MIGHTY HISTORY

This Medal of Honor recipient was the Navy's first ace-in-a-day

Not only did Navy Lt. Edward H. "Butch" O'Hare earn a Medal of Honor and down seven enemy aircraft in the war, he downed five of them in one engagement, resulting in "ace-in-a-day" status.

Navy Lt. Cmdr. Edward H. "Butch" O'Hare was a pioneer of Navy aviation, establishing the Navy's first night fighter squadron, earning a Medal of Honor and ace-in-a-day status, and probably saving American carrier USS Lexington before his tragic death during a night battle in November, 1943.


The senior Edward O'Hare was murdered by the Al Capone gang while driving home.

O'Hare was the son of a St. Louis, Missouri, businessman with ties to Al Capone's gang. His father put in a good word to get the younger O'Hare into the U.S. Naval Academy, which led to his being trained as an aviator.

During his training, his father turned against Capone after the events of the Valentine's Day Massacre and passed financial documents to the IRS. Capone was eventually convicted, but put a hit out on O'Hare's father. Then-Ensign O'Hare took a break from training to attend his father's funeral, but went on to earn his wings 18 months before the Pearl Harbor attacks. He earned a reputation as a skilled aviator before America entered World War II.

Edward O'Hare as a pilot during World War II as a lieutenant. He rose to the rank of lieutenant commander and helped create night aviation procedures for the Navy before his death during the war.

(U.S. Navy)

His first engagement came near the Pacific island of Rabaul while his wing was temporarily assigned to the USS Lexington. A patrolling submarine spotted waves of Japanese "Betty" bombers heading for the Lexington's task force on February 20, 1942. Fighters took to the air, and O'Hare and his wingman were the last pair to get airborne.

While the first fighters to take off dealt with the first wave of bombers, a second wave closed in and the O'Hare pair were the only fighters in position to attack. They did a quick test fire of their weapons. O'Hare had four working guns, but his wingman couldn't fire.

And so O'hare was left facing either eight or nine attacking bombers — accounts differ — with only his F4F Wildcat protecting the carrier. He had just a few minutes to interrupt the enemy attack.

The USS Lexington was America's second carrier and a legend in World War II. But it likely would have been destroyed early in the war if it weren't for Lt. Cmdr. Edward H. O'Hare.

(U.S. Navy)

O'Hare zipped into position and focused his first attack on two bombers trailing on the right side of the enemy formation, downing both with quick, accurate bursts from his four .50-cal. Browning machine guns against their engines and fuel tanks. By the time he had downed the second bomber, he had overtaken the formation so he wheeled back around and came up the left side.

This time, he hit the rearmost plane with shots to the starboard engine that sent it wheeling toward the sea. O'Hare attacked again, slaughtering a fourth plane and crew with shots through the left wing and cockpit.

It had been only moments, and approximately half of the enemy formation had hit the water or was on its way. But that still left about four bombers heading to Lady Lex. So, O'Hare went in for a third attack pass as the fight drew into range of the Lex's guns.

He sent a burst into the trail plane and then sent more rounds at the lead plane of the formation, knocking one of its engines off.

The kills had come so fast and furious that officers on the Lexington would later report seeing three fireballs heading for the ocean at once.

Between O'Hare and shipboard gunners, only two of the Japanese "Bettys" were still alive to drop their bombs, and none of the bombs managed to damage the carrier at all. O'Hare would claim six kills from the engagement, but he would only get credited with five. Either way, that took him from zero kills to fighter ace in a single engagement. This made him the Navy's second fighter ace and its first ace-in-a-day as the service's air arm was young and relatively small in World War I.

O'Hare tried to eschew glory for his success, but the U.S. was hungry for a hero in the months after Pearl Harbor and a series of U.S. defeats. The young pilot was summoned to Washington D.C. to receive the Medal of Honor, then he was sent to fill an instructor slot to pass on his knowledge to others.

F6F Hellcats were strong successors to the F4F Wildcat and they allowed naval pilots to become more lethal against Japanese forces.

(U.S. Navy)

But that couldn't keep O'Hare engaged, and he returned to combat in 1943, this time flying the Wildcat's stronger successor, the F6F Hellcat. In just a few months during the latter half of 1943, O'Hare earned two Distinguished Flying Crosses, one for an attack on Japanese forces on Marcus Island where he and his flight destroyed all aircraft on the ground and approximately 80 percent of ground installations, and another for an attack against Wake Island installations where the flight downed three enemies in the air and destroyed planes and installations on the ground.

But the American forces were vulnerable deep in the Pacific, and O'Hare was tasked with finding a way to stop Japanese dusk attacks had allowed damage to the USS Independence. His proposal to create three-plane teams with two Hellcats and a radar-equipped Avenger was quickly adopted. The carriers would detect enemy planes first and vector the fighter in until the Avenger could detect the targets.

In this 1951 photo, the plane closest to the camera is an Avenger, the plane that O'Hare paired with F6F Hellcats in order to make them more effective at dusk and in the early night. The rest of the planes on the deck are F8F Bearcats, successors to the Hellcat.

(U.S. Navy)

O'Hare referred to them as the "Black Panthers" and often went aloft with them. On November 26, 1943, he went up to help disrupt an attack by more Japanese Bettys. The flight was able to shoot down one bomber and then the Hellcats worked to get back in line with the Avenger.

Right as the Hellcats returned to the Avenger, though, a Japanese plane slipped in behind them and sent a burst through O'Hare's plane. The tail gunner in the Avenger downed the attacker, but O'Hare and his plane slipped away into the dark and crashed into the water.

He was never found again, but did receive a posthumous Navy Cross for his contributions to Navy night fighting. Chicago's O'Hare airport is named for him. One of his top subordinates and wingmen was Lt. j.g. Alex Vraciu, who ended the war as the Navy's fourth top ace.

Coincidentally, Vraciu earned six of his kills in a single engagement after taking off from the USS Lexington, copying O'Hare's claimed feat from 1942.