MIGHTY CULTURE

Scott Eastwood thinks It’s time you start buying goods that are Made Here, in America

And now he's launching a company to help you do just that.

We've all seen the labels on our clothes, our cars and everything in between. As much as we hate to admit it, sometimes it's cheaper (and easier) to buy products that aren't made here in the good ole' U.S. of A.

Actor Scott Eastwood (The Outpost, Fury) and his business partner, serial entrepreneur Dane Chapin, are on a mission to change that story. Along the way, they're highlighting some amazing American workers, companies and veterans.

"Supporting the American worker is not a political issue. It's just what we should do," Chapin said in an exclusive interview with We Are The Mighty. Chapin's latest venture? Partnering with actor Scott Eastwood to cofound Made Here, a company dedicated to selling American-made goods.

"Made Here exists to celebrate the excellence of the American worker by exclusively partnering with American manufacturers to make, market and license the best goods this country has to offer," Chapin explained. Eastwood echoed his comments, adding, "The feeling of pride in our country that we share is something that is expressed in our products."

And just like its incredible mission, Made Here has one hell of a story.


A commitment to service is more than a nice sentiment or a long-lost ideal for Chapin and Eastwood. For both men, it's personal. Chapin's father served in the Army and spent much of his time helping injured veterans before he passed away. Chapin continues to honor that legacy in his work and in personal projects, such as supporting the Encinitas VFW. Eastwood's father (you might have heard of him - Clint?) was scheduled to deploy to Korea when he was in a plane crash, returning from a visit with his parents. The plane went down in the ocean en route from Seattle to Eastwood's then duty station, Fort Ord. The Independent Journal from Oct. 1, 1951, reported:

Two servicemen, who battled a thick gray fog and a strong surf for almost an hour last night following a plane landing in the ocean near the Marin shore, are returning to their service units today uninjured.
Army Pvt. Clinton Eastwood, who wandered into the RCA radio station at Point Reyes after struggling in the ocean, told radio operators he and the pilot were forced to land their AD-2 bomber in the ocean and left on life rafts."

While that grit and resilience is certainly what Clint is known for, perhaps lesser known is that he instilled those qualities in his son. Scott is bringing that same passion and determination to Made Here.

"When Dane approached me about this idea a few years ago, I was automatically and immediately all in," Eastwood shared. "For hundreds of years, 'American-made' has been synonymous with high quality," he said. "It's all the hard-working folks across the country that make our brand possible. I want to honor the iconic heritage of American manufacturing and let people know it's very much alive and well."

The company did a soft launch last month on their website and are ecstatic to be partnering with Amazon to launch a Made Here store front later this month. While Made Here is currently limited to apparel, Eastwood and Chapin have hopes to expand their product line as they move forward. "We'd love nothing more than to showcase all types of products," Chapin said. "And the more veteran-owned and military-spouse owned businesses we can highlight, the better. We can never repay the debt of service we owe our veterans and military families, but American workers and manufacturers are what make our country the best in the world. We want people to know what they're buying and feel good about their purchases, and what a benefit to be supporting those who have served us."

While Made Here in and of itself is incredible, equally impressive is their "In a Day" series they launched, showcasing what Americans can accomplish in just 24 hours. Eastwood and Chapin couldn't think of a better place to start than 24 hours on the USS Nimitz. "I couldn't believe how down to earth, humble and hard-working those people were," Eastwood said. Chapin added, "We joked about how they're all working 'half-days,' recognizing that their 12 hour half-day is more than most people do in a full day. It was a once-in-a-lifetime experience."

Made Here is here to stay and WATM couldn't be more excited to cheer this company on as it promotes American workers and American ideals. "At a time when the country is so divided," Chapin said, "we can all get behind supporting one another and buying goods that are Made Here."