Articles

Navy SEAL: Here's how to stay fit when you have no time to workout

In the mid-90's, Randy Hetrick was a Navy SEAL deployed on a counter-piracy mission in southeast Asia, holed up in a warehouse, trying to figure out how to stay in the kind of shape necessary to quickly scale the side of a freighter while wearing 75 pounds of gear. He had accidentally deployed with his jujitsu belt, which he combined with some spare webbing from parachute harnesses to DIY a "Cro-Magnon" version of what became the TRX suspension training system. Today, it's a wildly popular piece of exercise equipment based on the principles of bodyweight resistance.


That's a great invention story; it's also directly applicable to a new dad, which Hetrick has been, twice. New dads have to figure out how to maintain some semblance of physical fitness despite a life of chaos. We asked Hetrick how to use what he's learned when the "warehouse" is your house and the blood thirsty pirate is your sleep-hating little kid.

The Schedule

Thirty-to-45 minutes spread out over the course of a day is more than enough time to kick your own ass. Hetrick suggests carving out 3 10-to-15 minute blocks a day. "There are seasons in life," he says. "Be ok saying, 'I don't have time for an hour workout, so I'll just do 10 or 20 minutes."

Workouts 1 & 3: Perform these at home and focus on the upper body, lower body and core. That's easy to do, since Hetrick only recommends bodyweight exercises (as opposed to weights), which naturally overlap multiple muscles and joints into single exercises. He also recommends time-based, as opposed to rep-based, sets: one minute of work with 30 seconds of recovery. Since you're already too tired to do the math: that's about 6 exercise for a 10-minute workout and 10 for a 15-minute one.

Workout 2: You can do this one at work and it doesn't require sweating profusely and then going about your day like some gross re-enactment of 4th Grade gym class. Just spend these 10-15 minutes doing "mobility movements" (that's "stretching" to you) and none of your co-workers will know you're halfway through a Navy SEAL's daily workout.

The Exercises

"It's what you do in life," says Hetrick of bodyweight exercising. "You're lunging, you're squatting, you're bending, reaching and twisting." It's also highly efficient, since it requires more oxygen, pumps more blood and burns more calories than single muscle weight work outs. It turns out, you (particularly you with some very portable TRX straps) are your own best piece of gym equipment.

Exercises Without TRX

Exercises With TRX

With a suspension training system like TRX, it's easier to go from movement to movement and execute actions that integrate multiple joints and muscles at once. When you buy the system, you get access to various workout tools, but here are a few of Hetrick's favorites:

  • Squat rows integrate more muscles into the repetition.
  • Atomic pushup work arms and back while burning the crap out of your core.
  • Pledge curls, which use both arms simultaneously across the body — one to the opposite shoulder and the other to the opposite armpit, switching on each rep.

Whether your use TRX or not, the important thing to remember is that keeping your jiggly bundle of joy from turning you into a sad tub of goo doesn't require a lot of stuff.

Mobility Movements

Most men — and particularly new fathers — need help opening the hips and back. Men's hips are naturally tight (since they don't push little people through them), and most fathers' backs are a wreck due to the aforementioned jiggly bundle of joy being unable to pick itself up off the ground. With these stretches, move into tension for 30 seconds, then ease off for 10 seconds and give each movement around 2 minutes.

  • Hip hinge: Spread your feet, bend at the waist, and let gravity stretch your hamstrings and decompress your spine.
  • Seated hamstring: Legs apart, lean forward.
  • Figure four stretch: Try this one laying down and then try it standing.
  • Cobra pose: The basic building block of hot yoga mom workouts is great for opening shoulders and abs.

The Running Alternative

As a SEAL, Hetrick used to run for miles with a 75-pound backpack. So, lugging a kid in a baby carrier gives him happy little flashbacks. "The kid instantly falls asleep, you've got a load hanging off you, and can go off for as brisk a walk as you want. Anyone who tries power walking with a [kid] quickly discovers it's just as taxing as jogging with no load."

And even though Hetrick can't guarantee your kid will actually fall asleep in the carrier (as opposed to, say, screaming hysterically from the moment you put them in one), his main point is that exercising — even with new kids — is within your grasp. "It can be an opportunity to re-prioritize and create a new routine. Replace the 30 minutes of happy hour time with 10 minutes of suspension training or other exercise, and you'll be better for it," he says.

After all, "You can't do happy hour anymore, anyway."

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This article originally appeared at Fatherly. Copyright 2015. Like Fatherly on Facebook.

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