MIGHTY MILSPOUSE

Mighty MilSpouse: Meet Nikki James Zellner

2:20 p.m. on February 20, 2020, is not a time Nikki James Zellner will soon forget.


Zellner received an emergency notification from the daycare her two sons, Ronan and Owen, attend in Virginia Beach, where the Navy family is stationed. The facility alerted parents to come pick up their children due to a carbon monoxide leak.

"When we arrived, the children and staff had been evacuated and I was starting to hear stories related to what was going on behind the scenes," she said. "The one that gave me the biggest pause was that a teacher's husband had to bring in a detector because the teachers and students were getting sick after hours of symptoms, and there was no detector on site, because there was no Virginia law requiring them to be."

At that moment, the narrative for Zellner went from "this happened to my child" to "I'm not going to let this happen to anyone else's child."

She started by communicating directly with the daycare, asking direct questions, and refusing to jump to conclusions.

"While waiting for their feedback, I got busy researching," Zellner explained. "I learned that carbon monoxide (CO) detectors weren't required in Virginia schools, regardless of if they had a source for CO on-site (common sources are fuel-fired sources like furnaces, HVAC systems, kitchen appliances), if the school was built prior to 2015. It wasn't part of the state code – and in Virginia, it wouldn't be retrofitted to existing unless legislation was passed to make it apply."

But Zellner's research also uncovered a scary reality nationwide.

"Only five states require CO detectors in educational facilities like daycares, public schools, private schools and any place where children are taken care of," she said. "How many kids and educators aren't being protected because people just assume carbon monoxide detectors are on site?"

Zellner's first points of contact were Senators, Representatives and Delegates that represent Virginia and her district. Then, she spoke to the Director of State Building Codes at the Department of Housing and Community Development to make sure she had a firm understanding exactly of the law and when it applied.

"I also started a petition making folks aware of the situation," she shared. "Within three days, we had 1,000 signatures. Within the week, we had a breaking news story and a commitment from one of the Delegates to work with us on possibly introducing legislation in the 2021 session."

To date, Zellner's petition has more than 1,200 signatures, and her determination landed her on the front page of the Sunday edition of Virginia's leading newspaper.

"There's this strange feeling that comes over you when you know that you're the person that's supposed to do something," Zellner emphasized. "That you have the means to do something, and you have the unique perspective to tell the story on why something needs to change. I have a background in media relations and content development, I know how to investigate and ask direct questions, I know how to navigate the political landscape after working in a nonprofit and I'm not afraid to put myself in the line of fire and make a ruckus about it. These are our children. These are our educators. It's too big of a risk. I feel compelled to raise awareness about it – I can't explain it any other way. All stakeholders are accountable for solving this – hopefully before it upgrades from close call to tragedy."

What inspires you about the military community?

The most inspiring thing to me about the military community is their ability to problem solve any situation. What's today's mission? How can we help each other? What's our end goal? This isn't just the service members – these are the wives, the mil-kids, the support givers – it truly is a community of givers. And it's up to each member of the community to give more than they take – and I think that really sets the military community apart.

What piece of advice would you give to fellow military spouses?

The biggest piece of advice I have for military spouses is to share your stories. Get comfortable talking about the uncomfortable. Humanize your experiences and make those connections. If we as a group want people to understand our lives, we have to share our lives not just inside but outside of the military community.

What is your life motto?

"What's the point of having a voice if you're going to stay silent in those moments you shouldn't be?"

If you could pick one song as the theme song of your life, what would it be and why?

'No Hard Feelings' by The Avett Brothers. The Avett Brothers have some of the most honest music out there – and this one just really hits home for me. For me, it's really about forgiving and being forgiven – and just being able to distinguish what's important and what's not so you can live a meaningful life. I think it's my theme song because even after some really impossible hardships, I'm still able to take gifts from those moments instead of just pain.

What’s your superpower?

I have a fierce love for my people. I will turn superhuman when it comes to their needs – regardless of how much time I have or what's going on in my life. If you're someone I trust and love, I will spring into action for you in the biggest way possible.