Chaplains are some of the most misunderstood troops in the formation. While they're exempt from the minor stresses of the military, like going to the range or pointless details, they're not above doing the one thing every troop is expected to do: deploy.

This puts them in a unique position. Sure, they have an assistant that's kind of like a mix between an altar boy and an armed bodyguard, but they themselves are not allowed to pick up a weapon of any kind to remain in accordance with the Geneva Convention.

But that minor detail has never held any chaplains back from serving God and country on the front lines.


To learn more about what chaplains do for service members, watch the video below

Their main objective is to facilitate the religious and emotional needs of all troops within their "flock." Even if a chaplain was, say, a Roman Catholic priest back in the States, they accept anyone from any faith into their makeshift place of worship down range. They remain faithful to their personal denomination and preach in accordance with their own faith, but they must also learn enough about every religious belief in the formation to properly accommodate each and every troop.

This is because there is no alternative for deployed troops. Chaplains are few and far between in a given area of operation. When the worst happens and a soldier falls in combat, that Catholic chaplain needs a complete understanding of how to perform funeral rites in accordance with that troop's faith, no matter what that faith may be.

It doesn't matter which religion is on your dog tag, everyone gets the same respect.

(U.S. Army)

Given that there are so few chaplains deployed, and even fewer of any single denomination, they will travel the battlefield — sometimes an entire region command will be under the care of a single chaplain.

It'd be far too costly to send each and every troop around theater each week for a single religious service, so chaplains will come to them. It's not uncommon for a chaplain to travel to a remote location to give a sermon to just three or four troops. And since there's only one chaplain performing the ceremonies across the theater, this often means that Easter Mass won't be given exactly on Easter Sunday, but sometime around then.

"Oh father, who art in Heaven, have mercy on this F-16's enemies, for it shall not."

(U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Eugene Crist)

A chaplain and their escort never go out looking for trouble, but trouble often finds them. They're constantly on the move and, as a result, many chaplains have been tragically wounded or killed in action over the years. To date, 419 American chaplains have lost their lives while on active duty.

Captain Emil Kapaun, an Army chaplain, was said to be one of the few Catholic chaplains in his area during the Korean War. He personally drove around the countryside to administer last rites to the dead and dying, performed baptisms, heard confessions, offered Holy Communion, and conducted Mass — all from an altar that rested on the hood of his jeep. He'd often dodge bullet fire and artillery just to make it to a dying soldier in time to give them their final rites.

He was captured and taken prisoner by the Chinese during the Battle of Unsan in November, 1950. While prisoner, he often defied orders from his captors to lift the fighting spirits of the troops in the prison with him. Even while captive, he'd perform ceremonies — but was also said to have swiped coffee, tea, and life-saving medicines from guards to give to his wounded and sickly troops.

Father Emil would die in that prison, but not before giving one last Easter sunrise service in 1951. For his actions that saved the lives of countless troops in captivity, he was posthumously awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor. He became the ninth military chaplain to be bestowed the Medal of Honor, along with being named a Servant of God by Pope John Paul II.

Being named as a Servant of God by the Pope means he's on the first step to sainthood. If the church canonizes the miracles done in his name or designates him as a martyr, he could become the Patron Saint of the Soldier.

(Father Emil Kapaun celebrating Mass using the hood of a Jeep as his altar, Oct 7, 1950, Col. Raymond Skeehan)

For more in the dangerous, righteous life of an Army chaplain, be sure to catch Indivisible when it hits theaters on October 26, 2018.