horror film into an action film. In fact, the 2018 sequel to the Schwarzenegger classic seems to be embracing this action/horror dynamic of “vets versus monster.”

But here’s why vets wouldn’t make the best fit in most horror flicks:

We’re not easily scared

Veterans often have a desensitized “fight or flight” reflex. When vets are spooked, it’s rare for them to freeze in place or scream like children. They’re conditioned to hop right into fight mode.

If a twig snaps, vets look in that direction. When someone screams off in the distance, they’re not just going to shrug it off and continue their party in the middle of the woods.

We would organize survivors

Veterans instinctively take control of situations when everyone stands around confused. It doesn’t need to be a life-or-death situation, either. At a kid’s birthday party, for example, vets expertly knifehand their way into getting balloons inflated and cake cut.

Vets would identify who’s useful and smack some sense into the idiots that say, “let’s split up!”

We could make due with few resources

In horror films, survivors often run around looking for supplies. Most would probably settle for finding a pair of safety scissors that they would then inexplicably throw at the unkillable monster.

Meanwhile, the veteran has fashioned a ghillie suit using mud, sticks, and leaves and they’ve found the sturdiest club they could get their hands on — and set it on fire.

We’d probably be carrying

Chances are, the veteran probably doesn’t need to scavenge. The moment the idiot who went skinny-dipping starts screaming bloody murder, a veteran would chamber a round.

Unless the vet is fighting some supernatural force, the credits would start rolling shortly after the knife-wielding clown starts rushing them.

We know how to actually run and start cars

From the most macho grunt to the wimpiest supply guy, everyone has done Land Nav enough times to not trip on their own feet every ten seconds while running through the forest.

If the monster couldn’t be shot to death, the vet probably wouldn’t even bother and, instead, leave. Especially if the monster just comes at them at a walking pace…

We’ve secretly been preparing for this forever

Ask any veteran why they stockpiled arms and supplies and they may joke that it’s for the zombie apocalypse. The moment an actual zombie apocalypse happens, that cache is definitely coming in handy.

We also have at least seven different plans on what to do in every situation. Catching us completely off-guard isn’t a realistic plot point.

*Bonus* The downside to being a veteran in a horror film

But realistically our f*ck-off attitude would get us killed. The masked killer would probably show up, covered in blood, and we’d mock them for whatever reason. That’s maybe not the best idea…

MIGHTY MOVIES

The 9 most essential World War II books

From action-packed eyewitness accounts such as Guadalcanal Diary to devastating Holocaust memoirs like The Diary of Anne Frank and Night to the thrilling espionage tale of Operation Mincemeat, World War II is the subject of some of the most fascinating and influential nonfiction books ever written. Every year, seemingly dozens of new titles emerge to offer fresh perspectives and uncover fascinating details about the deadliest conflict in human history. These nine classics cover the war from the Eastern Front to the South Pacific and investigate its murky origins and complex legacies. Make your next great read one of these essential World War II books.


1. Hiroshima

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time
Vintage; Reprint edition

By John Hersey

Originally published in the August 31, 1946 issue of The New Yorker, this compassionate and richly observed portrait of six survivors of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima caused an immediate sensation. It was the first–and only–time the magazine had devoted an entire issue to a single article. Newsstands sold out within hours, and radio stations interrupted their regular programming to broadcast readings of the complete text.

More than a year after the Japanese city was destroyed, Americans were getting the first full account of the horrors of nuclear warfare. Hersey described stone facades permanently etched with the silhouettes of vaporized people and soldiers whose eyes were melted by the atomic flash. Widely recognized as one of the earliest examples of New Journalism (the style of reporting made most famous by Joan Didion), Hiroshima profoundly impacted the debate over nuclear weapons and played a key role in the healing process between America and Japan.

2. With the Old Breed: At Peleliu and Okinawa

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time
Presidio Press

By E.B. Sledge

With brutal honesty and lucid prose, Eugene Bondurant Sledge provides a grunt’s-eye view of infantry combat in the Pacific Theater of World War II. Nicknamed “Sledgehammer” by his comrades, Sledge fought with the 1st Marine Division in the grueling battles of Peleliu and Okinawa. Using notes he secretly kept in a pocket-sized New Testament, Sledge describes the terror of life on the front lines and documents acts of savagery committed by both sides. But he also admires the courage of his fellow soldiers and pauses, when he can, to observe his natural surroundings–an interest that would lead to a later career as a biology professor. With the Old Breed was one of the main sources for Ken Burns’s documentary The War and helped to form the basis for the HBO mini-series The Pacific.

3. The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time
RosettaBooks

By William Shirer

First published in 1960, this National Book Award winner and New York Times bestseller traces the rise and fall of Nazi Germany from Adolf Hitler’s birth in 1889 to the end of World War II in 1945. As a foreign correspondent for the Chicago Tribune and one of “Murrow’s Boys” at the CBS Radio Network, Shirer reported from Berlin and Vienna in the years before the war and followed the German Army during the invasion of France.

After the war, he drew on his own experiences and a wealth of newly available documents, including the diaries of propaganda minister Joseph Goebbels and General Franz Halder and testimony from the Nuremberg trials, to write this 1,250-page volume. The book was a huge commercial success, selling one million hardcover copies and going through twenty printings in its first year. Although its scholarly reputation is often debated, The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich remains one of the most influential tomes about World War II to this day.

4. Maus

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group

By Art Spiegelman

This Pulitzer Prize-winning graphic novel recasts the Holocaust with Nazis as cats, Jews as mice, and Poles as pigs. Originally serialized in the alternative comics magazine Raw, the story moves back and forth between present-day Rego Park, New York and Nazi-occupied Poland. In New York, cartoonist Art Spiegelman tries to mend his fractured relationship with his father, Vladek, by drawing a book-length comic based on Vladek’s wartime experiences. In Poland, Vladek and his wife, Anja, endure forced relocation to the Sosnowiec Ghetto; the death of their first son, Richieu; and imprisonment in the Auschwitz concentration camp.

Hailed by The Wall Street Journal as “the most affecting and successful narrative ever done about the Holocaust,” Maus elevated the critical reputation of comics and inspired countless artists, including Chris Ware, Alison Bechdel, and Marjane Satrapi.

5. The Longest Day

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time
Simon & Schuster

By Cornelius Ryan

Based on interviews with more than 1,100 D-Day survivors, The Longest Day is the definitive account of the Allied invasion of Normandy on June 6, 1944. Ryan experienced the battle firsthand as a 24-year-old reporter for the Daily Telegraph. When the bomber he was flying in was hit and had to return to England, he jumped into a patrol boat and returned to cover the fighting on the French beaches. Fifteen years later, Ryan set out to tell “what actually happened, rather than what generals or others thought happened.” The result is a masterpiece of military history packed with novelistic details, from the U.S. paratrooper who won $2,500 at cards on the eve of the battle but deliberately lost it all so as not to run out of luck to Field Marshal Rommel’s reason for being 600 miles away when the invasion began–he was bringing his wife her birthday present.

6. In the Garden of Beasts

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time
Broadway Books

By Erik Larson

This #1 New York Times bestseller is the riveting story of William E. Dodd, the American ambassador to Germany from 1933 to 1937. Dodd, a history professor, was not Franklin D. Roosevelt’s first choice for the job, and he arrived in Berlin with little appetite for the endless socializing expected of a diplomat and little sense of the dangers posed by Germany’s newly-appointed chancellor, Adolf Hitler.

While Dodd struggled to find his place, his 24-year-old daughter, Martha, took to her glamorous new life with verve. Beautiful and sexually adventurous, her high-profile paramours included Rudolph Diels, the chief of the Gestapo, and Boris Winogradov, an attache to the Soviet Embassy who recruited her as a spy. Part political thriller, part family drama, In the Garden of Beasts brings fresh perspective to the question of why it took the world so long to recognize the threat of the Third Reich.

7. An Army at Dawn

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time
Henry Holt and Co.

By Rick Atkinson

While most American history buffs are well versed in the Allied push across Europe after the Normandy landings and the key battles for control of the Pacific, the North African campaign is a less familiar subject. Drawing on personal diaries and letters from soldiers as well as official documents kept in British, American, French, Italian, and German war archives, Rick Atkinson corrects the record in this Pulitzer Prize-winning history, the first volume in The Liberation Trilogy. From the amphibious invasion of Morocco and Algeria in November 1942 to the Allies’ watershed victory at the Second Battle of El Alamein and the US Army’s coming-of-age at the Battle of Hill 609 in Tunisia, An Army at Dawn seamlessly integrates big-picture military strategy with boots-on-the-ground perspective. Atkinson is particularly insightful on the clash of egos between the old-school British commanders and their upstart American counterparts.

8. Stalingrad: The Fateful Siege: 1942-1943

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time
Penguin Books

By Anthony Beevor

With more than one million casualties, the five-month siege of Stalingrad was the bloodiest battle of World War II and a decisive turning point in the fight for Europe. Antony Beevor, a former British Army officer, brilliantly balances the huge scale of the conflict with a soldier’s-eye view of some of the most horrific conditions in the history of modern warfare.

He begins with Operation Barbarossa, the 1941 German invasion of the Soviet Union that was plagued by bad weather, long supply lines, and difficult terrain, and analyzes how the Luftwaffe’s carpet bombing of Stalingrad helped to create the treacherous, rubble-strewn conditions that allowed Soviet snipers to wage a gruesome war of attrition. Most captivatingly, Atkinson portrays Stalingrad as the terrifying outcome of totalitarianism: Hitler lived in a fantasy world and refused to listen to German officers who tried to save the Sixth Army from complete destruction, while Stalin’s demands for total obeisance resulted in the executions of 13,500 Red Army soldiers.

9. Human Smoke: The Beginnings of World War II, the End of Civilization

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time
Simon & Schuster

By Nicholson Baker

In this highly unusual and captivating work, novelist Nicholson Baker tells the story of the buildup to World War II in vignettes. Each short piece contains a fact or a quotation drawn from primary sources including newspaper articles, radio speeches, personal diaries, and government transcripts.

Through the steady accumulation of detail, Baker suggests that Allied leaders were not as reluctant to enter the global conflict as most historians contend. He goes back to as far as 1920 to quote Winston Churchill on the proposed bombing of civilian targets in Iraq (“I am strongly in favor of using poisoned gas against uncivilized tribes”), then skips ahead to the prime minister’s preferred military strategy in 1941: “One of our great aims is the delivery on German towns of the largest possible quantity of bombs per night.” Turning to the American scene, Baker draws from sources suggesting that Franklin D. Roosevelt may have deliberately goaded the Japanese into bombing Pearl Harbor so the US could enter the war.

Some scholars were harsh in their judgment of Human Smoke, but by returning to the primary material, Baker rescues pacifism as an honorable concept and reminds readers that when military leaders rush to apply new technologies to warfare, it is often civilians who suffer the most.

This article originally appeared on Explore The Archive. Follow @explore_archive on Twitter.

MIGHTY MOVIES

Let’s dive deep into ‘Star Trek’ transporter technology

The internet is a giant dumpster fire but it is made slightly redeemable based on pop-culture content shared by your favorite Air Force vet random and completely unnecessary but much-needed gems like the reviews of the Three Wolf Moon shirt or everything surrounding the Storm Area 51 event.

The internet also gives us access to hot takes we never knew we needed, like Sean Kelly’s deepest, most pure thoughts on Star Trek transporters.
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In the Star Trek franchise, a matter transportation device — or “transporter” — dematerializes matter (humanoids, objects, etc) and sends their constituent particles in the form of energy to another location before reconverting them back to their original form.

It’s cool futuristic technology, but it also makes for convenient story-telling. Need to get your characters down to that strange alien ship? Energize away! Need to rescue them in the knick of time before a singularity in a planetary core destroys them all? Beam them up, Scotty, and don’t be a b**** about it!

But, as Kelly points out, there are some missed opportunities for the inhabitants of the many Star Trek worlds when it comes to transporter capabilities. Why? Well, because television is only entertaining when the characters have obstacles to overcome.
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Still, thanks to Kelly, we can debate the implications of transporter potential to our little hearts’ content. From medicinal achievements to murder, those transporters could do some crazy sh** if Star Trek writers wanted them to.

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I mean, Star Trek has very horny roots, so I’m honestly surprised this hasn’t happened yet. Maybe in Season 2 of Picard?

After mulling over some pretty basic possibilities for transporter use, Kelly starts to spiral exceptionally into Riker’s soul, Mirror Universe bisexuals, and rather creative weaponry implications.

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Not to mention the Ship of Theseus Paradox, which fans of The Prestige might be familiar with. The paradox poses the philosophical question about whether a ship that has systematically had all of its parts replaced is actually the same ship at the end of the journey. In other words, if a person’s matter is dematerialized, will that actual person rematerialize on the other end — or have they essentially died while their copy continues to live?

F*** it! Sign us up!

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MIGHTY MOVIES

Rumor says Ghost Rider is on his way to the Avengers

You might have noticed that the ranks of the Avengers are a bit thinner than before. Iron Man and Black Widow died, Captain America retired, and Spider-Man fell victim to…a corporate squabble between Sony and Disney. Kevin Feige, the president of Marvel Studios, knows this.

The only question, then, isn’t if the Avengers will get some reinforcements but which characters from the Marvel canon those reinforcements will be. According to Daniel Richtman, a writer with a history of Marvel scoops, Feige wants Ghost Rider to be among those joining the MCU.


What’s less clear is which Ghost Rider we’re going to get. Will it be Johnny Blaze, who sold his soul to save his father and subsequently rode around on a flaming motorcycle? Or could it be Danny Ketch, who found a mystical motorcycle the night his sister was murdered?

As a side note, it was the Johnny Blaze version that Nicholas Cage played in 2007’s Ghost Rider and its 2011 sequel Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance. The absolute nuttiest thing Feige could do would be bringing Cage back and making those two pretty forgettable movies MCU canon. But we’re not holding our breath.

Another possibility is that Robbie Reyes, a Mexican-American from East L.A. who rides around in a black muscle car instead of a motorcycle, comes on board.

We also shouldn’t discount the fact that, in the modern MCU where there are, really, no rules (remember the snap?), that we get more than one Ghost Rider at once. There could be a movie version based on Johnny Blaze and a TV series centering on Robbie Reyes simultaneously.

The truth is we just don’t know yet, and we’ll probably have to wait a while to both confirm that Ghost Rider is joining the Avengers and learn which Ghost Rider (and on which medium) he or she will be appearing.

This article originally appeared on Fatherly. Follow @FatherlyHQ on Twitter.

MIGHTY MOVIES

The coolest souvenir at Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge won’t cost you a dime

After you sink money into travel, tickets, and blue milk at Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge you might not have much cash left over for a customized lightsaber or droid. Thankfully, there’s one souvenir you can take home that won’t cost you a dime: an only-available-at-Galaxy’s Edge drink coaster.

The coasters are available at Oga’s Cantina. As you can see in the images below, shared by some of the lucky few who’ve experienced the park pre-opening day, there are several different designs to choose from, with Star Wars icons like Ewoks and Banthas. Designs featuring a Rancor and the T-16 Skyhopper are also available.


There’s already a fairly vibrant market on eBay for the coasters, along with the souvenir mugs you can also pick up at the bar. There’s the Endor mug that holds the Yub Nub, a concoction of pineapple and spiced rums, citrus juices, and passion fruit, and the Cliff Dweller, a kid-friendly blend of citrus juices, coconut, hibiscus-grenadine, and Ginger Ale.

Parents who don’t want the upcharge of a souvenir mug can sip on cocktails like the Jedi Mind Trick, the Dagobah Slug Slinger, and Fuzzy Tauntaun. There are also beers brewed especially for the bar with names like White Wampa Ale, Gamorrean Ale, and Bad Motivator IPA.

And if you don’t feel like getting tipsy at a theme park, opt for a sugar rush from non-alcoholic beverages like the Hyperdrive (Punch It!), a mixture of Mountain Berry Blast Powerade, white cranberry juice, black cherry puree, and Sprite. (Your kids will probably like those too.)T

his article originally appeared on Fatherly. Follow @FatherlyHQ on Twitter.

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9 fictional characters that would make great drinking buddies

Picking a reliable drinking buddy in the military is a difficult decision to make. You don’t want someone who brings too much drama to the table, but you also don’t want someone who isn’t interesting.


Since drinking is about having fun and getting to know other people, having someone who can serve as an awesome wingman can make your evening out that much better.

Related: 7 reasons why ‘Top Gun’ made you want to become a fighter pilot

Check out our list of fictional drinking buddies we’d like to toss a few back with.

1. Gunny Highway (Heartbreak Ridge)

He can eat concertina wire, piss napalm, and put a round through a flea’s ass at 200 meters. We’d love to see that after tossing a few back.

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time
He also probably brings beer to the field. (Source: WB/ Screenshot)

2. Topper Harley (Hot Shots! Part Deux)

Because a fighter who battles his competition with gummy bears and sprinkles honey-glued to his fists, better know how to hold his liquor.

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time
We would have chosen crushed jolly ranchers and jaw-breakers bits. (Source: Fox/Screenshot)

3. Col. Walter E. Kurtz (Apocalypse Now)

For someone who was bat-sh*t crazy and a genius at the same time — you know he has some crazy drinking stories to tell.

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time
A diamond through your brain? That’s cool. (Source: MGM/Screenshot)

4. Lt. Aldo Raine (Inglourious Basterds)

This guy snorts tobacco and cuts Nazi swastikas into his enemy’s foreheads. Why wouldn’t you want him as your drinking buddy?

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time
Plus, it would take a few beers before we’d ask him how he got that badass scar on his throat. (Source: Weinstein Company/ Screenshot)

5. Animal Mother (Full Metal Jacket)

After smashing a few shots, he’d be the first guy to have your back during a bar brawl.

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time
I need a beer! (Source: WB/Screenshot)

6. Pvt. Valentine (Private Valentine: Blonde Dangerous)

Since she’s a “looker,” she’ll be able to bring her hot friends to the bar for you to meet. It’s a win-win situation.

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time
She wears that shirt well. (Source: Oasis Films/ Screenshot)

7. Bill Kilgore (Apocalypse Now)

This Army renegade loves the smell of napalm in the morning and killing the enemy while shirtless. You know he has some epic stories that only come out with some expensive scotch.

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time
(Source: MGM/Screenshot)

8. Gunny Hartman (Full Metal Jacket)

Before his untimely murder in the first act, this fair but tough drill instructor probably had some hilarious stories of how he used to mind f*ck Marine recruits.

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time
I ordered a double whiskey you miserable puke! (Source: WB/ Screenshot)

Also Read: 7 life lessons we learned from Gunny Highway in ‘Heartbreak Ridge’

9. Maverick (Top Gun)

Who else would be your wingman at the bar, fly inverted, and then go buzz the tower during the after party with you?

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time

Who would be on your list of drinking buddies? Comment below.

MIGHTY MOVIES

The new Snakes Eyes movie looks as awesome as he is

After being delayed over a year by COVID, Snake Eyes: G.I. Joe Origins is scheduled for release in theaters on July 23, 2021. The film stars Henry Golding of Crazy Rich Asians fame as the titular character. As the film’s name states, it also serves as an origin story for the classic character and reboots the G.I. Joe film series.

Golding replaces Darth Maul actor Ray Park who portrayed Snake Eyes in previous G.I. Joe films. The reboot also stars Andrew Koji as Storm Shadow, Úrsula Corberó as The Baroness, Samara Weaving as Scarlett, Haruka Abe as Akiko, Tahehiro Hira as Kenta, and Iko Uwais as Hard Master.

After saving the life of the heir apparent to the ancient Japanese Arashikage clan, tenacious loner Snake Eyes is welcomed by the family. In Japan, the Arashikage teach him the ways of the ninja warrior and give him the home he has been searching for. However, when secrets of his past come to light, Snake Eyes’ honor and allegiance will be tested.

Snake Eyes: G.I. Joe Origins was directed by Robert Schwentke who also directed the action films Red and R.I.P.D. Filming began in October 2019 in Vancouver and wrapped in February 2020 in Japan. Originally scheduled to release on March 27, 2020, the film was delayed due to COVID. In March 2021, Golding announced that they were doing reshoots for the film. As COVID restrictions lift across the country, Snake Eyes: G.I. Joe Origins is now slated for a theatrical release on July 23, 2021 in RealD 3D, Dolby Cinema and IMAX.

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time
(Paramount Pictures)
MIGHTY MOVIES

6 DC comic heroes who served in the Army

In the early days of comic strips, they were often more political cartoon than art enjoyed by adults and kids. This was until Malcolm Wheeler-Nicholson released the very first comic book, 1935’s New Fun, under his new company, National Allied Publications.  Through a series of mergers and buyouts, this company would eventually evolve into the comic giant, DC Comics. Before this, however, Wheeler-Nicholson served in the U.S. Army and was widely known as the “youngest major in the Army” at 27.


Just as many of the Marvel superheroes have pulled inspiration from Stan Lee’s time in the Army, many DC heroes followed Wheeler-Nicholson.

Related: 7 Marvel superheroes that served in the Army

Here are six DC heroes that served in the Army. Not all of them have superpowers, but then again, neither does Batman.

6. Jonah Hex

Jonah Hex‘s story begins in the Civil War where he was a southerner fighting for the Confederacy. His conscience held him back from fighting abolitionists, with whom he agreed philosophically, and he eventually surrendered his forces.

Tried for treason and exiled to the Wild West, Hex would later be branded with the mark of the demon and be forced to walk the west as a supernatural bounty hunter. At some point, he’d also travel time (because comic logic) and fight alongside other superheroes.

 

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time

He also fought alongside Yosemite Sam. Yeah, the Looney Toons’ Yosemite Sam. (Image via DC Comics)

5. Deathstroke (Slade Wilson)

DC’s greatest and deadliest assassin, Deathstroke, cut his teeth in the Special Forces before he was experimented on, giving him super-human strength, agility, senses, and healing. It’s a very similar storyline to Marvel’s Wade Wilson, aka Deadpool, even though Deathstroke came out 10 years earlier.

Contrary to how he’s portrayed in many mediums, he’s actually a completely neutral agent, only interested in fighting heroes for a price. His strict moral code prevents him from hurting innocents and he’s even been known to fight on the side of good when the price is right.

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time
He’s also one of the few who can go toe-to-toe with everyone in the Justice League. (Image via DC Comics)

4. John Diggle

A more recent addition to DC comic continuity is John Diggle. Originally created for the CW show, Arrow, his character is a bodyguard and close friend to the eponymous Green Arrow. Fans immediately loved the character as he helped Oliver Queen deal with his tragic yet over-the-top comic backstory by sharing his time with Special Forces in Afghanistan.

Though not originally a comic book character, he was given a life in print when DC rebooted many of their series as part of the “New 52.” His comic-book origin story follows his on-screen past very closely.

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time
DC is really cool with making badassery a superpower. (The CW’s Arrow)

3. Wonder Woman (Diana Prince of Themyscira)

Diana Prince has had a long military career. In more recent storylines, she’s portrayed as an Air Force Intelligence Officer, but she’s most recognized for her WWII-era stories as an Army nurse where she first took the name, “Diana Prince,” to enlist.

At the time, the Amazonian Princess didn’t take kindly to being relegated to being the secretary when she was literally the strongest member of the Justice Society of America (Superman and Batman hadn’t joined at this point). So, she up and left to fight in WWII where she met the sometimes-Army, sometimes-Air Force, sometimes-Navy SEAL, Steve Trevor, as fans would recognize from the 2017 film.

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time
Sassy comebacks is another one of her superpowers. (Image via DC Comics)

2. Sgt. Franklin Rock

One of the more surreal storylines in DC Comics’ history is that of Sgt. Rock. Very rarely did these comics ever deal with over-the-top action and silly, convoluted plots. Simply put, Sgt. Rock was just the story of the average soldiers of Easy Company during WWII, serving their country.

Sgt. Rock and his men were the musings of Army veteran, writer, and, eventually, executive editor, Robert Kanigher. Many events that happen during his run of Sgt. Rock are based on his real-life battles. After other writers took over his character, things took on a more outrageous, comic-book feel. Even Sgt. Rock’s service number — 409966 — is said to have belonged to Kanigher.

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time
Write what you know, am I right? (Image via DC Comics)

1. Superman (very briefly)

That’s right, every other branch: The Man of Steel himself served in the U.S. Army. Unfortunately, it only lasted for one cross-over issue and because of time travel (because comic logic).

Very long story short, Superman brought a bomb that was going to destroy modern-day Paris into space, but it flung him back in time to WWII where he met with Sgt. Rock and Easy Company (which was very grounded in reality until this point). The blast gave him amnesia (because comic logic) and he assumes the identity of Corporal Steel to fight with the Americans. They stumble upon a Nazi program to create “Ubermensch” soldiers and Superman, realizing Ubermensch roughly means “super men” in German, regains his memory and remembers he has powers.

Superman beats all the fake Nazi copies of him and, to preserve his identity, fakes his own death before heading back to the future (because comic logic).

The 7 cheesiest military movies of all time
Nobody ever said comic books weren’t weird sometimes. (Image via DC Comics)

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