Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic - We Are The Mighty
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Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic


There are plenty of terrible things to say about Adolf Hitler, and here’s one more: His top-down leadership style really didn’t help his generals.

Germany had rolled over a number of European countries in late 1939 and by June 1940, its soldiers were standing in the streets of Paris. But that wasn’t enough for Hitler, who had his eye on London. In Führer Directive 16 of July 16, 1940, Hitler ordered his generals to work on a “surprise crossing” on the English Channel which he wanted to call Sea Lion.

“The aim of this operation will be to eliminate the English homeland as a base for the prosecution of the war against Germany and, if necessary, to occupy it completely,” he wrote.

But there was a big problem: His generals thought it was ridiculous. According to a study by a German operations officer in 1939, in order for it to be successful, the Germans needed to completely eliminate the Royal Air Force, all its Navy units on the coast, kill most of its submarines, and seal off the landing and approach areas from British troops.

Not exactly the easiest of tasks.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
How Hitler expected an invasion of England to go.

Then there were his top military leaders. In response to a soliciation for input from the German Army, the head of Germany’s Air Force Herman Göring responded with just a single page outright rejecting such an idea: “It could only be the final act of an already victorious war against Britain as otherwise the preconditions for success of a combined operation would not be met.”

The Navy responded similarly at the time. But it was in even worse shape after an invasion of Norway in 1940, and Admiral Eric Raeder knew he didn’t have nearly enough ships to take on Britain. But — surprise, surprise — Hitler didn’t care.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic

In a review of the book “Operation Sea Lion” by Leo McKinstry, NPR writes:

But Hitler’s hubris and poor strategic thinking ensured this never happened. McKinstry contends that three major mistakes cost Hitler dearly: his underestimation of Britain’s naval power; his lack of understanding of the British political system; and his failure to recognize that a team of intelligence operators at Bletchley Park were decoding key information about the Luftwaffe’s plans for aerial bombings.

Though a plan to invade the British mainland was finalized by August 1940, it never came to pass. German infantry began practicing beach landings while the first step of the plan — beat the Air Force — was tried. It was the three month “Battle of Britain” and it failed miserably for Germany.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Don’t mess with Essex.

Instead of Germany achieving air superiority in preparation for invasion, the Brits instead had a decisive victory that became a turning point in the war.

“The German Navy had lost a lot of destroyers by 1940 and the reality is that, if the invaders had made the crossing, they would have been annihilated by the Royal Navy,” Ian Kikuchi, a historian in London, told the Independent. “They were planning to make the journey in river barges.”

After the failure of the Battle of Britain, Hitler decided in September to postpone the operation. Then the plans were completely scrapped after Germany invaded Russia in 1941.

NOW: 6 of the wildest top secret spy missions of World War II

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Here’s how the Cactus Air Force made all the difference at Guadalcanal

The fight for Guadalcanal was a brutal first step in driving back the Japanese in the Pacific. The main objective for the campaign was to deny them use of the Solomon Islands. They threatened U.S. supply lines to Australia and the U.S. wanted to use the islands as a starting point for the larger war in the Pacific. The battle was fought on land, at sea, and in the air and involved every branch of the U.S. military. The aerial battle was fought mostly by the “Cactus Air Force” flying out of Henderson Field.


Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Cactus Air Force Aircrew Roster Meeting

The Cactus Air Force was a conglomeration of Marine, Navy, and Army Air Corps assets operating in some of the worst conditions imaginable. Although the Marines jokingly referred to the campaign as ‘Operation Shoestring’ because of the lack of the supplies, the Cactus Air Force was actually named after the codename for Guadalcanal.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Henderson Field getting hit by Japanese aerial attacks.

The 1st Marine Division attacked the Solomon Islands on the night of August 6th and morning of August 7, 1942 with the bulk of the division landing unopposed on Guadalcanal. The Marines captured the airfield on August 8th and immediately set to work completing the airstrip. The airfield was ready for use by August 18, and the first two Marine squadrons, one of F4F Hellcats and one of SBD Dauntless dive bombers, arrived on the 20th to begin combat operations the next day.

Two days later the Marine aviators were joined by five U.S. Army Air Force P-39 Airacobras. On August 24, eleven more Dauntless dive bombers landed at Henderson Field after being unable to return to the USS Enterprise due to damage it received during the Battle of the Eastern Solomons. By the end of August, another Marine fighter squadron and another dive bomber squadron had also arrived on the island.

This assortment of men and planes were the beginning of the Cactus Air Force, and they were in for a hell of a time.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic

At the time of the Guadalcanal campaign, the Japanese Empire was at its peak and, aside from being denied at the Battles of Coral Sea and Midway, had yet to lose any territory they gained and were loath to do so. As such, the American airfield and its inhabitants were under near constant bombardment and attack. The Imperial Japanese Navy would shell Henderson Field from the sea while the Japanese Air Force sent daily bombing missions against the Americans. The constant bombardment continually damaged the runway, destroyed valuable aircraft, and inflicted numerous casualties.

To make matters worse, the island was not yet secure and the Japanese were continually attacking the perimeter attempting to dislodge the Americans from Guadalcanal. The 1st Marine Division reinforced by the 164th Infantry Regiment of the newly formed Americal Division held the line against Japanese assaults. During the Battle of Henderson Field, 1st Battalion, 7th Marines held out against some of the worst attacks, and it was during this action John Basilone earned the Medal of Honor and Lt. Col. Chesty Puller earned his third Navy Cross.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic

If the constant attacks on Henderson Field wasn’t bad enough, the living conditions were terrible as well. When the Americans captured the airfield it was far from complete and had no permanent living quarters. The pilots and mechanics were housed in mud-floored tents in a flooded coconut grove they referred to as “Mosquito Grove.” The squalid living conditions led to many diseases, including malaria, dysentery, dengue fever, and fungal infections.

The local climate contributed to the misery too. In the heat, black volcanic dust covered everything and when it rained the ground turned into a quagmire. Major Marion Carl, a Marine aviator stationed at Henderson Field, commented that it was “the only place on Earth where you could stand up to your knees in mud and still get dust in your eyes.”

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic

Just surviving at Henderson Field was difficult enough, but the Marines, sailors, and soldiers still had to fly and fight. The dust fouled the engines of the planes, the mud kept them from moving, and the Japanese bombardment destroyed the planes and the runway. The runway was in such poor condition in the early stages of the battle that nearly as many Cactus Air Force planes were damaged just using it as they were in fighting against the Japanese. There were also no facilities for the aircraft: no hangers, no fuel trucks, and no bomb hoists. Damaged aircraft were cannibalized where they stood for their spare parts. Bombs had to be loaded by hand as did the fuel. Without fuel trucks the only way to fuel the planes was to hand pump it out of 55 gallon drums.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic

Despite all of these challenges, the Cactus Air Force fought tenaciously and was successful in helping the U.S. achieve victory. Six different airmen were awarded the Medal of Honor for their actions while serving with the Cactus Air Force. An even greater number of pilots became aces during the campaign. Though total victories for the Cactus Air Force cannot be confirmed for the six months they were involved in combat, they claimed over 250 aerial victories. The dive and torpedo bombers from Henderson Field sank seventeen large Japanese naval vessels and damaged another eighteen. Most importantly, they sank transport ships that were attempting to deliver supplies and reinforcements to the Japanese on the island. These victories came at the price of 94 pilots killed or missing and a further 177 wounded or evacuated due to illness plus numerous ground crew killed or wounded. After the Guadalcanal campaign, the Cactus Air Force was consolidated with other allied air units under Aircraft, Solomons (or AirSols) which continued to support Allied operations in the Solomon Islands and Southern Pacific.

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Hurricane Matthew unearths Civil War-era cannonballs

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Cannonballs from the Civil War unearthed on a South Carolina beach by the storm surge of Hurricane Matthew. (Photo: ABC News)


Hurricane Matthew, in addition to all the damage caused by high winds and flooding, also unearthed a number of old cannon rounds from the Civil War.

Civil War-era rounds have been discovered across the country, including a few in Washington state in 2015. Also that year, tourists at the Manassas Battlefield Park brought a shell that they had found to the visitor’s center. That prompted an evacuation until the round was confirmed to be inert. In 2013, a Confederate soldier’s souvenir from the Second Battle of Manassas caused kerfluffle near Mountain Home Air Force Base.

Unexploded ordnance is one of the realities from after any major war. In fact, one shouldn’t be surprised. In World War II, Allied bombers dropped over 1.4 million tons of bombs – the equivalent of 5.6 million Mk 82 500-pounders.

With those sort of numbers, it is easy to imagine that some of the bombs didn’t explode when they hit. And the Allies weren’t the only ones who dropped bombs in that war. As a result, random discoveries of unexploded ordnance (abbreviated in military circles as “UXO”) have been common in Europe. In fact, the ordnance has been traced to other wars as well. In France, farmers have come across World War I ordnance while plowing their fields, including some that contained poison gas.

In the case of South Carolina, these cannonballs were detonated in place by EOD after the tide receded. Nobody got hurt, and there was no damage. Residents in the area only heard the controlled detonation. The first cannonballs of the Civil War were fired in nearby Fort Sumter on April 12, 1861.

ABC News reports that Hurricane Matthew brought a nearly 6-foot storm surge and torrential rain that totaled 14 inches in spots of South Carolina, and is being blamed for two deaths there and at least 21 across four southeastern states.

When it comes to UXO, the best advice is not to touch it. Get a safe distance away, then call 911. Playing around with UXO, no matter how “safe” it might appear to be, is a good way to get a Darwin Award.

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Of course, ‘Happy Hour’ started with bored sailors

Shortly before the outbreak of World War I, U.S. troops occupied the Mexican port at Veracruz. The occupation came at a cost to both sides: the Americans lost 20 sailors over the course of killing 150 Mexicans.


The violence leveled off after a few weeks, and life in the city became relatively routine. War correspondents traveling with the U.S. Atlantic Fleet became bored with the calm and started to focus on the troops’ everyday life in the hopes that that might yield something their readership would respond to. One of these headlines was “The ‘Happy Hour’ Aboard Ship Makes Tars Contented.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic

According to the Early Sports Pop Culture History Blog, one well-meaning Navy officer, Lieutenant Jonas Ingram, originated the practice of “Happy Hour” aboard his ship, the USS Arkansas. Since the Arkansas was the flagship of Admiral Charles Badger, the commander of the Atlantic Fleet, officers encouraged its spread to the other ships of the fleet and into the ships of the wider U.S. Navy. The practice would carry on throughout the coming world wars.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Admiral Badger doesn’t give a sh*t.

The Arkansas‘ Happy Hours included athletic competitions (usually boxing), dancing, and a band while at sea. The enlisted men on board couldn’t drink, as per Navy regulations since 1899 (though officers could). In port, dancing girls from local bars were the center of the fun. The sailors ashore had easy access to liquor. Navy regulations at the time only prohibited the sale or issue of booze aboard ship, not the consumption on land.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic

When sailors and soldiers returned home from the Great War, they introduced the idea of “Happy Hour” into the American vernacular. The idea of “happy hour” as we know it came from the use of the term in a “Saturday Evening Post” article in 1959, entitled The Men Who Chase Missiles. The article was about U.S. Air Force airmen working at remote island outposts in the Caribbean and how they saved money by not having anywhere to spend it… unless they spent it all at the local watering hole.

“Except for those who spend too much during “happy hour” at the bar – and there are few of these – the money mounts up fast.”

The USS Arkansas, once a state-of-the-art modern battleship, found itself obsolete at the end of World War II and did its country one last service – this time in a more of an academic research role.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic

 

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Watch this Marine describe his personal battle at Tarawa

Louis Mamula was one of the Marines assigned to take Betio Island of the Tarawa Atoll in the Pacific.


What was supposed to be a tough but short battle where the Marines would quickly win became some of the bloodiest 76 hours in American history as obstacles on the approach and determined Japanese defenders made the Marines bleed for every bit of sand.

The idea behind capturing Betio Island in the Tarawa Atoll was that it would serve as the opening blow in a new front across the Japanese and give the Navy and Marine Corps a corridor through the Central Pacific to Japan.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Casualties and destruction after the battle for the Tarawa Atoll. (U.S. Navy)

But the landings ran into trouble as coral reefs and man-made obstacles in the water proved more troublesome than originally expected. Troops headed to the beaches sometimes had to get out of their amphibious vehicles and wade through chest-deep water to the beaches under fire.

On land, the situation wasn’t much better. The relatively flat island gave defensive machine gun positions wide fields of fire and favored the defender.

Mamula landed in this chaos and pushed forward with the other Marines of the 2nd Marine Division. In the video below, he discusses what it took to capture the island so well defended that the Japanese boasted, “a million Americans could not take Tarawa in 100 years!”

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12-year-old becomes the youngest EOD Marine

Nathan Aldaco is twelve years old and suffers from hypoplastic left heart syndrome, a rare defect. Because his biggest wish in life is to become a United States Marine, the Marines from the 7th Engineer Support Battalion at Camp Pendleton were happy to oblige him.


Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Nathan Aldaco, a 12 year-old boy with hypoplastic left heart syndrome, walks with Marines to a demolition site during a Make-A-Wish event supported by 7th Engineer Support Battalion, 1st Marine Logistics Group, aboard Camp Pendleton, Calif. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Laura Gauna)

“It’s a true honor to do this for Nathan,” said 1st Lt. Ernesto Gaudio, 2nd platoon commander, Bravo Company, 7th ESB, 1st MLG. “We wanted to make him feel like he was a part of the Marine family. We are in service to the United States of America and Nathan is a citizen of the United States. We were just making his wish come true.”

The Marines decked Aldaco in his own MARPAT Marine Corps Combat Utility Uniform and gave his family a tour of the explosives ordnance disposal site at Pendleton. He was taken through a demolition range in a Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicle. The team demonstrated their EOD robots and then detonated TNT, C4, dynamite, and blasting caps. The youngest Marine even shared MREs with his fellow Marines while out in the field.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Nathan Aldaco, a 12 year-old boy with hypoplastic left heart syndrome, looks out of a bunker during a Make-A-Wish event supported by 7th Engineer Support Battalion, 1st Marine Logistics Group, aboard Camp Pendleton, Calif. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Laura Gauna)

“The bombs were cool,”  Aldaco said in an interview with the Marines’ official website. “I like working with robots. It was fun controlling them and picking stuff up with them.”

He was awarded the Master EOD badge in an official ceremony by Col. Jaime O. Collazo. It is the highest badge an EOD Marine can receive. Aldaco saluted the colonel before marching off.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Nathan Aldaco, a 12 year-old boy with hypoplastic left heart syndrome, and his family, pose for a picture with Explosive Ordnance Disposal Marines during a Make-A-Wish event. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Laura Gauna)

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Watch a missile ricochet off a Syrian rebel tank

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
The moment before impact. Saif Al Sham Brigades capture via YouTube


A dramatic video released by the Saif Al Sham Brigades fighting in southern Syria shows an Islamic State guided missile ricocheting off a T-55 tank with a hard metallic smack.

It was close … seriously close. For whatever reason — a dud or a bad shot — the ISIS missile failed to explode. Had it, the blast could have blown up the tank, killed the crew and the rebel filming the incident. The camera operator, stunned by the blast, captures the tank backing off. The T-55 later returns and fires its cannon in a “shoot and scoot” maneuver.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=68s-QtYNnNw

The tank — almost certainly captured from the Syrian army — had no discernible “active protection” systems which can scramble a missile’s guidance systems. The ISIS missile was almost certainly captured … but the origin is unknown.

The Saif Al Sham Brigades is a Free Syrian Army group active in southern Syria and has appeared on lists of CIA-vetted rebel factions. Saif Al Sham counts itself as part of the Southern Front coalition of rebel groups, but this is a loosely-knit organization at the best of times.

The Front has also received support from Turkey, Qatar and Saudi Arabia. It’s unclear if Saif Al Sham specifically has received any funding or weapons from any of these nations.

What the video does demonstrate is the intense pressure anti-tank guided missiles can put on armed combatants in the Syrian civil war. Despite failing to knock out the tank, which was quickly back in action, the close call was enough for the rebels to back up — fast.

Tank-killing missiles have proliferated so much, they’ve effectively halted armored breakthroughs and contributed to a five-year-old stalemate.

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The 5 worst modern battles to fight as a foot soldier

Let’s be clear — all battles suck for a foot soldier, even the smaller ones. But there were some in recent times that sucked more than others for the lowly grunt, with body counts piling up, bad commanders and leadership with a total lack of respect for the lives of their men.


Here is a partial list of five of the worst modern battles to be a bottom-of-the-barrel foot soldier.

5. The Battle of Kiev, 1941

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Soviet troops on the move to Kiev. (Photo: Wikimedia Commons)

The Battle of Kiev lasted from August 23 – Sept. 26, 1941. The German army, led by Fedor von Bock, Gerd von Rundstedt, and the famed Heinz Guderian, continued their spearhead towards Moscow but Hitler reconsidered.

Instead, he ordered Bock, von Rundstedt, and Guderian to focus their attack on the city of Kiev. The total amount of German forces heading towards Kiev numbered a little over 500,000. The reason for this was that Kiev was third largest city with a large concentration of Soviet forces with likely more than 627,000 Red Army troops facing the German onslaught.

How bad was it? In order to crush the Soviets in Kiev, the Germans were forced to systematically reduce the pockets of resistance. In other words, the Germans had to work at making each line (pockets of resistance) buckle and break.

Because of this, the fighting was unsurprisingly up close and personal. The total number of dead were 127,000 Germans and 700,544 Soviets — that’s over 800,000 killed in the battle for Kiev.

4. The Battle of Verdun, 1916

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
French troops moving through the trenches during the Battle of Verdun. (Photo: Wikimedia Commons)

The Battle of Verdun lasted from Feb. 21 – Dec. 18, 1916, between the armies of France and the German Empire. Located in northeastern France, when the battle of Verdun kicked off, 30,000 French soldiers faced 130,000 German soldiers. Seeing that 30,000 troops were not enough, the French bolstered their forces to a staggering 1.1 million men. The Germans countered this by delivering 1.25 million troops.

The horrors of such a battle need little explanation. All one has to do is look at the photos of the battle site. World War I was a war in which the technology outpaced the tactics and strategies. Because of this, war came to a near standstill as men were mowed down by machine guns and blown to pieces by artillery fire on a daily basis.

If that wasn’t enough, living in the trenches was another misery all its own. Here’s a testimony.

A German soldier writes to his parents:

An awful word, Verdun. Numerous people, still young and filled with hope, had to lay down their lives here – their mortal remains decomposing somewhere, in between trenches, in mass graves, at cemeteries…

In total, the French would lose upwards of 500,000 troops while the Germans lost in some estimates more than 400,000 — nearly 1 million killed on both sides.

3. The Siege of Leningrad, 1941-1944

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Red Army troops fighting on the outskirts of Leningrad. (Photo: Wikimedia Commons)

The siege of Leningrad lasted from Sept. 8 1941 – Jan. 27, 1944. The German army surrounded the city with 725,000 troops and began an on-and-off bombardment and assault of the city which was defended by 930,000 Soviet soldiers.

While the Germans made little advancement into the city, mainly controlling the outskirts, they were effective in starving the city to near death.

While war is indeed hell, the Germans suffered from the typical day-to-day engagements as did the Soviet soldiers. However, the people of the city suffered the worst. Due to the limited amount of supplies, many people ate whatever they could get their hands on, even people.

Once the siege lifted, the Germans suffered 579,985 casualties while the Soviets lost 642,000 during the siege and another 400,000 at evacuations.

2. The Battle of Stalingrad, 1942-1943

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
A German soldier fights during the battle of Stalingrad. (Photo: Wikimedia Commons)

The battle of Stalingrad lasted from August 23, 1942 – Feb. 2, 1943. Initially, the Germans besiege the city with 270,000 troops. But by the time the siege was lifted, the Germans army had swelled to 1,040,000 men.

The Soviets at first only had 187,000 personnel to defend the city, but by the time of the counteroffensive, more than 1.1 million troops were on the move.

The horrors of Stalingrad were an outgrowth of the hellish street-to-street and building-to-building fighting. Not to mention the many horrors both sides witnessed and committed.

Red Army Maj. Anatloy Zoldatov, recalled:

The filth and human excrement and who knows what else was piled up waist-high. It stank beyond belief. There were two toilets and signs above them both that read: No Russians allowed.

In total, the Germans would lose 734,000 killed, wounded and missing, while the Russians lost 478,741 killed and missing and another 650,878 wounded or sick.

1. The Battle of Berlin, 1945

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
German troops teach Berliners to use an anti-tank grenade before the battle of Berlin. (Photo: Wikimedia Commons)

The battle of Berlin ran from April 16 – May 2, 1945. The Germans had only 766,750 soldiers on hand to defend the city against 2.5 million Soviet soldiers. The result was a decisive Soviet victory that would lead to Germany’s surrender on May 7, 1945.

As for the horrors of the battle, many German citizens — including children — were forced to defend the city. Of course, this was the norm when the situation grows dire.

Like Stalingrad, the fighting in Berlin would be from street-to-street and building-to-building. However, the German army, like its people, were depleted from years of war and had 2.5 million angry Soviets kicking their door in.

Once Berlin was theirs, the pillaging began. In total, the Germany army lost 92,000–100,000 troops while the Soviets lost 81,116.

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These war movie characters describe your NFL team’s performance during the regular season

The regular NFL season is over now. Twelve teams are preparing for the postseason while twenty more are going back to the drawing board.


Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
It’s unfair to make a Cleveland Browns joke here. Or anywhere, really.

For most of our teams, the season will not end well.  For some of us, our teams will be merely disappointing. Some will go down in flames. Others may even inexplicably snatch defeat from the jaws of victory.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic

The NFL has a lot in common with the military. Like a battle, football requires discipline, endurance, and teamwork. Each team has its own culture, fan base, trials, and tribulations. To celebrate the crowning glory of what is the most American of sports, we decided to make sense of the 2015-2016 season’s ups and downs by comparing the teams to military film and television characters.

Arizona Cardinals – Lt. Dan Taylor, Forrest Gump

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic

The Cardinals are one of the NFL’s longest continual franchises who still don’t have a Super Bowl win. It’s like Lt. Dan’s family tradition of fighting in every major war: none of his ancestors lived long enough to see the big win. Maybe this time will be different?

Atlanta Falcons – Anthony “Swoff” Swofford, Jarhead

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic

Everything started off so promising. A 5-0 start, the best since 2012.  But it never really went anywhere. Like Swoff going through hell to become an elite Marine: When it came down to it, it was all for naught. Swoff never got to fire his rifle. The Falcons lost 8 of their last 11 games. Just… disappointing. But like the Marines returning to Iraq in 2003, there’s always next year.

Baltimore Ravens – Sgt. Barnes, Platoon

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic

This unit lost man after man until everyone watching was filled with dread and a sense of pathos soured their crab cakes. After so many player losses went down, everything else went downhill too. Unit cohesion became a disaster and no one outside of Maryland shed a tear when they died. The Ravens are also notoriously paranoid.

Buffalo Bills –  Chief Casey Ryback, Under Siege

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic

If a team were represented by their fans at home games, the Bills would be Jeff Portnoy from Tropic Thunder. Luckily (and surprisingly) the Bills 8-8 season was much better than anyone expected, thanks in no small part to ex-Flacco backup Tyrod Taylor. Taylor’s performance can be likened to the ship’s cook of the USS Missouri, who was actually a Navy SEAL.

Carolina Panthers – Sgt. Maj. Basil Plumley, We Were Soldiers

The Panthers had the second oldest average age of any team in the NFL, edged only by the Colts. Unlike the Colts’ geriatric gameplay, the Panthers’ translated into solid veteran status, going 15-1 and earning the #1 seed in the playoffs. No one is looking forward to running into Carolina in the postseason, nor should they be.

Chicago Bears – Pvt. Mellish, Saving Private Ryan

I’m only guessing here, but I bet this scene perfectly illustrates the experience of being a Bears fan and/or player throughout the 2015 season.

Cincinnati Bengals – Sgt. Nicholas Brody, Homeland

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic

Are you really good? Is everything what it appears to be? It’s been so long. Can we tell for certain? There’s only one thing Cincinnati fans know for certain: No one trusts you. Also: Ginger. Also: Nice reg haircut.

Cleveland Browns – The Cast of Tropic Thunder, Tropic Thunder

Other teams have had worse records, other teams have their messes, but the Browns keep doing the same thing year after year: new coach, new QB, new outlook, same outcome. It’s like the Browns aren’t even an NFL team anymore. They’re more of a parody of football, skewering the entire culture of the NFL and its fandom. Unlike Tropic Thunder, there’s no happy ending.

Dallas Cowboys – PFC William Hudson, Aliens

A once-awesome team whose season started off with solid wins fell apart at the first sign of despair. And “despair” was the word of the season. Quarterback after quarterback would come to Dallas and meet their fate while the team struggled to keep it together long enough to pull in four total wins.

Denver Broncos – John Rambo, First Blood

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic

The Broncos were quietly awesome in 2015. Not a lot of flair, the Broncos just went about their business trying to get to a Super Bowl. They weren’t amazing on offense for much of the season but like Rambo taking on some know-nothing cops in the woods, the defense demolished offenses one-by-one, losing only four games with three of those by one score or less.

Detroit Lions – Forrest Gump, Forrest Gump

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic

No one really dislikes the Lions. We don’t really understand them either. For many of us, they’re like a family member, in that we see them once in a while and they always show up to Thanksgiving. They definitely aren’t stupid and they show us all the time the amazing things they’re capable of doing. And just like Forrest Gump, they aren’t winning a Super Bowl anytime soon.

Green Bay Packers – Capt. Jimmy Wilder, Independence Day

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic

Jimmy had confident leadership with an obvious record of success. Unfortunately, he just didn’t have what it takes to survive til the end. The Packers are much the same way. They have a chance to be Capt. Hiller if they can just keep their mask on, but they’re looking at a formidable wall of alien spaceship shaped like a giant Carolina Panther.

Houston Texans – Jean Rasczak, Starship Troopers

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic

Maybe it’s just J.J. Watt, but the Texans always seem angry to me. Like if a Texan doesn’t play hard enough, Watt will hurt them himself. This might explain all their QB injuries.

Indianapolis Colts – Pvt. James Ryan, the beginning end of Saving Private Ryan

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic

As of September’s cut down day, the Indianapolis Colts were the oldest team in the NFL, meaning oldest average age of its players, (and it’s not just because of Adam Vinatieri, age 43). And they played like it at times, going 8-8. Those eight wins were against teams with a losing record and within one score against teams with a winning record. Extra points awarded for never giving up.

Jacksonville Jaguars –  Capt. James T. Kirk, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan

Blame this on ownership. When owners change, the team should change a bit. Owner Shahid Khan has had years to get something going for the people of Jacksonville, who paid $63 million in upgrades for the stadium in 2013 only to receive a Jacksonville team with a record of 3-13. Everyone should be screaming about this.

Kansas City Chiefs – John Rambo, Rambo III 

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic

They seemed reluctant at first but around week seven the Chiefs decided they had enough. With the gusto of Rambo going to rescue Col. Trautman, they demolished the perennial favorites Broncos and Steelers and trounced a resurgent Bills. This team who started 1-5 very nearly won the conference championship.

Miami Dolphins – Robert E. Lee, Gettysburg

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic

Because no one lives in the past like the Miami Dolphins.

Minnesota Vikings – Sgt. 1st Class Sanderson, Black Hawk Down

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic

Just as skilled and capable as Norm “Hoot” Hooten, but not nearly as interesting. The Vikings were able to beat the Chiefs once this season, but really spent Sundays taking down Chargers, Lions, and Bears most of the time. Still a winner, but not a Hoot.

New England Patriots – Chris Kyle, American Sniper

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic

Some people love you, some people hate you. None of that matters, because you’re among the best there is whether they like you or not.

New Orleans Saints – The entire cast of The Alamo

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic

It turns out defense is pretty important. No one proves that more than the Saints.

New York Giants – Col. Kurtz, Apocalypse Now

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic

Watching the Giants’ 2015 season was like watching a once-formidable force just begging to be put out of its misery.

New York Jets – Capt. Virgil Hilts, The Great Escape

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic

Being the only team with a winning record to not make the playoffs is like escaping from a Nazi prison camp on a motorcycle, only to be captured on the Swiss border. They were so close, only to be sent back to the cooler.

Oakland Raiders – Maximus Decimus Meridius, Gladiator

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic

An old man dies and now once great team is surrounded by people rejected by the everyone else and all they can think about is moving to the Coliseum.

Philadelphia Eagles – Capt. Dave “Captain America” McGraw, Generation Kill

No team’s on- and off-field behavior draws more head shaking than Philadelphia.

Pittsburgh Steelers – Animal Mother, Full Metal Jacket

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic

Full of guts, but no ideals: The Steelers snuck into the playoffs after a lucky Jets loss gave them the edge. You have to respect Animal Mother, though. He’s there because he knows how to do what he’s been trained to do and he’s good at it. Just like Pittsburgh.

St. Louis Rams – Nick, The Deer Hunter

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic

St. Louis fans have seen seasons like this so often, they must be mentally broken by now. Every year, the talk of the Rams moving to LA has to wear on both the fans and the team. If they don’t move this year, spin the barrel for another 7-9 season and see what happens when you pull the trigger.

San Diego Chargers – Capt. Herbert Sobel, Band of Brothers

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic

It’s not that the Chargers lack the will to succeed. It’s just that they lack the skill to succeed. So they’ll be moved somewhere which might be a better fit. Currahee!

San Francisco 49ers – Sgt. Elias, Platoon

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic

The days of the 49ers being a “nice” team are over, and probably have been for a long time. Like the death of everything Sgt. Elias represented in Platoon, we can probably count on the 49ers becoming more and more desperate to do whatever it takes to win as time goes on.

Seattle Seahawks – Maverick, Top Gun

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic

Seattle is eminently likable despite a few personality flaws, flaws which led the them through the team’s ups and downs this season. Despite those few losses, the Seahawks are still among the best there is.

Tampa Bay Buccaneers – Pvt. Timothy Upham, Saving Private Ryan

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic

The ultimate letdown. Sure, they have a much-talked-about leader but they also have all the skills they don’t need. When the time came to do or die, Upham didn’t even have the nerve to die. There’s always next year, but some of the guys on their roster won’t be around for it. Whose fault is that?

Tennessee Titans- PFC Blackburn, Black Hawk Down

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic

You fell out of a helicopter before the fighting even started and you stayed down the whole time. You brought a lot of people down with you. A new QB made everyone feel like the Titans were a new, fresh team. There was hope. Then it all became a mess. Also, all the football references in Black Hawk Down are great reminders of the Titans’ most famous one yard line play.

Washington Redskins – The 54th Massachusetts Infantry, Glory

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic

No one expected much from Washington this year. Despite every bad thing said about them, the Voldemorts of the NFL showed up to play every game of the season, finishing 9-7 and winning the NFC East. In their next battle, they’ll be mercilessly thrown at a formidable opponent and their leader will probably be taken down with them.

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Incredible photos from the US Army’s massive European airborne training operation

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
An Italian paratrooper prepares for a static line jump in a US Air Force C-130J during exercise Swift Response 16. | Staff Sgt. DeAndre Curtiss/US Air Force


Staging aircraft carriers offshore or using drones from far away can be great assets in modern warfare. However, sometimes it’s necessary to go back to the basics when responding to a global crisis.

Exercise Swift Response 16, a month-long operation led by US forces, was conducted to keep up with traditional and newer methods of combat. Over 5,000 troops from nations such as France, Germany, Great Britain, and Italy took part in this massive airborne exercise to conduct a rapid-response, joint forcible-entry scenario. While working with their European allies, US forces also participated in notable scenarios, such as staging a base within 18 hours of notification.

Here are several pictures of the multinational airborne exercise:

US Army and Italian paratroopers board a US Air Force C-130J Hercules during exercise Swift Response 16, at Ramstein Air Base, Germany.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Staff Sgt. DeAndre Curtiss/US Air Force

A C-130J Super Hercules aircraft from Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, takes off for Germany within several hours’ worth of notice.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Master Sgt. Joseph Swafford/US Air Force

British paratroopers conduct a static-line jump.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Staff Sgt. DeAndre Curtiss/US Air Force

Dutch Army paratroopers jump into Bunker Drop Zone at Grafenwoehr, Germany.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Visual Information Specialist Markus Rauchenberger/US Army

A US paratrooper with the 82nd Airborne Division lands with his parachute.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Visual Information Specialist Gertrud Zach/US Army

A French soldier watches soldiers descend from a Lockheed C-130 Hercules.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Spc. Lloyd Villanueva/US Army

US soldiers locate a target on a map.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Spc. Lloyd Villanueva/US Army

Multinational soldiers move toward their target.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Visual Information Specialist Jason Johnston/US Army

Multinational soldiers cut through the foliage.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Visual Information Specialist Jason Johnston/US Army

Soldiers weren’t the only ones dropped from the sky. Here, a US soldier prepares to untie a vehicle that had landed in the drop zone.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Visual Information Specialist Jason Johnston/US Army

A US paratrooper radios higher command while conducting defensive operations.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Spc. Gage Hull/US Army

A Polish soldier provides security while conducting defensive planning operations.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Spc. Gage Hull/US Army

Airplanes weren’t the only machines dominating the skies. Here, a United Kingdom Aerospatiale SA 330 Puma conducts an aerial-reconnaissance training mission.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Spc. Lloyd Villanueva/US Army

A British Parachute Regiment soldier prepares to load a helicopter while conducting a simulated medical evacuation.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Sgt. Seth Plagenza/US Army

In any real-life war scenario, bridges will be critical to both defensive and offensive forces. Here, military tactical vehicles prepare to engage their targets.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Visual Information Specialist Jason Johnston/US Army

A Polish soldier reloads his weapon while securing a bridge.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Visual Information Specialist Jason Johnston/US Army

Bridges will be fought for, from above and below.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Visual Information Specialist Jason Johnston/US Army

A British soldier provides security while conducting medical-evacuation simulations.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Spc. Nathaniel Nichols/US Army

The US wasn’t the only country that brought out their toys. Here, German Bundeswehr soldiers provide security while conducting a mounted patrol.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Staff Sgt. Nathaniel Allen/US Army

A French paratrooper aims his antitank weapon at an enemy tank.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Sgt. Juan F. Jimenez/US Army

A US soldier from the legendary 82nd Airborne Division readies a 60 mm mortar system for a simulated-fire mission.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Spc. Gage Hull/US Army

US soldiers of Chaos Company, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division prepare to move out with their Light Tactical All Terrain Vehicles.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Spc. Gage Hull/US Army

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This pilot crash-landed behind enemy lines to save his downed friend

On Dec. 4, 1950, Ensign Jesse Brown, the Navy’s first black aviator, was leading a six-plane reconnaissance patrol over North Korea near the Chosin Reservoir. Marines and soldiers on the ground were conducting a fighting retreat and Navy aviators were covering their withdrawal.


Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Ensign Jesse Brown and Lt. j.g. Thomas Hudner were part of an F4U Corsair flight over North Korea in 1950. Photo: Wikipedia/TMWolf

The Korean and Chinese soldiers were well-camouflaged, so Brown’s flight of F4U Corsairs from Fighter Squadron 32 flew at low altitudes to try and spot the enemy infantry. The noise of the engines prevented the pilots from hearing ground fire, but muzzle flashes began blinking against the snow.

Immediately after the shots, Lt. j.g. Thomas Hudner, a friend of Brown’s and a member of the flight, spotted vapor streaming from Brown’s engine. Hudner radioed Brown, who confirmed that he was quickly losing oil pressure. 17 miles behind enemy lines, Brown was going to crash.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Thomas Hudner as a new aviator in 1950. Photo: US Navy

Hudner pointed out an open expanse of snow where Brown could land with relative safety, but the crash was still violent enough that the cockpit buckled in. Hudner worried that Brown was dead until he began moving. Knowing that Brown wouldn’t survive long in the extreme winter cold of the Korean mountains, Hudner crash-landed his own plane near Brown’s.

He jumped from his cockpit and rushed to Brown. He attempted to free his friend, but saw that his leg was pinned down by the instrument panel.

Hudner began alternating between trying to free Brown and packing snow around the smoking engine to keep it from bursting into flames. When he got a chance, he returned to his plane and requested a rescue helicopter with an ax and fire extinguisher.

When the helicopter arrived, Hudner and the helicopter pilot, 1st Lt. Charles Ward, continued to try and free Brown. It became clear that they would need more equipment, and Hudner asked his friend to hold on.

“I told Jesse we couldn’t get him out without more equipment, and we were going to get more,” Hudner told The New York Times in 2013. “He didn’t respond. I think he died while we were talking to him.”

Hudner and Ward flew back to the USS Leyte Gulf. A few days later, Fighter Squadron 32 decided that they wouldn’t be able to secure the crash site and recover Brown’s remains, so they conducted a napalm run to burn them rather than allow their capture.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Ensign Jesse Brown in the cockpit of his fighter. Photo: Courtesy Adam Makos

Hudner later received the Medal of Honor for his attempts to save Brown. He stayed in the Navy until he retired as a captain in 1973.

Hudner and Brown had been unlikely friends. They met in the locker room of Fighter Squadron 32 in Dec. 1949, a year before the events at the Chosin Reservoir.

“Shortly after I joined the squadron, I was changing into flight gear and he came in and nodded ‘Hello,” Hudner said in The New York Times interview. “I introduced myself, but he made no gesture to shake hands. I think he did not want to embarrass me and have me not shake his hand. I think I forced my hand into his.”

Brown was the son of a Mississippi sharecropper who knew he wanted to be a Navy aviator since he was a child. He fought tooth-and-nail to overcome racial barriers and become one of the first African-American Navy officers and the first Navy’s first black aviator. Hudner was the privileged son of a Massachusetts business owner and a graduate of the Naval Academy.

The story of Brown and Hudner is the subject of “Devotion,” a new book by New York Times bestselling author Adam Makos. Hear Hudner tell the story in his own words in the video below.

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How the Coast Guard is going to play a big role in preventing terrorism in America’s ports

Security at shipping ports around the US, including testing containers and vessels for biological and radiological hazards, is a top priority to preventing terrorism, US Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly said July 20.


As he rode aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Aspen, near the Port of Los Angeles, Kelly viewed an array of new equipment used to test for radiation and biological threats.

“The threat always changes, so we always have to be on top of that,” Kelly said as the vessel cruised through the Pacific Ocean off Southern California.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Port of Los Angeles. Photo from Wikimedia Commons.

While he was aboard, members of the Coast Guard conducted a training demonstration, simulating the boarding of a ship with a radiological threat.

Members of the Coast Guard’s new California-based Maritime Safety and Security Team descended from helicopters with assault rifles and stormed the ship. Kelly watched from a deck above as they charged up stairwells and searched the ship as part of the exercise. Other crew members climbed up ladders from a smaller boat that pulled alongside.

“What they do, they do for you,” Kelly said.

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
USCG photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Jon-Paul Rios

As the vessel passed stacks of shipping containers at the Port of Los Angeles, Kelly said it is essential for law enforcement and Coast Guard personnel to constantly train and be prepared for any threats.

Kelly said he believes the current security levels at US shipping ports is adequate, but his agency must continue to research new technology to keep up with changing threats. His biggest concern, he said, is contraband, including illegal drugs that are shipped in from other countries.

“It is all about protecting the nation and doing it as fast as we can so normal legal commerce, normal legal people can come in and out of the country and be inconvenienced at the minimum,” Kelly said.

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7 heartwarming photos of Marine drill instructors screaming at teenagers

Marine drill instructors are pretty intimidating when they are two inches from your face, but those who have gone through the experience of boot camp don’t mind watching others get similar treatment.


In fact, watching teenage Marine wannabes endure the DI swarm is hilarious, fun, and hell — even warms our hearts.

Potential recruits in the delayed entry program are nowhere close to being Marines. They need to earn the eagle, globe, and anchor and — like others who have gone before — there will be plenty of drill instructors screaming at them before that happens.

Sgt. Reece Lodder, a Marine journalist with Recruiting Station Seattle, caught these photos of drill instructors doing what they do best. But instead of waiting for recruits to go to a Marine Corps Recruit Depot in San Diego or Parris Island, the DIs came to them.

Enlistees were “motivated” by drill instructors during a “pool function at the Yakima Training Center in Yakima, July 17, 2015,” according to the caption on Dvids. “During the event, recruiters teamed with drill instructors to physically and mentally prepare enlistees from Washington and Idaho for boot camp.”

Ah, memories.

Check them out:

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Wyatt Vogelzang, a Marine enlistee from Seattle, responds to a command from Sgt. Aldo Valencia, a drill instructor from Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego, during a Recruiting Station Seattle pool function at the Yakima Training Center in Yakima, Wash., July 17, 2015. During the event, recruiters teamed with drill instructors to physically and mentally prepare enlistees from Washington and Idaho for boot camp. The enlistees, part of the Marine Corps delayed entry program, are awaiting their ship dates. Vogelzang, 20, graduated from Roosevelt High School and was recruited by Sgt. Bryan Mack. Valencia, 25, is from Denver and is currently assigned to Delta Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion. (U.S Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Reece Lodder)

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Samantha Holmberg, a Marine enlistee from Auburn, Wash., responds to a command from Sgt. Tina Quevedo, a drill instructor from Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C., during a Recruiting Station Seattle pool function at the Yakima Training Center in Yakima, Wash., July 17, 2015. During the event, recruiters teamed with drill instructors to physically and mentally prepare enlistees from Washington and Idaho for boot camp. The enlistees, part of the Marine Corps delayed entry program, are awaiting their ship dates. Holmberg, 18, graduated from Auburn High School and was recruited by Sgt. Thomas Bell. Quevedo, 24, is from Long Beach, Calif., and is assigned to November Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion. (U.S Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Reece Lodder)

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Seung Gwon Cho (center), a Marine enlistee from Lynnwood, Wash., responds to corrections from drill instructors Sgts. Aldo Valencia (left), Julian Taylor (second from left), Donald Jackson (second from right) and Tina Quevedo (right) during a Recruiting Station Seattle pool function at the Yakima Training Center in Yakima, Wash., July 17, 2015. During the event, recruiters teamed with drill instructors to physically and mentally prepare enlistees from Washington and Idaho for boot camp. The enlistees, part of the Marine Corps delayed entry program, are awaiting their ship dates. Cho, 18, graduated from Meadowdale High School and was recruited by Sgt. Ricardo Schebesta. Valencia, 25, is from Denver and is assigned to Delta Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion. Taylor, 26, is from St. Augustine, Fla., and is assigned to Lima Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion. Jackson, 28, is from Suffolk, Va., and is assigned to MCRD San Diego. Quevedo, 24, is from Long Beach, Calif., and is currently assigned to November Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion. (U.S Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Reece Lodder)

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Sgt. Donald Jackson (center), a drill instructor from Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego, teaches Marine enlistees discipline during a Recruiting Station Seattle pool function at the Yakima Training Center in Yakima, Wash., July 17, 2015. During the event, recruiters teamed with drill instructors to physically and mentally prepare enlistees from Washington and Idaho for boot camp. The enlistees, part of the Marine Corps delayed entry program, are awaiting their ship dates. Jackson, 28, is from Suffolk, Va. (U.S Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Reece Lodder)

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Sgt. Stephen Wills, a drill instructor from Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego, instructs Marine enlistees to clean up their gear during a Recruiting Station Seattle pool function at the Yakima Training Center in Yakima, Wash., July 17, 2015. During the event, recruiters teamed with drill instructors to physically and mentally prepare enlistees from Washington and Idaho for boot camp. The enlistees, part of the Marine Corps delayed entry program, are awaiting their ship dates. Wills, 24, is from Phoenix and is assigned to Echo Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion. (U.S Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Reece Lodder)

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Sgts. Stephen Wills (left) and Brandon Hendrix, drill instructors from Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego, motivate Jose Garcia, a Marine enlistee from Yakima, Wash., during a Recruiting Station Seattle pool function at the Yakima Training Center in Yakima, July 17, 2015. During the event, recruiters teamed with drill instructors to physically and mentally prepare enlistees from Washington and Idaho for boot camp. The enlistees, part of the Marine Corps delayed entry program, are awaiting their ship dates. Wills, 24, is from Phoenix and is assigned to Echo Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion. Hendrix, 26, is from Redlands, Calif., and is assigned to Lima Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion. Garcia, 17, is set to become a senior at Eisenhower High School in Yakima and was recruited by Sgt. James Campos. (U.S Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Reece Lodder)

Hitler had a secret plan to take over Britain — and his generals thought it was idiotic
Miekha Dowling, a prospective Marine enlistee from Lakewood, Wash., responds to guidance from Sgt. Julian Taylor, a drill instructor from Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego, during a Recruiting Station Seattle pool function at the Yakima Training Center in Yakima, Wash., July 17, 2015. During the event, recruiters teamed with drill instructors to physically and mentally prepare enlistees from Washington and Idaho for boot camp. The enlistees, part of the Marine Corps delayed entry program, are awaiting their ship dates. Dowling, 16, attends Lakes High School in Lakewood. Taylor, 26, is from St. Augustine, Fla., and is assigned to Lima Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion. (U.S Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Reece Lodder)

EVEN BETTER: 23 photos of drill instructors terrifying the hell out of Marine recruits