This is what a modern torpedo does to a ship - We Are The Mighty
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This is what a modern torpedo does to a ship

If you have seen films from “Operation Pacific” to “Run Silent, Run Deep,” the portrayals of torpedo attacks have often involved a spread of torpedoes, hoping to get at least one hit to cripple an enemy vessel allowing the sub to close in and finish it off.


This is what a modern torpedo does to a ship
Technicians perform maintenance on a Mark 48 advanced capabilities torpedo at Keyport, Washington in 1982. (U.S. Navy photo)

For American submariners, though, their Mark 14 torpedoes were one technical failure after another.

First, they ran too deep. Then there was that magnetic exploder (which premature all too often), and then, the firing pins were a hot mess.

The problems got fixed…in September, 1943. To paraphrase what John Wayne’s Duke Gifford said in Operation Pacific, “Now, we had torpedoes.”

This is what a modern torpedo does to a ship
A torpedo hits a Mk 48 ADCAP during a SINKEX. (Youtube screenshot)

Today, our subs use the Mark 48. Unlike the Mark 14, the Mark 48 is a guided torpedo that can adjust its course to pursue a target using active and passive sonar.

The Mark 48 has reinstated that magnetic exploder in a “proximity fuse” approach (yeah, we’ll see how it does outside a test range), and it is also very capable of handling submarines and surface ships.

This is what a modern torpedo does to a ship
This is what the torpedo did to the bow of the Perry-class frigate. (Youtube screenshot)

With a top speed of at least 55 knots, the Mark 48 can catch just about any vessel if fired from a close enough range.

So, what can the torpedo do? Watch the video below to find out. The target, in this case, is an Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate – a 4,200 ton warship. By comparison, a Yugumo-class destroyer, a typical Japanese destroyer of the World War II era, displaced about 2,500 tons.

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This Green Beret will make you a mental commando

When things get squirrely, military vets have several advantages over career civilians. Vets, of course, have the benefit of combat and tactical training, but they’ve also learned to develop a formidable mental game.


Former Green Beret Mike Glover used this notion as inspiration and a jumping off point when he founded Fieldcraft Survival, his school for disaster preparedness.

With 18 years of deep operational experience, certifications out the wazoo (just check his founder’s bio), and a doomsday sense of humor that would make Mad Max proud, Glover is uniquely qualified to teach civilians to keep their heads and preserve their lives as the worst case scenario unfolds.

“At Fieldcraft, our whole basic motto is we’re teaching mindset over hard skills.”

Things, of course, got extra squirrely when Oscar Mike host Ryan Curtis dropped in for a visit.

This is what a modern torpedo does to a ship

Glover hustled Curtis right into training, first in the classroom to reinforce the importance of developing a strong mental game and then in the field, where the two ran through the O.P.S. Course, which stands for Observe, Prepare, Survive.

And just as the word “challenge” was leaving Curtis’ mouth a distant cry of distress told our heroes it was time to oil up for action.

What happened next pretty much sums up the whole series.

This is what a modern torpedo does to a ship
These are the faces of true bravery. (Go90 Oscar Mike screenshot)

Watch as Glover teaches this wannabe Martin Riggs the real meaning of the word “squirrely”, in the video embedded at the top.

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These 4 Gurkha stories will make you want to forge your own kukri knife

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  Nepal, a tiny Himalayan country country bordering India and Chinese Tibet, was one of many countries invaded by the British Empire. But the British were never able to colonize tiny Nepal. The reason the largest Empire in history couldn’t completely subdue a small mountain country? Gurkhas.

Gurkhas have long been known as the world’s fiercest and most skilled warriors, earning the respect (and often fear) of friend and foe alike. Even the British, who decided that trying to fight more Gurkhas wasn’t worth the effort, wanted the Gurkhas on their team, and Nepalese warriors have been fighting for the crown ever since.

1. Afghan Ambush

The Gurkhas have been fighting with the United Kingdom for 200 years. Today’s war in Afghanistan is no exception.

In 2008, a team of Gurkha warriors were crossing an open area when they were ambushed by Taliban fighters. One of their own Yubraj Rai, was shot and wounded. Like many armies, the Gurkhas don’t leave men behind.

In the face of overwhelming enemy fire, Captain Gajendera Angdembe, Rifleman Dhan Gurung, and Manju Gurung carried their buddy across 325 feet of open ground. One of them even used a dual wield with his rifle to return enough fire for the group to get out of there.

This is what a modern torpedo does to a ship
Rifleman Dhan Gurung returned fire using two rifles at the same time.

2. WWII Burma

In 1944, Agansing Rai, a Gurkha fighting the Japanese in Burma, came across a ridge as his platoon moved through the countryside.  The ridge was designed to be protected from any combination of armor and infantry. Leading up to the ridge was an open field and on the ridge were dug-in Japanese defenders, hiding in dense Jungle.

This is what a modern torpedo does to a ship
Agansing Rai was award the Victoria Cross for his actions and leadership that day.

Rai led his platoon against the heavy machine guns and a number of 37mm anti-tank emplacements, knocking them all out while taking some serious casualties. A ridge designed to stop tanks and infantry couldn’t stop a small Gurkha force.

3. A Commander Joins His Gurkhas

Colonel Peter Jones was fighting in Tunisia with his Gurkha battalion in 1943. As his frenzied men charged the Nazi German-manned machine guns at Enfidaville, Jones started taking out the positions with a Bren gun.

The Gurkhas charged the Nazis with their Kukri knives and fought them in hand-to-hand combat. They killed 44 Nazis, breaking the German lines and causing them to flee before advancing further.

This is what a modern torpedo does to a ship
Yeah, I’d flee too.

4.The Cold War Turns Hot in Borneo

Indonesia, supported by Communist China and the Soviet Union, was opposed to the creation of Malaysia by the Western powers, especially the United Kingdom. So Gurkhas patrolling the island jungles were ready for anything the Communists were willing to throw at them — especially the Gurkhas.

This is what a modern torpedo does to a ship
Gurkha troops patrolling the dense Borneo jungles circa 1965.

Captain Rambahadur Limbu was in enemy territory when he and his unit met an enemy advance. He repelled them using only grenades, then went back into friendly territory to alert his superiors about the advance.

With one of his friends dead and the other wounded, Limbu went into the enemy-controlled area of the battlefield, back and forth across 100 yards of no man’s land — twice — to pull out the wounded and retrieve his dead friend.

Learn more about these ferocious fighters in the video at the top.

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This is why Cossacks are Russia’s legendary fighting force

For centuries, friends and foes of Russia marveled at the fierce fighting skills of their Cossack Warriors. The Cossacks fought to defend the Russian Czar against any manner of enemies – from Ottoman Turks to Napoleon’s Grande Armée, through a World War, and even against the Bolshevik Red Army.

This is what a modern torpedo does to a ship
The last one had admittedly mixed results.

They expanded the borders of the Russian Empire, conquering Siberia and the Caucasus regions for the Czar, all the way to the Bering Sea – capturing one-sixth of the Earth’s land area. Their martial prowess was unmatched in the region for a long time and they refused to be tied to any master. Even the name “Cossack” in the Turkic languages of the time and area meant “free,” “adventurer,” or “wanderer.”

Cossack loyalty to the Russian Czar was earned over centuries of fighting to maintain that independence. Many Czars were faced with Cossack uprisings and were forced to deal with them in their own ways, from putting down the rebellion or forcibly moving the population to another area of the Russian Empire.

From a young age, Cossacks raised their children to be elite warriors and ethnically Cossack in every way possible. Training could begin in infancy and only ever stop in an actual pitched battle.

This is what a modern torpedo does to a ship
Keep your head down!

Eventually, the Russian nobility came to accept the Cossacks, endowing them with certain rights and privileges in the Empire for their continued service in defending Russia’s borders. And they earned those rights, too. After his Grand Armée was forced out of Russia, the Cossacks harassed them all the way back to France. It was the Cossacks who captured Paris and unseated the French Emperor.

When the Empire fell during World War I and the Czar abdicated, the Cossacks were divided between the Red and White factions of the Russian Civil War. They fought primarily for the White (anti-Communist) Russians, which earned them persecution when the Bolsheviks won the war and founded the Soviet Union.

The persecution got so bad, many Cossacks fought for Nazi Germany during WWII.

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Let Max the Body get you fitness-ready for your next mission

We Are The Mighty is proud to announce “Max Your Body,” a fitness series exclusively on Verizon’s Go90 platform featuring U.S Army veteran and elite personal trainer Max Philisaire showing how to train for some of the most demanding military missions. In this first episode, Max demonstrates a few exercises that help to steady your rifle to improve stability and aim.


Philisaire was born in Haiti to an Afro-Haitian father and mother. At the tender age of 8, his parents migrated to south Florida. Max is a highly certified fitness expert with over 12 years of body building experience. He is also a U.S. Military combat war veteran. While deployed overseas, he used his bodybuilding training as a survival tool to keep himself and his fellow soldiers motivated.

New episodes of “Max Your Body” will be available only on the Go90 platform. Each Tuesday for the next 10 weeks, We Are The Mighty will present a new episode of “Max Your Body,” a military-inspired workout series where Max demonstrates training methods for some of the most demanding military missions.

Download the Go90 app on your mobile device from the iTunes or Google Play store, or head over to go90.com to access We Are the Mighty’s exclusive Go90 content like “Elite Forces,” “Hurry Up and Watch,” and “Max Your Body” — and stay tuned for even more original WATM content available only on Go90.

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Watch UFC fighters get stomped by Marine Corps martial arts experts

Have you ever wondered how the toughest competitors in the UFC would stack up against the military?


Well, you can stop wondering. A YouTube video called “UFC Fighters Experience Marine Corps Martial Arts” gives a look at what happened when five fighters — Marcus Davis, Rashad Evans, Forrest Griffin, (former Marine) Brian Stann, and UFC President Dana White — made the trek to Quantico, Virginia’s Marine Corps Martial Arts Center of Excellence, better known as MACE.

After seeing a morning demonstration of tactics and techniques, the fighters attempted a training lane used to test Marines for their ability to train with knives, bayonets, and fighting sticks. The fighters lost to the Marines. Badly.

Although to be fair, even former Marine Brian Stann had some trouble standing up to his fellow Marines who were experts in the Corps’ Martial Arts program.

Watch below!

 

The athletes also attempted a Marine Corps obstacle course.

NOW: 13 photos showing the incredible determination of wounded warriors

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This retro Navy fighter footage will bring a smile to F-14 vets

This video is an ode to the F-14 Tomcat.


In 2001, as was the case six decades earlier, the United States got hit by an unprovoked and dastardly attack. The video starts with a quote from Thomas Jefferson about the tree of liberty.

Following that is a clip from the movie “Tora! Tora! Tora!” in which Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto reacts to the news that the United States Navy was hit by surprise at Pearl Harbor, complete with his famous “sleeping giant” comments.

This is what a modern torpedo does to a ship
A U.S. Navy (USN) F-14D Tomcat aircraft flies a combat mission in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM.

We then get close to ten minutes of action, much of which focuses on the F-14. Aviation historian Joe Baugher noted that the F-14 had its first operational cruise in 1974. Its primary weapon was the AIM-54 Phoenix missile – which had a range of 80 nautical miles, per Designation-Systems.net.

Baugher notes that the U.S. Navy’s Tomcat scored five air-to-air kills – two Su-22 Fitters in 1981, two MiG-23s in 1989, and a Mi-8 during Desert Storm. In a stunning decision, work on F-14D production was inexplicably halted in February, 1991 (the excuse given was that is was an “economy move”).

The F-14 soon found itself being phased out, and in 2006, the Navy retired the plane after 32 years of service. Many of the planes were scrapped to keep components from falling into Iranian hands.

Here’s the video featuring the F-14. Enjoy and give us a shout if you worked with these airframes!

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WATCH: Australian Black Hawk loses rotor blade during special operations exercise

An Australian SA70 Black Hawk helicopter clipped a rotor blade during a counterterrorism exercise in the harbor of Sydney and had to perform an emergency landing in a nearby park.

The SA70 Black Hawk chopper was taking part in a maritime counterterrorism exercise, fast-roping commandos on top of a small cruise ship in the middle of Sydney harbor. It was holding station above the ship, having just placed its commandos on the vessel when one of its main rotor blades clipped a communications mast. Upon impact, debris scattered all over the scene.

But the pilots remained calm and coolly flew the aircraft to nearby Robinson Park for an emergency landing.

The Black Hawk helicopter was from the 6th Aviation Regiment (and most probably from the unit’s 171st Aviation Squadron). The 6th Aviation Regiment is specially trained and equipped to support special operations units.

Video showing the Australian Black Hawk clipping a communications mast with one of its rotors.

Maritime counterterrorism is one of the toughest special operations mission sets. It involves numerous moving parts, from boats to helicopters, and has all the potential to go wrong. The goal is to reach the hostages and neutralize the terrorists as soon as possible. To achieve that in the fastest way possible, special operations units often use several insertion methods simultaneously. The skill required by the pilots and crews of the helicopters and boats is tremendous, especially if you consider that the target vessel might be moving and also account for the sea state.

This isn’t the first time an Australian Black Hawk supporting special operations troops is involved in an accident. In 1996, two Black Hawks supporting a Special Air Service Regiment (SASR) counterterrorism exercise in Queensland collided. As in the Sydney Harbor incident, one of the S70A Black Hawks clipped a rotor blade but this time against another Black Hawk. The first Black Hawk immediately went down, while the second crash-landed and went up in flames. In total, 18 troops (15 SASR operators and 3 aviators) were killed, making it the worse single loss of life in Australian special operations history.

This is what a modern torpedo does to a ship
The Australian Black Hawk had to make an emergency landing in a nearby park (Australian ABC).

The 6th Aviation Regiment is the Australian equivalent of the US 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment, better known as the “Night Stalkers.”

However, the Australian unit has more limited lift capabilities, currently operating only the S70A Black Hawk. In comparison, the Night Stalkers fly both the light AH/MH-6 Little Birds, MH-60 Black Hawks, and MH-47 Chinooks, thus providing light, medium, and heavy-lift options to their special operations customers.

Although the Special Air Service Regiment—the Australian military’s Tier 1 special operations unit and the equivalent of Delta Force and SEAL Team Six—used to be wholly responsible for domestic counterterrorism, that mission set is now been shared with the 2nd Commando Regiment, a unit similar to the U.S. 75th Ranger Regiment.

SASR operators man the Tactical Assault Group-West (TAG-W), which is responsible for domestic counterterrorism operations in the West part of Australia (the SASR is headquartered in Perth, West Australia). Commandos man the Tactical Assault Group-East (TAG-E), which is responsible for domestic counterterrorism operations in the East part of Australia, including the capital, Canberra.

Considering the location of the exercise, it is safe to say that these operators were from TAG-E.

This article originally appeared on Sandboxx. Follow Sandboxx on Facebook.

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‘Earning the Tab – Pt 2’ – Lisa discovers the pain and trials of Ranger School

In Part 2 of this amazing series by Army veteran Rebecca Murga, Maj. Lisa Jaster arrives at Ranger School as one of 400 candidates (including, for the first time, 19 women) who are part of Class 06-15. Jaster quickly discovers the physical pain and mental anguish is going to push her past her limits. The average age of her Ranger School classmates is 23; she is 37.


Although hungry and sleep-deprived, Jaster realizes that she is changing male soldier’s attitudes toward females by her mere presence not to mention her effort.

“During the road march I came in in the first quarter of the company,” she recounts. “Some guy – I never saw his face – just said to me, ‘You killed me. I ran the whole thing because every time I looked up you were right behind me, and I couldn’t let you finish before me.’ Then he said to me, ‘I’m sorry. For everything you never heard me say, I’m sorry. And I’ve changed.'”

That impact keeps Jaster going even though she is forced to “recycle” Ranger School, which means she has to start all over again if she wants to earn her tab. Her challenges have just begun . . .

Look for Part 3 of ‘Earning the Tab’ at WATM next week.

Watch ‘Earning the Tab – Pt. 1’ here.