Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy - We Are The Mighty
Articles

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy

On June 6, 1944, the Allies invaded Normandy, France, in the largest amphibious assault in history, also known as D-Day.

By then, Europe had been largely controlled by Nazi Germany for four long years. Operation Overlord, as the invasion was known, included 5,000 ships, 11,000 airplanes, and 150,000 Allied troops as they hit five beaches in a synchronized attack across the English channel.

American battalions suffered crippling losses during the Normandy invasion, but the story of A Company, 1st Battalion, 116th Infantry is especially devastating. Tasked with capturing a road that led to the small French village of Vierville, things began to go wrong for the company before it even reached the shore. Rough seas left the men dazed and sea sick. Heavy clouds blocked the view of U.S. bombers, stopping them from taking out the German gunners that waited for the company in the Dog Green Sector of Omaha Beach. When company A finally did run aground, it was overwhelmed by German mortar, artillery and machine gun fire. In under 20 minutes, 60 percent of the company’s men — many of whom had never seen battle before — were dead or wounded.

German forces were greatly outnumbered at Normandy, largely because the details of where the Allied invasion would take place was kept under lock and key until the moment troops hit the beaches on June 6th, 1944. A double agent working for the allies also gave the Germans false information about where the operation would occur, leaving the real locations with little German defense in place. It’s estimated that there were 175,000 allied troops on the beaches that day compared to a measly 10,000 Germans. Which begs the question: Why didn’t Germany just order reinforcements to those locations? Apparently, it was because Hitler was asleep! German officers were too afraid to wake up the Fuhrer, and too scared to send more troops without his permission. 

The Allied advance failed to achieve its inland objectives that first day, but the amazing sacrifice by thousands of men had cracked the Atlantic Wall, dooming Hitler and the Third Reich. Still, another year of heavy fighting loomed between the beaches and Berlin.

Articles

13 funniest military memes for the week of March 24

Never sure what to put in the intro paragraphs on the military memes list. After all, no one is clicking on a memes list to read a bunch of text.


So, here are 13 of the funniest military memes the internet had to offer:

1. Probably a made man in the E-4 Mafia or something (via The Salty Soldier).

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
Love the dude over his shoulder who looks like an aide on a Blackberry or something.

2. In the ASVAB waiver’s defense, it’s unlikely that anyone is taking that metal bar from the hatch without unhooking the clip first (via Sh-t my LPO says).

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
Anyone can walk through the hatch with no issue, but they’re going to have to unclip that bar or at least loosen the chain to steal it.

3. If you don’t see what’s wrong with this, try it at home and see what happens (via Sh-t my LPO says).

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
Also, congrats on being a Marine.

ALSO SEE: That time Marines in a firefight called customer service for help with an M-107

4. “I work just hard enough to prevent a briefing on working hard.”

(via Air Force amn/nco/snco)

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
The motivation is in college. Go there instead.

5. The career counselors and retention NCOs should probably just avoid everyone who looks that dead inside (via The Salty Soldier).

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
But of course, then they wouldn’t be able to retain many folks.

6. Oh, the that last one exists. We found one (via Team Non-Rec).

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
No word on how they disappear at will (usually before formations).

7. Someone is getting 24-hour duty this weekend and doesn’t know it (via Decelerate Your Life).

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy

8. This dude is like a Space Balls character (via Coast Guard Memes).

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
Did no one have any PT belts they could put on?

9. “Everyone check for their sensitive items before we get on the bird.” *5 minutes later*

(via Pop smoke)

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy

10. Come on, it won’t interfere with the pro mask (via Pop smoke).

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
Everyone with a military regulation mustache is one slip in the latrine/head from a Hitler mustache.

11. Wonder how long Top Gun’s orientation PowerPoint is (via Why I’m Not Re-enlisting).

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy

12. It’s not piracy if it was already off the books (via PNN – Private News Network).

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
Just make sure the connex didn’t belong to the E4 Mafia. Otherwise, you will lose more equipment than you gain.

13. Sick call at 4:45 isn’t all that much better (via Lost in the Sauce).

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy

Articles

That time Taylor Swift dropped in on a World War II vet

World War II vets often have tales of meeting Hollywood stars doing USO tours. Well, Clyde Porter has one that is a lot more recent.


According to a report by the BBC, Porter got something many vets wished they got from Ingrid Bergman (among others), 71 years after the end of World War II.

This visit was from none other than music superstar and sometime actress Taylor Swift!

Porter’s been a fan of Ms. Swift – one of her oldest – as a way to get closer with his grandchildren. He told a local TV station that he’d taken two of his granddaughters to some of her concerts.

Well, word got back to the superstar, and she decided to surprise Mr. Porter, who saw action in the European Theater of Operations.

And what a surprise it was! She dropped by the 96-year-old vet’s home, spending hours with the family, and giving them a private performance of her hit “Shake it Off.” Porter, who is fighting cancer, has expressed his goal is to catch a concert on Ms. Swift’s next tour.

Bravo Zulu, Taylor Swift! Here’s the video for the song she sang:

Articles

This big ol’ plane is getting a big ol’ stand-down order

Air Mobility Command has grounded the C-5 Galaxy cargo planes operating at Dover Air Force Base in Delaware after a nose landing-gear unit malfunctioned for the second time in 60 days.


The stand-down order, issued July 17, affects all 18 C-5s stationed at Dover — 12 of them are primary and six are backup aircraft, according to a release.

The Air Force has 56 C-5s in service.

“Aircrew safety is always my top priority and is taken very seriously,” Air Mobility Command’s chief, Gen. Carlton D. Everhart II, said in a release. “We are taking the appropriate measures to properly diagnose the issue and implement a solution.”

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
USAF photo by Airman 1st Class Elizabeth Baker

An Air Mobility Command spokesman told Military.com that both malfunctions involved C-5M Super Galaxy aircraft. On May 22 and again July 15, the planes’ “nose landing gear could not extend all the way,” the spokesman said. The C-5M was introduced in 2009 and is the latest model of the C-5.

Air Force personnel will perform inspections “to ensure proper extension and retraction of the C-5 nose landing gear,” Air Mobility Command said. The halt applies only to C-5s at Dover, and Air Mobility Command said it would work to minimize the effect on worldwide operations.

Also read: Behold, the largest plane in the US Air Force

The C-5 is the Air Force’s largest airlifter. It has a 65-foot-tall tail and is 247 feet long with a 223-foot wingspan. The first version, the C-5A, entered service in 1970, and several models have joined the fleet since then.

The C-5M was given more powerful engines, allowing it to carry more cargo and take off over a shorter distance. It can haul 120,000 pounds of cargo more than 5,500 miles — the distance from Dover to Incirlik Air Base in Turkey — without refueling. Without cargo, its range is more than 8,000 miles.

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
USAF Airmen load an M1A1 Abrams Tank into an Air Force C-5M Super Galaxy cargo aircraft. (USAF photo by Roland Balik)

In recent years, budgets cuts and sequestration compelled Air Force leadership to begin taking C-5Ms out of service.

Everhart, the Air Mobility Command chief, said in March that total C-5 inventory had fallen to 56 from 112 a few years ago.

But the Air Force has made moves to reverse that deactivation, saying it plans to move at least eight mothballed C-5Ms back into service, using newly allocated funds, over the next four years.

That return to service would partially overlap with an upgrade project for the active fleet of airlifters that is slated to wrap up in 2018.

“I need them back because there’s real-world things that we’ve got to move, and they give me that … added assurance capability,” Everhart told lawmakers at the end of March.

Articles

This is how officials are reacting to White House ban on transgender troops

President Donald Trump is barring transgender people from serving in the military “in any capacity.” He’s citing “tremendous medical costs and disruption.”


Trump’s announcement on the morning of July 26 on Twitter did not say what would happen to transgender people already in the military.

The president tweeted that after consulting with “generals and military experts,” the government “will not accept or allow Transgender individuals to serve in any capacity in the US Military.”

A Rand Corp. study estimated that there are between 2,500 and 7,000 transgender service members on active duty and an additional 1,500 to 4,000 in the reserves.

Transgender service members have been able to serve openly in the military since last year, when former Defense Secretary Ash Carter ended the ban.

The Pentagon seems to have been unaware that President Donald Trump has decided to bar transgender people from the military.

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
Photo by Gage Skidmore

A Pentagon spokesman, Navy Capt. Jeff Davis, refused to answer questions about what Trump’s tweeted announcement means for the current policy, including whether transgender people already serving in the military will be kicked out.

“Call the White House,” he said.

The White House press office did not immediately respond to request for comment.

House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi is slamming President Donald Trump’s ban on transgender people serving in the military as “vile and hateful.”

In a statement, Pelosi pointed out Trump’s decision came on the same day in 1948 that President Harry S. Truman signed the executive order desegregating the military.

The California Democrat called Trump’s action “a cruel and arbitrary decision designed to humiliate transgender Americans who stepped forward to serve our country.”

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
Minority Leader of the United States House of Representatives, Nancy Pelosi

She said a study commissioned by the department found the cost of providing medically necessary transition-related care would be $2 million to $8 million a year, a small amount from what the Pentagon spends on military care.

She said the “disgusting ban” will weaken the military and the nation it defends. She said Trump’s conduct is not driven by “honor, decency, or national security, but by raw prejudice.”

The Pentagon, which appeared to be caught off-guard by Trump’s tweets barring transgender people from the military, is referring all questions about them to the White House.

Navy Capt. Jeff Davis said in a brief written statement that the Pentagon is working with the White House to “address” what he calls “the new guidance” from the president on transgender individuals serving in the military.

Davis said the Pentagon will provide revised guidance to Defense Department officials “in the near future.”

The top Democrat on the House Armed Services Committee is calling President Donald Trump’s newly announced ban on transgender military service “an unwarranted and disgraceful attack.”

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
Washington State Representative Adam Smith (left) and former United States Secretary of Defense, Ash Carter (right). DoD photo by Air Force Senior Master Sgt. Adrian Cadiz.

Rep. Adam Smith of Washington says preventing transgender people from joining the military and pushing out “those who have devoted their lives to this country would be ugly and discriminatory in the extreme.”

Smith also is challenging the estimates cited by conservative lawmakers that show the Pentagon end up spending hundreds of millions of dollars over the next decade to pay for gender transition surgeries and hormone therapies.

He says those figures “have no basis in fact” and likely were “cooked up by right-wing advocacy organizations whose real interest is not to support military readiness but to further discrimination.”

Ash Carter, who as secretary of defense last year ended the ban on transgender people serving openly in the military, is criticizing President Donald Trump’s decision to ban their service.

Carter issued a statement July 26 saying that the important thing for choosing who is allowed to serve is whether they are best qualified.

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
Former United States Secretary of Defense, Ash Carter.

“To choose service members on other grounds than military qualification,” he said, “is social policy and has no place in our military.”

Carter added that transgender individuals already are serving capably and honorably in the military.

A national LGBTQ advocacy group says President Donald Trump’s decision to bar transgender people from military service is an “all-out assault” on these individuals.

Stephen Peters, a spokesman for the Human Rights Campaign, tells The Associated Press that Trump’s decision was “alarming” because it comes after a decade of progress toward inclusion in the military. Peters says the decision is “morally reprehensible,” ”patently unpatriotic,” and dangerous because it “puts a target on the backs of thousands of service members.”

Trump announced on Twitter that he is barring transgender people from service in the military “in any capacity.” He cited “tremendous medical costs and disruption.”

Peters says the decision doesn’t appear to have factored in the effect on military morale and readiness.

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
Tammy Duckworth (right) is sworn in as assistant secretary of veterans affairs for public and intergovernmental affairs by Judge John J. Farley on May 20, 2009. Photo from Department of Veterans Affairs.

Sen. Tammy Duckworth, a double amputee veteran of the Iraq War, is slamming President Donald Trump’s ban on transgender Americans serving in the military.

Duckworth said in a statement July 26 that when her Black Hawk helicopter was shot down, she didn’t care “if the American troops risking their lives to help save me were gay, straight, transgender, or anything else. All that mattered was they didn’t leave me behind.”

The Illinois senator said anyone willing to risk their lives for their country should be able to serve no matter gender or sexual orientation or race.

She said, “Anything else is discriminatory and counterproductive to our national security.”

 

Articles

The 5 most legendary American battleships ever

Battleships were floating fortresses, capable of both dishing out and taking a lot of punishment.


America got her first true battleship in 1895 and decommissioned the last one in 1992.

Here are 5 among them that earned legendary reputations during that period:

1. The USS Texas “avenged” its sister, the USS Maine.

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
The USS Texas. Photo: Public Domain via Wikipedia

America got its first proper battleship in 1895 with the commissioning of the USS Texas. Texas entered the fleet just ahead of the USS Maine. When the Maine was lost in Havana Harbor on Feb. 15, 1898 to an explosion of unknown origin and America declared war on Spain, the Texas was one of the ships sent against Spanish possessions in the Atlantic.

Texas and another ship destroyed the Spanish fort at Cayo del Tore in a mere 75 minutes. Later, Spanish ships attempted to run the American blockade and the Texas attacked four of them simultaneously, heavily damaging each and forcing them to run aground. She then assisted in the destruction of the rest of the Spanish fleet, helping to force the end of the war.

2. USS Alabama fought in both the Atlantic and Pacific with distinction.

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
The Alabama is now a museum in it’s namesake state. Photo: Wikipedia/Tigerplish via CC BY-SA 3.0

The USS Alabama completed its shakedown in Jan. 1943 before being sent to escort merchantmen past Nazi submarine patrols and across the Atlantic to Britain and Russia. Soon after, she was sent to Norway lure out the Tirpitz and to support a feint that distracted the Germans from the invasion of Sicily.

In the middle of 1943, Alabama was sent to the Pacific via America for repairs. In the Pacific, the ship assisted in the assaults on a number of islands including Tarawa, the Marshall Islands, and the Japanese-held Philippines. It also protected carriers from enemy planes and bombarded the Japanese home island of Honshu before the Japanese surrender.

3. USS Iowa saw combat in World War II, Korea, and the Persian Gulf war.

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
The Iowa fires all of its guns during a 1984 firepower demonstration. Photo: US Navy PH1 Jeff Hilton

The USS Iowa entered World War II in Aug. 1943, operating in the Atlantic and carrying President Franklin D. Roosevelt to North Africa. Iowa later headed to the Pacific where she assisted in a number of landings and helped the Alabama shell Honshu, the island that Tokyo sits on.

Iowa was reactivated for the Korean War and then the Persian Gulf War. During the Gulf War, the Iowa carried a number of Tomahawk and Harpoon missiles and escorted Kuwaiti oil tankers to international waters.

4. USS New Jersey was the most decorated battleship in U.S. history.

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
The USS New Jersey with all guns blazing. Photo: US Navy

The USS New Jersey first served in World War II, striking targets across the Pacific. She went into reserve status after the War but was called back up to pound positions in Korea. The New Jersey was placed on reserve status in 1957 but returned to active service in 1968, providing artillery support to forces in the Vietnam War.

After another period of deactivation, the Jersey was upgraded in 1982 with cruise missiles and supported American operations in the Lebanese War from 1983-1984. Over decades of service the USS New Jersey was awarded with 19 battle stars.

5. Mighty Mo’ hosted the Japanese surrender ceremony and was America’s last battleship.

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
USS Missouri engages a target during naval exercises. Photo: US Navy PH1 Terry Cosgrove

The USS Missouri was the last American battleship to be commissioned and the last one to be decommissioned, serving from 1944 to 1992. Mighty Mo’ bombarded Japanese positions at Iwo Jima, Okinawa, and the Japanese mainland. As the flagship of the 3rd Fleet in 1945, the ship played host to the Japanese surrender ceremony that marked the end of World War II.

In her later years of service, Mo’ attacked enemy positions in the Korean War and was part of the fake landing of amphibious forces on the Iraqi coast in Desert Storm. After its final decommissioning in 1992, the USS Missouri was converted into the Battleship Missouri Memorial in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

Articles

Army to start fielding new jungle boots next year

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
A U.S. Soldier crosses a stream during the 12-day Australian Army Junior Leader Jungle Training Course last year in Australia. | US Army photo


U.S. Army officials say they’re racing to find and start issuing new jungle boots to combat soldiers by late next year.

The service just released a request for information from companies as part of a “directed requirement” for a new model of Jungle Combat Boot for infantry soldiers to wear in the hot, tropical terrain of the Pacific theater.

Also read: The beloved ‘woobie’ gets a much-needed update

“It’s a challenge to industry to say, ‘What can you do based on here are the requirements that we need and how fast can you deliver it to meet these specifications,’ ” Col. Dean Hoffman IV, who manages Project Manager Soldier Protection and Individual Equipment, said Wednesday at theAssociation of the United States Army’s annual meeting.

The Army’s formal requirement for a new type of Jungle Combat Boot will continue to go through the normal acquisitions process, but equipment officials plan to award contracts for new jungle boots next year to meet a recent directive from Chief of Staff Gen. Mark Milley that two brigade combat teams in Hawaii be equipped “ASAP,” Hoffman said.

“We are going to use this request for information to see what industry can do really fast because what we would like to do is get a BCT out by March of 2017,” he said.

Equipment officials hope to have a second BCT fielded with new jungle boots by September 2017,” according to the Oct. 3 document posted on FedBizOpps.gov.

The Army and the Marine Corps retired the popular, Vietnam War-era jungle boots in the early 2000s when both services transitioned to a desert-style combat boot for combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Since then, Army equipment development has been geared toward the Middle East, Hoffman said.

“We have kind of neglected the extreme weather environments, whether it be jungle or cold weather,” Hoffman said. “Looking at the way the world is shaping, those are areas that we might have to go.”

The Army recently conducted limited user evaluations of several commercial-off-the-shelf, or COTS, jungle boots in Hawaii.

“We put them on soldiers, let them wear them for a couple of weeks and got feedback,” Hoffman said. “What that showed at that time was there was no COTS solution.”

The Army is looking for lightweight materials and better insole and midsole construction, he said.

The problem with the old jungle boots was they had a metal shim in the sole for puncture protection that made the boots get too hot or too cold depending on the outside temperature, Hoffman said.

There are new fabrics that could offer some puncture protection for insoles as well as help push water out of the boot through drain holes, equipment officials say.

The two drain holes on the old jungle boots often became clogged with mud, Hoffman said, adding that newer designs that feature several smaller drain holes tend to be more effective.

The new jungle boots will likely be made of rough-out leather, which tends to dry out quickly and doesn’t need to be shined, he said.

To outfit two brigades, the Army plans to buy 36,000 pairs of new jungle boots, but contracts may be awarded to multiple vendors, Hoffman said.

“If six vendors meet the requirements, we might just award six contracts because, at the end of the day, we want to meet the requirements,” he said.

Articles

The ultimate guide to having heated political conversations

Our guidance for having heated political conversations?

DON’T.

Read much better and actually helpful guidance from We Are The Mighty:

Also helpful:

And pictures of puppies in Santa hats because we love you.

Articles

Here are the best military photos of the week

The military has very talented photographers in the ranks, and they constantly attempt to capture what life as a service member is like during training and at war. Here are the best military photos of the week:


AIR FORCE:

The U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Retired Reese Hines poses for a portrait showing his Explosive Ordnance Disposal occupational badge prosthetic eye, during the archery competition at the 2016 DoD Warrior Games held at U.S. Military Academy at West Point, NY, June17, 2016.

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
U.S. Air Force Photo by Staff Sgt. Carlin Leslie

U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Israel Del Toro Jr. from Joliet, Ill., listens to instructions for adjusting the sight on his compound bow during the archery competition at the 2016 DoD Warrior Games held at U.S. Military Academy at West Point, N.Y., June 17, 2016.

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
U.S. Air Force Photo by Tech. Sgt. Steve Grever

ARMY:

Soldiers scan the seafloor for obstructions and take depth measurements to ensure ships can safely maneuver in the waters near the port during a logistics exercise in Alameda, Calif., June 18, 2016.

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
U.S. Army Reserve photo by Cpl. Timothy Yao

NAVY:

PACIFIC OCEAN (June 22, 2016) USS John C. Stennis’ (CVN 74) Sailors clime back aboard after jumping from the USS John C. Stennis’ (CVN 74) aircraft elevator during a swim call. Providing a ready force supporting security and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific, John C. Stennis is operating as part of the Great Green Fleet on a regularly scheduled 7th Fleet deployment.

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Bryan Niegel

PACIFIC OCEAN (June 22, 2016) Midshipmen 2nd Class Alex Harper is transferred from the guided-missile destroyer USS Chung-Hoon (DDG 93) to the fast combat support ship USNS Rainier (T-AOE 7) during a high line passenger transfer. Providing a ready force supporting security and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific, Chung-Hoon is operating as part of the John C. Stennis Strike Group and Great Green Fleet on a regularly scheduled 7th Fleet deployment.

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Marcus L. Stanley

MARINE CORPS:

Sgt. Anthony Lee, a reconnaissance Marine with Maritime Raid Force, 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit, awaits the execution of a reconnaissance and surveillance mission during the MEU’s Realistic Urban Training exercise at Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, June 13, 2016. Reconnaissance and surveillance of an objective area allows the MEU commander to gain a greater understanding of the enemy’s presence and geographical details on the battlefield.

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Devan K. Gowans

Staff Sgt. Stephen Ferguson, a crew chief with Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 167, 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing, rides in the back of a UH-1Y Venom as it approaches a landing zone during a training exercise near Camp Lejeune, N.C., June 17, 2016. Familiarization flights familiarize pilots new to the unit with the different landing zones and flight procedures around the Camp Lejeune area.

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Aaron K. Fiala

COAST GUARD:

Members of Coast Guard Sector Juneau inspections division arrive at the cruise ship Crystal Serenity moored in Juneau, Alaska, to conduct a certificate of compliance exam June 22, 2016. The exam tests the crew’s ability to react in the case of an emergency covering a range of different scenarios.

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Jon-Paul Rios

The crew of the Coast Guard Cutter George Cobb stand ready for a uniform inspection prior to the cutter’s change of command ceremony held at Coast Guard Base Los Angeles-Long Beach on June 16, 2016. The change of command ceremony is a time-honored tradition, deeply rooted in Coast Guard and Naval history. The event signifies a total transfer of responsibility, authority and accountability of the command.

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Andrea Anderson

Articles

Trump’s vet endorsement came from a Super PAC disguised as a not-for-profit

On Tuesday, a Veteran’s group called Veterans for a Strong America (VSA) endorsed billionaire Donald Trump’s Presidential candidacy during a rally on board the decommissioned U.S.S. Iowa in San Pedro, California.


In a press release, Trump said, “I am honored to receive the endorsement of this fantastic group… If I win I am going to get our vets the care they need, treatment they deserve, and make America and our military great again!”

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy

Except details about this veterans group are not entirely clear. Founded in 2010, VSA is run by South Dakota lawyer Joel Arends, who says the organization doesn’t usually endorse a candidate until the general election but recognizes Trump as an “inherent leader capable of achieving mission success.”

What Trump can or can’t do is for American voters to decide, but the back story behind Veterans for a Strong America is a bit hazy.

The fundraiser on the battleship Iowa this week was ostensibly meant to be a fundraiser for the 501(c)4 VSA, which will “go towards helping Veterans for a Strong America supporting our warriors on and off the battlefield and not to any candidate or candidate’s committee.”

Except the nonprofit status of VSA has since been revoked for failure to file the IRS form 990 for three consecutive years. So, the money from the event will likely go to the VSA Super PAC, and thus, to Joel Arends, who as of last night, may have been the sole member of VSA.

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
Arends deployed to Iraq in 2004 and later served with the rank of Major in the Army Reserve. While in Iraq, he was awarded the Bronze Star for operations in and around Baghdad. So his veteran status is beyond reproach.

Though he did paint a rather rosy picture of the war in Iraq in 2006, telling a reporter from Sioux City, Iowa at the time that “Iraq is a place of great progress” and that “American troops in Baghdad won the locals’ hearts and minds,” with 14 of the 18 provinces “considered relatively peaceful.”

VSA is not a non-partisan group

The group dates back to at least 2012, when the left-leaning Mother Jones website ran an article about their attempt to “swift boat” Obama during the 2012 election.

“Swift Boating” is now a political term meant to surprise a candidate’s military record, either truthfully or not, by “Veterans” who may or may not be associated with the candidate. The term refers to the “Swift Boat Veterans for Truth” ad ran against John Kerry during the 2004 Presidential election. In the 2012 Mother Jones article, Arends made no bones about his group’s activities.

“Yes, it’s the swift boating of the president, in the sense of using what’s perceived to be his greatest strength and making it his greatest weakness,” which Arends meant as the Bin Laden raid.

Arends contends his group is nonpartisan, though he has a history of working for Republican candidates and causes, including as a field director for the Bush-Cheney campaign in 1999, as the Veteran’s Director in Iowa in 2007 for John McCain for President, and working to promote events for Rick Santorum and Newt Gingrich, according to his Facebook page. The group’s registration also lists it as a conservative action group, which means…

VSA is a Super PAC

Super PACs are the anonymous dark money receptacles that are a result of the Supreme Court’s Citizens United decision, allowing anyone to to donate unlimited sums to be distributed by these groups, as long as the candidate does not help coordinate how that money is spent.

In the 2012 election cycle, VSA spent all of the more than $170,000 it raised on Republican candidates during that time and some of it was spent against another Republican candidate. It also appears most of that money was donated to itself (VSA has a 501(c)4 “social welfare” nonprofit with the same name).

The VSA Super PAC spent more than it brought in, ending the election $14,000 in the red. Where that money came from is not known, but what is known is before last night’s endorsement/Trump fundraiser, VSA had $30 in cash and $318 in debts.

When looking up the domain owner for VSA’s website, www.veteransforastrongamerica.org, we found it was registered to DomainsByProxy.com, a GoDaddy site which gained notoriety in the 2012 elections for allowing political entities to pay to hide the owners of certain websites.

Interestingly enough, VSA claims membership numbers that include its over 57,000 Facebook fans and “500k grassroots.” It’s a bit of a stretch to claim a Facebook fan as a “member,” since it could be practically anyone who just wants to learn more about VSA and clicks “like.” The grassroots membership claim comes from a Sep. 1 press release that claims “500,000 supporters nationwide.”

We have reached out to VSA and will update if we hear back.

NOW: Sorry, General Mattis won’t be running for President

OR: Which US President was the greatest military leader

Articles

Fox Nation creates history of tattoo show hosted by service disabled, badass Marine veteran

When Fox Nation decided to create USA Ink to explore the timeless history and art of tattooing, they knew just who could host it: a Marine, of course. 

Retired Marine Corps Staff Sgt. Johnny Joey Jones is no stranger to the Fox Television Network or tattoos and he has been a contributor for Fox News since 2019. He’s also the host of their popular hunting show Fox Nation Outdoors which airs on their streaming service. But Jones’ journey to a career in television is nothing short of extraordinary.

The Georgia native tried attending college after graduating high school but it just wasn’t for him, he said. He made the decision to enlist in the Marine Corps and Jones said he was changed down to his core. “You quit thinking ‘Can I do this?’ and start thinking ‘Let me do this.'” he said. 

Jones deployed to Iraq not long after he became a Marine and it was there he decided he wanted to become an EOD Technician. In August 2010, Jones deployed once again, this time to Afghanistan. It was his job to find and dispose of improvised explosive devices. They found about 50 of them over their first five days in Safar, Afghanistan’s Helmand Province.

Initially, their sixth day searching a bazaar in Safar came up empty, other than finding bomb making materials. After taking a breather and readjusting the 110 pounds of gear he was wearing, Jones stepped right, unknowingly right onto an IED. 

“I try not to spend too much on my service story because there’s thousands of us who have lost legs like I did or worse,” Jones said. Staff Sgt. Eric Chir was injured by the flying shrapnel from the IED blast and Cpl. Daniel Greer, a Marine reservist and firefighter, would eventually lose his life due to brain trauma. 

Jones said during his recovery at Walter Reed he knew he’d need to find a new path, since he knew his days of dismantling bombs for the Marine Corps were over. He was challenged to be open about his story and use it to create a new purpose.  

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
Jones on his wedding day in 2012. Photo provided by Fox News.

After completing his medical recovery, he enrolled in Georgetown University. Jones then earned his own internship by continually showing up on Capitol Hill and introducing himself to members of Congress. His continual discussions about veteran issues and persistence paid off, creating significant policy change for wounded service members. 

President Obama even invited him to the White House. 

After being deployed to Afghanistan, Jones reconnected with his high school sweetheart. They married while he was attending college and winning the hearts of congressional members everywhere. After graduating with his bachelor’s degree in 2014, he dove into nonprofit work with Boot Campaign as their chief operating officer in Texas.

Through his years of experience on Capitol Hill, policy work and speaking engagements, Jones said he was feeling good. “That’s what’s cool about it…there’s so many of us who have served in this war and we’re still out there doing everything,” he said.

His everything led to a small role in a movie and eventually, Fox. “That’s a good bucket to pull from if you are going to go on national television to talk about issues that either divide people or people just have a hard time understanding. All of that prepared me and then Fox opened the door,” he said. 

Although you will often see Jones contributing to political or news-related discussions on Fox News, he’s even more passionate about Fox Nation and the variety of programming the network has created through their streaming service. “The first opportunity was Fox Nation Outdoors which is my hunting show and then this came through. I just fell in love with this concept,” he shared. 

Tattoos have been around for over 5,000 years. On USA Ink, Jones introduces viewers to “Iceman,” the 5,200 year old mummy with some incredibly impressive and long lasting ink. Despite popular assumption of tattoos in the military being a relatively new phenomenon, the practice actually took root during the Revolutionary War

When the British continually disregarded sailors’ citizenship papers, they began inking their personal identification information on their bodies. They did this to prevent illegal recruitment into service. Although our armed forces no longer have to worry about that, tattoos have evolved and become so much more than identifying markers. 

By the 1900s, it was illegal in some cities and done underground. “The purpose of the show is to show the history of tattoos in America but do so in a way that shows how society has changed to accept tattoos,” Jones said. 

Tattoos are now utilized alongside advanced medical technology and a prevalent part of American culture. The practice has also become a source of healing and storytelling for those wearing them. This is especially true for our Armed Forces. 

“Tattoos in the military have had this love/hate relationship. The people serving in the military love them but the people in charge of the military do not,” Jones said with a laugh. “The place that tattoos hold in our lives as service members and warriors, I think leadership needs to understand that.”

Jones’ entire left arm is dedicated to those he’s lost during various operations of the ongoing War on Terror. “I put those on my skin so they don’t fester in my heart,” he explained. 

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
Image posted on Jones’ Instagram and shared with permission. Jones wrote the following post about this tattoo: “Gunnery Sergeant Floyd Holley was a mentor and a friend. He and I met briefly in Hawaii when I was there (06-08) but were on opposite deployment cycles. He was already an EOD tech and when I graduated EOD school and got to 1st EOD at Camp P we took right up with @jebidiah535 with shared passions. When we got screwed by a blue falcon the thanksgiving before our deployment he had me over to eat with his family. On deployment we were 2 of 6 techs charged with taking Safar Bazaar. The night before we left out he told me “it doesn’t matter how many IEDs you do, 1 or 100 you’re a tech. Don’t go chasing them” we also spoke of his unborn baby girl and my 1yr old son waiting on me at home. (That convo is for us). Floyd was killed in action a few weeks after I lost my legs working my AO. A hero in every aspect of the word he was a father when he didn’t have to be, a husband worthy of emulating and a loyal friend. He was what we all strive to be. Love you Mr. Incredible!”

Another unexpected cool part of the show? Viewers will get to watch the process of Jones’ getting a tattoo by another veteran throughout the five-episode series. 

Before doing USA Ink, he had his own assumptions about tattoos in certain areas of the body. His experience filming the show changed him. “Doing the show really caused me to pause and think…if tattoos are one of the places where we misjudge people, what are all the others? Could tattoos be the place where we could really learn about people?” he said. 

It’s that thought provoking approach that is driving Fox Nation programming, Jones explained. “It is a genuine attempt to connect with folks beyond the things that divide us and instead the things that make us who we are…I just think that’s amazing.”

From now until May 31, 2021 Fox Nation is completely free to active military and veterans as a part of Fox’s Grateful Nation initiative in honor of Memorial Day. USA Ink will debut on May 28, 2021. Click here to grab your free year of streaming.

popular

This top-secret jet bomber spied on Americans in Normandy

Allied troops on the beaches of Normandy got a shocking view of the future of warfare in 1944 when, as they were moving supplies from ships to the shore, a jet-powered, Nazi bomber ripped past at approximately 460 mph.


The Arado Ar 234 was the first operational jet bomber and flew at up to 540 miles per hour, so quick that no Allied fighter could match it without going into a dive.

In fact, one flight of P47 Thunderbolts spotted a flight of three Ar 234s 10,000 feet below them in 1945 and attempted to use the Thunderbolt’s high dive speeds for an attack run. The Nazi pilots waited until the Americans had almost reached them and then tore away at full speed as the P-47s coughed on their smoke.

For the air crews assigned to protect the American forces landing supplies in Normandy in August 1944, attacking the Arado was essentially impossible. Loaded with reconnaissance gear, it flew over the beaches at 460 mph while taking a photo every 11 seconds.

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
The only known surviving Arado Ar 234 Blitz aircraft now rests at the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum. (Photo: Michael Yew CC BY 2.0)

At that speed, it could fly over all five original D-Day beaches in less than eight minutes. By the time that fighter aircraft made it into the air to hunt the Arado down, it would already be long gone.

That didn’t quite make the Arado invincible, though. Like the slightly slower British de Havilland Mosquito, a prop-driven British bomber and reconnaissance aircraft that go its speed from its light weight, the Ar 234 was left vulnerable when it was forced to maneuver or slow down for bombing runs.

 

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
The P-51 is one of the only aircraft to shoot down an Arado Ar 234 in flight. It did so thanks to a group of P-47 Thunderbolts that forced the jet-powered bomber into a speed-bleeding turn. (Photo: U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Philip Bryant)

One of the only Ar 234s ever shot down was caught because it was forced into a sharp turn while coming out of a bombing run.

A group of German jets were bombing Allied bridges on the Rhine when a group of American P-47s came at them. The German jets took a tight turn to avoid the P-47s, losing so much speed that they were left vulnerable. American Capt. Don Bryan was in a P-51 nearby and was able to position himself so that the turning German planes had to fly just underneath him.

 

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
Republic P-47C-2-RE Thunderbolts of the 61st Fighter Squadron, 56th Fighter Group. (Photo: U.S. Army Air Force)

Bryan made his attack in a dive which allowed his Mustang to keep up with the German jet while his .50-cal machine guns chewed through the Arado’s right engine. The German pilot was left without momentum, without adequate engine power, and with too little altitude. He went down with his jet.

Adolf Hitler considered the Ar 234 one of his wonder weapons that would save Germany, but it suffered from a number of shortcomings. First, the fragile engines needed an overhaul after every ten hours of flight and were replaced after 25. The jet also needed long runways and large amounts of fuel, two things that were hard for a Luftwaffe on the retreat to provide with regularity.

 

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
An Arado Ar 234B bomber sits in a captured hangar with Junkers Ju 88G. (Photo: U.S. Army)

In the end, the jets were sent on just a few operational missions. The Normandy reconnaissance was the first, and they also did duty over the Ardennes during the Battle of the Bulge and in the final defense of Germany, flying first against the bridges over the Rhine and later against Soviet troop concentrations.

The only surviving Ar 234 is in the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum.

Articles

High school teacher made honorary Army recruiter

Kings Mountain High School teacher Hailey Spearman was made an honorary recruiter for the Shelby Army Recruiting Center at a ceremony on Fort Jackson, S.C. on April 22.


Spearman attended a Future Soldier event with her local Shelby recruiter, Staff Sgt. Casey Raza, and some of her students who have joined the U.S. Army this school year. They received first-hand experience of what Army basic training entails.

Spearman teaches English Language Arts and coaches the women’s track and field team at KMHS.

Today in military history: D-Day — Allies land in Normandy
Back row left to right: Army Future Soldier Malachi Wingate, Shelby Army Recruiter Staff Sgt. Casey Raza, U.S. Army Recruiting Battalion Command Sgt. Maj. Thomas McEwen and Asheville Company. Commander Capt. William Rivers. Front row left to right: Shelby Army Recruiting Center Leader Sgt. First Class David Lee, Army Future Soldier Tatiana Phillips, Ja’Myiah Pressley, who is interested in joining the Army, Army Future Soldier Alleya Roberts, Kings Mountain teacher Hailey Spearman and U.S. Army Recruiting Battalion Lt. Col. Robert Garbarino. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Jason Westfall)

Lt. Col. Robert Garbarino, U.S. Army Recruiting Battalion Columbia Commander, said both teacher and recruiter work together to help students find their options for life after high school.

“Ms. Spearman is a model for what a community advocate does for our recruiting efforts,” Garbarino said.

He deputized her by giving her his Army Recruiting Badge in front of over 250 Future Soldiers and their guests. He also presented her with a plaque to thank her for her efforts to promote awareness on Army opportunities. Garbarino said he was pleased to recognize Spearman after hearing how she goes the extra mile for her students.

Raza said that Spearman has been instrumental to the process.

“I wanted to reach as many students as possible to show them all of their options,” Raza said. “She allowed me to give presentations during her English classes and to students who are on her track team.”

Spearman said Raza puts the needs of each student first.

“She has a way of building positive relationships with students and therefore, our students look up to her and respect her opinions concerning the Army,” Spearman said.

Do Not Sell My Personal Information