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The Marine Corps has ordered Leathernecks to use PMAGs for their rifles

After testing revealed problems with how standard-issued magazines load certain ammunition into Marine rifles, the Corps has ordered Leathernecks to use the wildly popular polymer-made Magpul PMAG.


The Marine Corps has just authorized Marine units to purchase the Magpul PMAG GenM3 magazine saying government-issued ones don't work as well with all Marine weapons.(Photo by WATM)

"The Magpul GenM3 PMag was the only magazine to perform to acceptable levels across all combinations of Marine Corps 5.56mm rifles and ammunition during testing," the Marine Corps' top gear buying office told WATM.

In a Corpswide message released in mid December, Marine Corps Systems Command issued guidance ordering Marines to use the Magpul Industries-made PMAG Gen. M3 with M-16, M-4 and M-27 rifles, as well as the M-249 machine gun.

Industry sources say the issue stems from how the Army's new M855A1 Enhanced Performance Round feeds from government issued magazines, causing damage to the internal components of the Marine Corps' M27 — a version of the Heckler & Koch 416 rifle.

"It was damaging the feed ramps and the chamber face of the 416," an industry source told WATM. "It was presenting the M855A1 round at a lower angle and damaging the upper barrel extension."

A soldier packs the popular Magpul PMAG into combat. The Marine Corps has just issued guidance saying all units must use the PMAG since government-issued ones don't perform well on certain Marine rifles. (Photo by U.S. Army)

In fact, the Army was having its own problems with the standard magazine and the M855A1 round, so it developed a new magazine, dubbed the "Enhanced Performance Magazine" to deal with the issue.

But that one didn't work for the Corps either.

"The legacy metal 30-round magazines are no longer manufactured and their replacement, the Enhanced Performance Magazine (EPM), does not perform to acceptable levels with all combinations of the Marine Corps' 5.56mm rifle platforms and ammunition," the Corps told WATM.

The Corps — along with the Army — had reportedly banned use of after-market magazines, including the PMAG, in 2012 after troops were having problems with poorly-made knockoffs.

Magpul was one of the first companies to introduce polymer-built magazines for M-16s, and M-4s and the PMAG became increasingly popular among soldiers and Marines fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The new PMAG GenM3 takes advantage of 10 years of experience building magazines for a variety of rifles and calibers, incorporating enhanced geometry, better followers and an optimized round-count window, Magpul officials said.

"We haven't had a single stoppage in any testing of the PMAG GenM3," a Magpul official told WATM. "We're happy to help the Marine Corps in a way that enhances the warfighter."

The Corps is not buying PMAGs to replace all its current magazines, but is instead giving units the option to buy their own.

"There are currently no procurements for any of the 5.56 rifle platforms and as we normally only issue magazines with a new weapon fielding, there are no plans to issue Magpul magazines at the service-level," the Corps said. "Unit procurement through Defense Logistics Agency is expected to be comparable to current commercial cost on the open market."