The prequel reveal in 'Mandalorian' Season 2 Episode 4 will trigger you - We Are The Mighty
MIGHTY MOVIES

The prequel reveal in ‘Mandalorian’ Season 2 Episode 4 will trigger you

Spoiler alert: It’s midi-chlorians. 

But really, spoilers for The Mandalorian Chapter 12 ahead.

Let’s start with a bit of non-linear history. In the first season of The Mandalorian, we were introduced to the Yoda Baby — an “asset” sought out by the remnants of the Galactic Empire under the orders of Moff Gideon (Giancarlo Esposito). We knew Gideon and his scientist Dr. Pershing (Omid Abtahi) were using the child for experiments and we knew of course that the Yoda Baby has a powerful affinity for the Force, but we didn’t know what the connection was.

Until now. 

Let’s jump to the beginning of The Siege, shall we? Din Djarin and his little charge are working to repair the Razor Crest. Djarin’s got the Yoda Baby in a small compartment trying to re-work some electrical lines. This had me wondering, from a cognitive perspective, how old the Yoda Baby is meant to be here. I know he’s fifty years old (and we know that Yoda lived to be nearly 900 years old) but what’s the age that you would try having your kid accomplish a dangerous task where he can sort of understand your directions but not completely and he can’t speak yet? I’m not a parent, but, like, is this like dealing with a two year-old?

All hail Ponda Baba, the OG ballsack alien. (Star Wars: A New Hope)

Anyway, after electrocuting the infant they realize they need some help so they head back to Nevarro. We meet some ballsack aliens Aqualish thugs gearing up to murder a cute alien muskrat. Luckily Cara Dune — Nevarro’s new Marshal — returns in time to save the little feller.

Dune and Greef Karga (Carl Weathers, also the director of this episode) have a little side-mission for Djarin while he waits for his ship repairs: they want his help in destroying a nearby Imperial base. (My Dungeon Master pointed out that each episode of The Mandalorian is like a DND session and it made perfect sense. I think that’s also the series’ greatest struggle — the connecting lore isn’t quite strong enough to throw us all around the galaxy with random characters and missions.)

They leave the yoda baby with the other school children (which basically just endangers the other children, right? When has the yoda baby literally EVER not been attacked?) and we are given some new Yoda Baby meme-fuel when he steals a kid’s macaron. Plus now we can eat macarons at Star Wars parties.

This is also how I look when I steal your dessert. (The Mandalorian | Disney+)

Djarin, Dune, Karga, and Mythrol (Horatio Sanz), who was once a target for Djarin and is now an indentured servant of Karga — and the butt of too many bad jokes — head off to the base. Thanks to The Rise of Skywalker, every time I see Stormtroopers die, I wonder if they’re child soldiers. I still hate that JJ Abrams did that to me. Gina Carano’s gleeful little cheers whenever she kills one don’t help.

So here we are back to the controversial little midi-chlorians, introduced to aghast Star Wars fans during The Phantom Menace. The higher a creature’s “m-count,” the more Force-sensitive they are. Here at the base, which turns out to be a laboratory, we learn that Pershing desired the Yoda Baby for his high m-count in order to conduct his experiments.

Is that a Snoke, though? (Mandalorian | Disney+)

It looks like Moff Gideon is trying to create a unit of Force-sensitive combatants, which is why he’s so eager to recover the Yoda Baby. After a very Star Wars-y canyon chase and TIE Fighter aerial battle (seriously, how amazing is Star Wars sound design? TIE Fighters sound so cool and distinct), the remaining Imperials are defeated and all is well.

The final scenes reunite us with New Republic pilot Captain Carson Teva (Paul Sun-Hyung Lee), who attempts to recruit Dune to the cause, and introduce us to a new adversary, an Imperial Comms officer (Katy M. O’Brian) who ordered a tracking beacon attached to Djarin’s Razor Crest.

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MIGHTY MOVIES

An exclusive interview with ‘The Liberator’ creator and Executive Producer, Jeb Stuart

Jeb Stuart has been a motion picture and television screenwriter, director and producer for over 30 years, and is widely considered one of the great action screenwriters in film history. His first film, Die Hard, was nominated for four Academy Awards and voted the Best Action Film of All Time by Entertainment Weekly (2007). In a 2012 New York Times Magazine article, Adam Sternbergh wrote: “As a genre, the American action film…produced one bone fide masterpiece, Die Hard.” In 1993, Stuart’s suspense thriller, The Fugitive, was nominated for seven Academy Awards including Best Picture. During his career he has worked on over 50 feature and television projects, which have collectively grossed over $2.5 billion dollars worldwide. 

Presently, he is the creator and showrunner of two Netflix Original series, The Liberator, a World War Two drama slated for release in the fall of 2020 and Vikings: Vahalla which is currently in production in Ireland. Stuart is a WGA Best Screenplay Nominee as well as a two-time Edgar Allen Poe Nominee for best movie screenplay. He has received recognition for his writing from the American Film Institute and is a recipient of the Nicholl Screenwriting Fellowship, administered by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, of which he has been a member for over 25 years. Stuart received a B.A. and M.A. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a M.A. in Communications from Stanford University. He is a former member of the graduate faculty at Northwestern University, where he taught in the Writing for Stage and Screen Program. WATM had the chance to sit down with Stuart to hear more about The Liberator. 

(A&E)

WATM: History is full of stories of courage and uncommon valor; how did this story grab your attention to decide that it must be made?

Stuart: The Liberator is based on the book written by Alex Kershaw. It was sent to me by Michael Lynne whose company Unique Features was working on a World War II project for the History Channel. I’m a huge reader, especially U.S. military history, and I thought this would be a great story for a couple of reasons: It deals with Italy primarily and it doesn’t get enough coverage in film and TV. It shows our troops learning to fight instead of the great battles such as D-Day and the French invasion that we know pretty well. 

The biggest issue for me, that I was really attracted to, was the diversity part of the story. That a group of native Americans, White cowboys and Mexican Americans could be brought together in an integrated unit in WWII. That really got my attention. The idea that Felix Sparks, a back-office 2nd lieutenant, who works his way up to Lt. Colonel over the course of 500 days is a pretty compelling story within itself. It’s a survivor story and of terrific leadership. That was the start and there was a lot after that but that drew my interest in the story.

WATM: What was your favorite character-building moment in the story?

Stuart: That’s a great question, Ruddy. You know, there are so many moments like that. I think my favorite moments are when the men are really having to pull together in combat situations. Anzio comes to mind, I wanted to tell a story that can show G.I.s under artillery. For most people watching this [war series], I was wondering if there was a way to capture the terrifying aspect of being in a foxhole under bombardment for minutes by the German 8.8 [cm] artillery that was just fearsome. 

We were able to do that with Trioscope. What it would feel like is not knowing where a shell would come down, then having American artillery corresponding, going over your head and raining down on your position in order to complete the task – guard the only road into Anzio. Should the Germans capture it, they would have a blank check to move support vehicles and tanks into Anzio. They probably would have driven the Allies back into the sea. 

So, this one unit is tasked with holding that road. An incredibly complex task that they should have been overwhelmed by. By pulling the chain as they do in episode two, by putting their own artillery down on themselves, they were able to stop the German advance long enough for the Americans to have a grasp on Anzio and counterattack. 

They did win the Presidential Unit Citation Award, which at the time was pretty new. Very few units have ever received that. That’s my favorite character-building moment for the series. 

(A&E)

WATM: Warfare is organized chaos, while in production, what was a moment that you experienced your team pulling together and getting the mission done?

Stuart: In that same episode after the Anzio battle, Spark’s unit had to move into a series of places called The Caves. Where these rag tagged pieces of units that were still left, took refuge in this circular mound that they had done more excavation. It was probably more of a mine than a cave and there were civilians in there. 

For me, that was the place where they gathered up. Having to recreate this, the audience will see a functioning Trioscope. Trioscope is a hybrid type of animation – we shot the show on a blue screen. When we cast out there, things like leaving the cave and going out into this bombardment under machine gun fire, all have to be imagined by the actor. It calls upon the actor to bring more to the table otherwise it’s just not going to have the feel. What we did a lot of the time is that Grzegorz Jonkajtys, our director, and L.C. Crowley, our producer back in Atlanta, they would put ear pieces into the soldier’s ears that they would pump in machine gun fire from the right or explosion is coming in or you hear the whistle of incoming shells.

After a couple of takes, Ruddy, (laughs) it doesn’t take long for an actor to suddenly start thinking ‘where is that coming from? How am I going to react?’ and they would react naturally. If a shell is coming you just get down, if a foxhole is available you get in, especially when it’s 20 feet from you. 

It’s incredibly disorienting for the actor, as it should be, as you’ve said organized chaos. It should shock you; it should surprise you. That fight or flight instinct and adrenaline pumping in and you react that way. I think it was an extremely successful experiment that worked for us. 

WATM: The military audience is always hungry for more, more, and more. They will watch content a million times over and always ask ‘what’s next?’

 Stuart: I am hoping what you’re saying is a follow up to The Liberator using Trioscope in another conflict such as WWI, Gulf War, Vietnam.

(A&E)

WATM: Yes, absolutely.

Stuart: It is great for this type of format. I hope we can do an anthology series which would be fun because trioscope allows us to recreate great battles, great units, great servicemen, great stories like that. You obviously need the great assets that go only with it like terrific directors and great animators. If you think of WWI and WWII, none of those tanks and planes really operate or exist today outside of museums and private collections. 

You couldn’t mount a show of any scale like you could in the 50’s and 60’s like Dirty Dozen or along those lines. You couldn’t do those kinds of things without recreating [vehicles] from scratch. This is an opportunity to find great soldier stories and tell them in a very convincing, authentic way through Trioscope, A+E Studios and School of Humans, and I have been in talks about what we can do together.

WATM: Is there anything that you would like to say to the military audience?

Stuart: The one thing I would like to really tell your audience at We Are The Mighty is that The Liberator has a terrific message but also just great entertainment. It’s the type of thing where everybody who is involved thought it was a very special project. It tells an important part of our military history. 

The veterans I’ve talked to, not just Vietnam veterans – my father was a WWII veteran, veterans of the Gulf War and such; the mental endurance that’s required to get through something like that are just as important today as they were 75 years ago. I think there is a lot of resonance in the story and we’re excited about it, we’re proud of it, and I hope people will tune in and watch it.The Liberator Premieres Veterans Day November 11, 2020 on Netflix.

MIGHTY MOVIES

‘Game of Thrones’ composer reveals last season’s music secrets

Composer Ramin Djawadi had a formidable task ahead of him for the final season of “Game of Thrones.” Back when he was working on the seventh season in 2017, Djawadi didn’t know his music written for Jon and Dany would also need to play right as Jon Snow plunged a dagger into Daenerys’ heart.

Showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss had “talked a little bit in riddles” about Dany’s fate and the music Djawadi needed to write, the composer said in an interview with INSIDER on June 11, 2019.

“They said, ‘OK, this needs to be a really romantic theme, but make sure that it’s a love theme that can imply complications,'” Djawadi said. “That’s how they started me out. They said things turn differently and things go wrong.”


Their love “theme” (the term Djawadi uses to refer to the melody unique to a character’s scenes that you can hear on the soundtrack) was worked into a track on the season eight score called “The Iron Throne.”

The prequel reveal in ‘Mandalorian’ Season 2 Episode 4 will trigger you

Daenerys and Jon embracing just before her death.

(HBO)

The song played just as Jon and Dany kissed, mimicking the way she believed they were going to have a happy ending. But it was cut short, right as Jon stabbed his queen. Djawadi says “The Iron Throne” is one of the songs he’s most looking forward to playing live later this year when the “Game of Thrones Live Concert Experience” goes on tour.

Keep scrolling to read INSIDER’s full interview with Djawadi, in which he reveals the “positive” message of the final scene with Jon Snow.

Kim Renfro: The final song heard on the show, called “A Song of Ice and Fire,” is obviously such an important endcap to the series. What were the emotions that you wanted baked into that particular track?

Ramin Djawadi: The thought was to really create a bookend to the whole show. We have our main title song that really represents everybody and the entire series, and we thought there’s no better way to end the show than with our main title theme. But this time it was with a full choir. We have men and women and children actually singing it.

The prequel reveal in ‘Mandalorian’ Season 2 Episode 4 will trigger you

Jon leading the remaining wildlings beyond the Wall.

(HBO)

We’ve heard that main title so many times at every beginning of the episode, so we wanted to leave the show with that — including the very last note on our small dulcimer [instrument]. The main title ends when the title card goes to black and they have that little “dum dum ba ba bum bum” on the dulcimer, and those are the same last notes people will hear on the show.

Renfro: Did you have any conversations with showrunners David Benioff and D. B. Weiss about what is going on with Jon specifically? I feel like the shows ends on this optimistic note, where he’s half-smiling and there are children around him. The children’s presence felt really important in that scene, because it’s this mark of the future and possibility. At the same time it’s a little sad, because he’s going into exile, basically, and leaving behind his past life. Were there conversations about that?

Djawadi: Yeah, absolutely. The idea is really that he stops and he looks back, and then the main title starts, and it’s the idea of a new beginning. It’s supposed to be positive and yeah, like you said, the fact that there are children around and [other] people — he’s not just by himself.

The prequel reveal in ‘Mandalorian’ Season 2 Episode 4 will trigger you

Jon taking one last look at Castle Black before heading into the North.

(HBO)

Djawadi [continued]: Originally [he was] with the Night’s Watch, and you’re not allowed to have a wife and children and all that, but this is him going out there with the wildlings, and you can interpret it like he’s starting a new life. He’s a changed man, and he’s leaving the past behind, and so it’s definitely supposed to be something positive. There are many possibilities now — that’s how we can look at it.

Renfro: I’d to talk about Brienne and Jamie, and the music you wrote for their important scenes. How did you approach that aspect of season eight, and especially the romantic element with both of them?

Djawadi: What’s interesting is their theme together came out of what I call the “Honor Theme” […] over the seasons, when they met and the way they treated each other, it was always an honorable theme. So that became their music. And the other big scene which I loved so much there, when she gets knighted, it was used there, and then, yeah, then we basically every time, I’m pretty certain with the development of their relationship, their theme was playing.

[Editor’s note: Djawadi’s reference to the “Honor Theme” is likely a melody heard on the season three song “Kingslayer,” as well as season eight’s “A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms.”]

The prequel reveal in ‘Mandalorian’ Season 2 Episode 4 will trigger you

Jaime and Brienne didn’t get their happy ending.

(HBO)

Renfro: Some people noticed that the melody for “The White Book”has echoes of the season two track “I Am Hers, She Is Mine,” which was what played when Robb and Talisa got married.

Djawadi: Yeah, I was going to get to that [laughing]. I just threw that in there because I thought it would be a subtle nod to their relationship. When she sits there and she thinks about him and writes down all the things he had done, the second half is the ‘Honor’ theme, but yeah a big chunk of that [song] is the wedding theme.

It’s just a hint of what their relationship — if they had stayed together, if he was still alive — what it could have been. What they could have become. That’s why I put that in there. I was amazed some people picked up on it. I was hoping people would go, ‘Wait a minute, that’s from season two.’ And that was exactly my intent. I thought it would be very appropriate.

Renfro: People absolutely loved that. A lot of fans were so attached to their relationship, and I think that it was really special to get a hint at that dream. Like Jaime and Brienne could have been married in some alternate timeline.

The prequel reveal in ‘Mandalorian’ Season 2 Episode 4 will trigger you

Brienne writing down Jaime’s deeds in the White Book.

(HBO)

Djawadi: Exactly. That was exactly my intention. It just shows the power of music, right? There were no words [in that scene] but by putting that in there your imagination goes [into] where this could have gone. I wanted people to have that emotion, and have those thoughts. I’m glad it was picked up.

Renfro: What was the most challenging scene to write music for this season?

Djawadi: I find almost everything challenging [laughing]. I guess maybe “The Night King.” I definitely knew that I wanted to really try to wrap up [on the show] things nicely with all the themes that we know and have come to love, so there were opportunities for that, but there were opportunities for new things.

Obviously “The Night King” theme was our big new theme this season, and writing that piece was challenging in many ways. One is because we decided to for the second time in “Game of Thrones” history to really focus on the piano again. We felt this was an opportunity to have a big piano piece, and we wanted to call back to “Light of the Seven.”

Game of Thrones S8 – The Night King – Ramin Djawadi (Official Video)

www.youtube.com

Djawadi [continued]: But then of course I had to reinvent myself, and here I was, thinking, “OK, how can I beat myself? I need to have something that has the same impact at this particular moment on the show and call back to ‘Light of the Seven,’ but it can’t be the same piece.”

If I had done an arrangement of “Light of the Seven” again it wouldn’t have made any sense. Cersei was nowhere to be seen, and that piece belongs to Cersei. But it was a very long scene, just like “Light of the Seven.” There were a lot of similarities, so I definitely made a connection [between them]. For example, I end up in the same key and tempo as the “Light of the Seven” by the end of “The Night King.”

But I also [wrote it knowing] when the piano drops people would sit up and go, “Oh, piano’s coming. This means something’s happening now. What’s going on here?” And the idea was that it would have the reverse effect. That you’d see the Night King on his final march towards Bran, and you’d think back to the Cersei theme and that this is all going his way and he’s going to win and it’s over.

We just had 50 minutes of action music and battle and they tried and tried, and they just can’t do it. It was supposed to feel like a finale and that they were all going to die. And then of course the big surprise happens at the end.

The prequel reveal in ‘Mandalorian’ Season 2 Episode 4 will trigger you

Arya surprised everyone when she killed the Night King.

(HBO)

Renfro: I know for past seasons there were times when Benioff and Weiss would give you some advance notice of an arc that was coming, because you needed to start planting those musical themes a little bit sooner. Did you have any advance notice that Dany was going to die, or that she was going to have this kind of turn at the end? The theme you used for her and Jon, called “Truth” on the season seven score, comes back into play right as she’s dying. Did you know when you wrote it that it was going to be a part of her death?

Djawadi: They showed me this season very early, earlier than any other season. But they weren’t that specific about Dany dying back in season seven. We’ve had such a good working relationship; they always give me exactly the information I need to know at the time.

When I wrote [Jon and Dany’s] theme, they said, “OK, this needs to be a really romantic theme, but make sure that it’s a love theme that can imply complications.” That’s how they started me out. They said things turn differently and things go wrong […] they talked a little bit in riddles.

To be honest, I never even thought about who was going to die, but I just took it as, “I need to write a love theme that has some drama to it, that can show complications.” That’s really the word they used, that things will go wrong and [it’s] “complicated.” That word gave me enough information.

The prequel reveal in ‘Mandalorian’ Season 2 Episode 4 will trigger you

The Jon and Daenerys love theme played during their season seven finale sex scene.

(HBO)

Renfro: So the “Game of Thrones Live Concert Experience” is coming back. I’m super excited. I live in LA now, so I get to go to the Hollywood Bowl version. What made you decided to go with an outdoor/amphitheater vibe versus in the indoor arena setup from the past two iterations?

Djawadi: We just want to try different things. The Hollywood Bowl is a historic venue, and performing there has been on my bucket list. With venues like the Hollywood Bowl and others in all the different cities, these outdoor concerts can be very special. It’s just another way of performing it, and obviously the stage brings different challenges by being outside, but it’s exciting.

I’m actually really majorly reworking [the show] right now, because there’s so much material from season eight — we could have done a concert just with season eight alone. I’m trying to keep a cohesive story from seasons one through eight, which is tricky because I only have that limited amount of time. It’s exciting that I have choices, which is great. So I’m in the process of doing that right now. I can’t wait. Hollywood Bowl will be amazing.

Renfro: Is there a particular part of season eight you’re most excited to perform live for people?

Djawadi: Well, of course “The Night King” because it’s just a great set piece, and it’ll be fun and exciting to perform. And another one, I have to say, is actually [“The Iron Throne”]. It’ll be in there in one way or another. That’s the theme from when Dany dies, and it was such an emotional scene for me to write. I’m just really attached to it. I think it’s such a powerful scene, with Drogon, and so that piece is just special to me. I’m very excited to play that live with an orchestra.

Renfro: Well, I can’t wait to see it. Thank you for bringing all this music to life, and congratulations on finishing out this series. It’s really incredible that it’s come all this way, and that you’ve been there from the start.

Djawadi: Thank you. I think it still hasn’t caught up with me fully that [it’s over]. The live concert tour is helping me with it, because I just don’t want to let go, just how many fans probably don’t want to let go of the show. It helps me to still be working on the music and just stay in that world longer.

And yes, looking back it’s crazy when I think of how this all started out in 2011. And now with the concert tour, all this music that I’ve written and just going through it, I feel very lucky that I’ve been part of this. It’s been unbelievable.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity. You can find dates and ticket info for the “Game of Thrones: Live Concert Experience” here.

This article originally appeared on Insider. Follow @thisisinsider on Twitter.

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How the US Army responded to internet claim that Captain America was owed $3 million in back pay

A fan on Reddit once calculated that the US government would owe Captain America more than $3 million in back pay if the events in the Marvel Universe were real.


A US Army spokesman told INSIDER that the fan had a point but that calculating the exact dollar amount isn’t so simple.

Here’s the backstory.

After defeating Hydra in World War II, Captain America was lost in the Arctic north from 1945 to 2011. During those six decades on ice, he was never technically discharged. As a result (the theory goes), the government owes him payment for those 66 years of service.

Redditor Anon33249038 crunched the numbers and concluded that the First Avenger is entitled to $3,154,619.52, adjusting for inflation.

The analysis factors in the Army’s 1945 pay grade, biannual raises, and how long Cap spent on ice before he returned to active duty in 2011 at the start of “The Avengers.”

Wayne Hall, an Army spokesman, says there’s more to it than that.

“If Capt. Steve Rogers (aka Captain America) were not a fictional character and the circumstances surrounding his disappearance and recovery actually real, he may actually be entitled to receive back pay,” Hall told INSIDER in an email. “However, a wide variety of variables would have to be taken into consideration to actually calculate the true amount of back pay to which he would be entitled to receive; given that he is a fictional character we cannot truly capture all of those variables accurately.”

Hall went on to say that the Redditor had some of his facts wrong.

“Yes, it is correct that the O-3 (Army captain) pay grade in 1945 was $313.50; however it was a monthly pay rate vs. quarterly as the original poster indicated.”

The fan theory also “misinterpreted military pay scales” when arriving at the figure for the biannual increase of pay, Hall said, and failed to take in “any potential promotions that may have been bestowed upon Rogers while he was listed in a ‘Missing’ status.”

Whatever the final amount of back pay the government would owe Captain America for his decades of service, it’s almost certain that he would still have way less money than Tony Stark.

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9 awesome military movie scenes no soldier actually gets to do

Military movies are a lot of fun, and the Department of Defense loves how they prime plenty of young folks to join the service. But while military service and military movies are both great, there’s a huge gap between how military life is portrayed and how it actually works. So, here are nine scenes from military movies that are fun to watch but few troops ever get the chance to do:


The prequel reveal in ‘Mandalorian’ Season 2 Episode 4 will trigger you
This poor man hasn’t had a peaceful cup of coffee since the ’90s. (YouTube/ Paramount Pictures)

 

Buzzing the deck or tower

Yeah! “Top Gun!” And not the beach scene that makes our sisters act weird for 20 minutes afterward! But if you’re thinking about joining naval aviation in order to fly super fast past control towers on ship and shore, you should probably know that the beach scene is more likely to happen (but much less sexy) than “buzzing the tower” against orders.

See, F-14 Tomcats cost about $38 million each. So, pilots taking dangerous risks with their birds weren’t told off by an angry commander, they were investigated and had their wings taken away. And “Top Gun” is a school, and the commander definitely should’ve had some pilots ready to go to school besides the one who keeps taking unnecessary gambles with aircraft.

The prequel reveal in ‘Mandalorian’ Season 2 Episode 4 will trigger you
Do not let this sexy archaeologist select your cup. She chooses poorly. (YouTube/ Universal Pictures)

 

Hunt for lost technology with sexy archaeologists

In “The Mummy,” another awesome Tom Cruise flick, the hero is an elite soldier who, after a series of illegal mishaps, finds himself searching a tomb with a sexy archaeologist. The Nazi soldiers in “Indiana Jones” also spend a lot of time in ruins with sexy archaeologists (I’m talking about Dr. Elsa Schneider, but if you’re into Dr. René Emile Belloq, go for it).

But actually, modern military weapons typically come from laboratories, not ancient ruins. And the number of entombed monsters the Air Force is sent to re-secure like in “The Mummy” is also shockingly low. You’ll spend much more time in smelly port-a-johns with a smartphone than you will in Egypt with models.

Tell off scientists for being too science-y

But about that weapons-coming-out-of-labs thing from the last paragraph — plenty of movies also show soldiers running into academics and being all superior because the soldiers are brave and covered in muscles and the scientists are pencil necks. For those of you lucky enough to have forgotten the 1998 “Godzilla,” the military ignores about 30 warnings that Godzilla may have laid eggs.

But scientists aren’t actually assigned to combat units very often. And the few scientists who do end up with military units aren’t typically biologists tracking the local zombie outbreaks that you can laugh off until you get bit. They’re usually anthropologists telling you that the local Afghans don’t like you much, mostly because of all the shooting. Thanks, scientists!

The prequel reveal in ‘Mandalorian’ Season 2 Episode 4 will trigger you
Alien invasions aren’t real. And if they ever are, pray the aliens don’t have miles-wide aircraft carriers. (YouTube/ 20th Century Fox)

 

Fight aliens 

We loved “Independence Day” and hated “Battlefield: LA” as much as the next guy but, and brace yourselves here, aliens have never invaded Earth, and that’s not what the Space Force is for. Offensive wars against aliens don’t happen much either. We won’t be mining unobtanium from Pandora.

I know, big shocker. You might get to work against the “immigrant” form of aliens, but that’s mostly putting up barbed wire and providing medical aid while you sit in the middle of the desert during Christmas. So, I guess what we’re saying is: weigh your options.

The prequel reveal in ‘Mandalorian’ Season 2 Episode 4 will trigger you
Pictured: Coolest way to kill a giant bug. (TriStar Pictures)

 

Slaughtering bug armies

The best kinds of armies, alien or otherwise, to kill are easily bug armies and zombies. So much killing, so much gore, so little moral squeamishness. No one worries much about the bugs in “Starship Troopers,” even when heroes are climbing on top of them, shooting a hole through their exoskeletons, and then throwing a grenade inside of them.

(So cool.)

Sigh. Unfortunately for die-hard action fans, American forces actually spend most of their time fighting other humans. While this is often necessary (looking at you, Hitler), it also means a lot of real people just swept up in the currents of their times are killed (looking at you, all of the Wehrmacht who weren’t dedicated Nazis). Not nearly as much fun as killing the bugs.

Survive bomb after bomb, grenade after grenade

Also, you’re not nearly as survivable in future combat as movies and video games would have you think. Bombs, artillery fire, grenades, and even bullets can kill you very easily. You’re basically a big bag of soup with a little brain pushing it around the world, and wars are filled with all sorts of flying metal that can shred your bag.

The prequel reveal in ‘Mandalorian’ Season 2 Episode 4 will trigger you
When the enemy shows up with massive walker tanks, they probably have a dozen weaknesses. Aim for those before you count on the common cold taking them out. (Alvim Correa, from 1906 War of the Worlds)

 

Defeat the enemy thanks to their one critical weakness

Luckily, your enemies will usually have the same weakness. Unfortunately, they won’t also have one big weakness that can be exploited by some savvy Jeff Goldblum type saying, “I gave it a cold. I gave it a virus, a computer virus.” Instead, when the British start rolling the first tanks against your lines, you just have to hit them with artillery and hope they get caught in the mud.

And you press every weapon in your arsenal against the new threat. Turns out, machine guns could break off rivets inside early tanks and injure or kill the crew. High-powered rifles would split the armor and send shards into the crew. Incendiary devices could set off gas and force the crew to evacuate. So, German soldiers used all of these things.

Retrain in four jobs before the final credits roll

Remember when Jake Sully in “Avatar” took over his brother’s job as a scientist and pseudo-alien, then became a spy for the human military, then became a pilot for the alien resistance, then a small strike team leader? Those are all still different jobs, right?

In reality, most soldiers spend weeks or months learning their first job, and they can only switch jobs with more weeks or months of training. Any movie realistically showing them moving from job to job would need to be a biopic with a story spanning years of the soldier’s life.

 

Underwater fighting

Fun fact: There’s only been one documented underwater submarine battle in history. And that was an exchange between two submarines in World War II. But that hasn’t stopped movie after movie that showed submarines hitting each other or even divers fighting to the death under the waves.

It is exciting, exciting stuff — I’m partial to the underwater spear gunfight in “Thunderball” — but actual underwater fighting is super rare since almost no military forces specialize in it or want to fight in the water. Even SEALs generally fight above the waves.

Articles

The ‘Trek and the Furious’ trailer just dropped and all anyone can talk about is ‘Sabotage’

For months leading up to this week’s Star Wars: The Force Awakens premiere, the universe created by George Lucas, purchased by Disney, and boosted by Sci-Fi mastermind JJ Abrams has been central in our cultural consciousness. But remember that other franchise Abrams revived from the mothballs film and television history, the one whose crew boldly goes where no one has gone before?


The prequel reveal in ‘Mandalorian’ Season 2 Episode 4 will trigger you
No, not that Enterprise. Unless you think it’s bold to be stuck in Mombasa for the third time.

A trailer for the third installment of the rebooted Star Trek franchise, Star Trek Beyond, just popped up without warning, to what appears to be mixed applause from the trekkie-trekker community. Why, you might ask? The trailer clearly shows a significant reduction in lens flare over the previous two installments. No, the people either love or hate the choice of music for the trailer. Judge for yourselves.

There’s not much discussion about what’s new or even what the plot is, except that the cast of the previous two films have returned, with the notable addition of Idris Elba joining them as this guy. I think. Maybe not.

The prequel reveal in ‘Mandalorian’ Season 2 Episode 4 will trigger you
Who knows. They’ve been pretty hush-hush about this ever since production began.

This time it seems, things will be different. Where Abrams’ 2009 Star Trek immediately turned the canon of Star Trek on its head, director Justin Lin’s vision for the franchise is more to the heart of the “wild west in space” spirit of the original series (also, Lin probably watched more than just the Wrath of Khan for background research). And of course, Captain Kirk somehow gets on a motorcycle because Lin’s previous credits include three Fast Furious movies.

The prequel reveal in ‘Mandalorian’ Season 2 Episode 4 will trigger you
WHYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY

But he is responsible for the epic “Modern Warfare” episode of Community… so there’s hope.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AUTZj1eZmto

MIGHTY MOVIES

7 life lessons we learned from ‘Stripes’

We’ve all seen the classic movie trope where the slacker guy who failed at life because of missed opportunities and maybe a little laziness wants to pull out of his personal nose dive and succeed. In the early 1980s, Hollywood gave us some hilarious films like “History of the World: Part 1,” “Cannonball Run,” and one of the most authentic military comedies of all-time, “Stripes.”


Although the film does have a slapstick “don’t take me too seriously” comedic tone, we can learn a lot about life if we take a deeper look into the classic hit.

So check out these life lessons that we could all learn from our beloved “Stripes.”

1. Answering the call

Most people have thought about joining the military at one point in their life, but it takes a personal epiphany to decide you’re ready to take the first step.

The prequel reveal in ‘Mandalorian’ Season 2 Episode 4 will trigger you
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2. Only tell the government what they need to hear

And not a single word more.

The prequel reveal in ‘Mandalorian’ Season 2 Episode 4 will trigger you
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3. Always set goals for yourself

In the military, what you put into it is what you get out of it. True story.

The prequel reveal in ‘Mandalorian’ Season 2 Episode 4 will trigger you
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4. Don’t let your battle buddy quit

Military training can be difficult, but it’s up to your battle buddies to keep your motivation high and physically threaten the people that are trying to quit.

The prequel reveal in ‘Mandalorian’ Season 2 Episode 4 will trigger you
stripes lighten GIF Giphy

5. Leadership can be found in anyone

It’s amazing just what you’ll find in a person when you peel back some of their raw layers.

The prequel reveal in ‘Mandalorian’ Season 2 Episode 4 will trigger you
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6. Brain takes brawn

You can be up against a dangerous force, but some intelligence and quick thinking can get you out of nearly any jam.

The prequel reveal in ‘Mandalorian’ Season 2 Episode 4 will trigger you
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7. Never count out the lovable loser

They always seem to surprise us in those awesome 80’s comedies.

The prequel reveal in ‘Mandalorian’ Season 2 Episode 4 will trigger you
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Articles

Watch Mark Wahlberg, survivor Mike Williams, and other cast give their take on the new ‘Deepwater Horizon’ movie

Just a few years ago, Americans were stunned at the amount of oil spilled into the Gulf of Mexico by the British Petroleum-leased oil rig Deepwater Horizon. On April 20, 2010, a blowout during the drilling of an exploratory well caused an explosion visible from 40 miles away that killed 11 of its crew.


Over nearly three months, the spill from the Deepwater Horizon dumped 210 million barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico.

Now a film about the disaster, “Deepwater Horizon,” is set to hit theaters Sept. 30.

Mark Wahlberg plays Mike Williams, an electrician and Deepwater Horizon survivor, in a film that takes an in-depth look at the people who were working on the rig that night. Kurt Russell, John Malkovich, Gina Rodriguez, Dylan O’Brien, and Kate Hudson round out the ensemble cast.

We Are The Mighty met up with the cast – and the real Mike Williams – at the film’s premiere in New Orleans and talked with them about the film and the motivations behind it.

Mark Wahlberg – “Mike Williams”

Peter Berg – Director

Kurt Russell – “Jimmy Harrell”

Kate Hudson – “Felicia Williams”

Gina Rodriguez – “Andrea Fleytas”

Mike Williams – Deepwater Horizon survivor

MIGHTY MOVIES

Fans gather with wary excitement for new ‘Watchmen’ teaser trailer

If you’re a fan of Watchmen and you’re worried about the upcoming series from HBO, rest assured: it is in the hands of a true fan as well.

Set in the same alternate history as the graphic novel, Damon Lindelof’s (Lost, Star Trek) series will take place in the modern day where superheroes are mistrusted and the vigilante Rorschach appears to have made quite the impact.

The teaser runs against the ‘tick tock’ of a timeline we can’t yet understand, but it sets a gritty and intense tone:


Watchmen | Official Tease | HBO

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‘Watchmen’ | Official Teaser Trailer

In anticipation of fan’s reactions (and also to address the reactions of original creators Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons), Lindelof penned a lengthy (and amazing — seriously, read the whole thing) missive, which he shared on Instagram in 2018:

[instagram https://www.instagram.com/p/BjFsj6JHEdq/?utm_source=ig_embed expand=1]Damon on Instagram: “Day 140.”

www.instagram.com

“Day 140”

“We have no desire to ‘adapt’ the twelve issues Mr. Moore and Mr. Gibbons created thirty years ago. Those issues are sacred ground and they will not be retread nor recreated nor reproduced nor rebooted. They will, however be remixed.”

Lindelof goes on to assert that “Watchmen is canon. Just the way Mr. Moore wrote it, the way Mr. Gibbons drew it and the way the brilliant John Higgins colored it.” (By the way, the omission of an Oxford Comma here is just as Mr. Lindelof wrote in his letter, which I will discuss with him when I get the chance.)

That being said, he goes on to say that neither is this series a sequel. It will take place in the world the creators built, but it will be entirely its own — including a contemporary (albeit alternate) time period.

The prequel reveal in ‘Mandalorian’ Season 2 Episode 4 will trigger you

“Tick tock.”

Rorschach isn’t the only character hinted at in the teaser. The ticking time clock itself harkens to Dr. Manhattan (whose father was a watchmaker) and the Doomsday Clocks that appear in the original graphic novels, counting down to catastrophe.

As for the rest, well, most of them are Oklahoma cops, who also wear masks.

The cast includes Regina King, Jeremy Irons, Don Johnson, Jean Smart, Tim Blake Nelson, and Adelaide Clemens. Produced for HBO by White Rabbit in association with Warner Bros. Television, based on characters from DC. It is set to debut on HBO in the fall of 2019.

MIGHTY MOVIES

‘Top Gun 2’ will fly the F/A-18 Super Hornet, not the F-35

The actor Tom Cruise on May 31, 2018, tweeted a teaser for the long-awaited sequel to the movie “Top Gun” — and in doing so, he wandered into one of the most heated debates in modern combat aviation and delivered a savage burn to the F-35.

The original “Top Gun” film was nothing short of a revelation for the US Navy. People around the US and the world saw fighter jets in a whole new light, and naval aviation recruitment shot up by 500%.

A new “Top Gun” movie, now 32 years after the first, could again spike interest in combat aviation at a time when the US military struggles to retain and attract top talent. But for the most expensive weapons system in history, it already looks like a bust.

Here’s the poster for the new “Top Gun.”


Notice anything? The F-35C, the US Navy’s long overdue, massively expensive new carrier aircraft, is nowhere to be seen. Instead, the F-18 Super Hornet, the F-35’s main competitor, can be seen.

The F-35 community was not thrilled.

“Everybody that’s flown a fighter in the last 25 years, we all watched ‘Top Gun,'” retired US Marine Corps Lt. Col. David Berke, who flew F-35s and actually attended the US Navy’s Top Gun school, previously told Business Insider.

“Damn shame,” Berke said in response to the new movie’s choice of fighter. “I guess it will be a movie about the past!”

While experts agree that the F-35’s carrier-based variant, the F-35C, and its vertical-takeoff sister, the F-35B, represent the future of naval aviation, they’re just not ready for the big time yet.

The F-35B had its first operational deployment in 2018 in the Pacific, but the F-35C remains a ways off from adoption onto the US Navy’s fleet of aircraft supercarriers. Persistent problems with launching the sophisticated airplane off a moving ship have pushed back the schedule and resulted in huge cost overruns.

Meanwhile, the F-18 Super Hornet continues to do the lion’s share of combat-aviation work aboard aircraft carriers, and its maker, Boeing, has even offered an updated version of the plane that President Donald Trump entertained buying instead of the F-35.

In short, it’s an embarrassment to the F-35 program that mounting setbacks have pushed it out of a potentially massive public-relations boost.

“It’s a capable aircraft,” retired Lt. Gen. David Deptula, the dean of the Mitchell Institute of Aerospace Studies, told Business Insider of the Super Hornet. “It’s just last century’s design.”

He added: “It is a missed opportunity.”

Berke pointed out that the producers of the new “Top Gun” may have gone with the Super Hornet over the F-35 because the Super Hornet has two seats, which could facilitate filming and possibly on-screen dynamics.

The popular aviation blog The Aviationist also pointed out that Cruise is holding an outdated helmet and that the photo does not appear to take place at the US Navy’s Top Gun school. But Hollywood sometimes makes mistakes.

“Hollywood doesn’t build movies around what makes sense — they build movies around what makes money,” Deptula said.

But despite what might have come as a slight sting to F-35 boosters hoping a new film could help usher in what they call a revolution in combat aviation, both Berke and Deptula said they were looking forward to the film.

This article originally appeared on Business Insider. Follow @BusinessInsider on Twitter.

MIGHTY MOVIES

Rumor says Ghost Rider is on his way to the Avengers

You might have noticed that the ranks of the Avengers are a bit thinner than before. Iron Man and Black Widow died, Captain America retired, and Spider-Man fell victim to…a corporate squabble between Sony and Disney. Kevin Feige, the president of Marvel Studios, knows this.

The only question, then, isn’t if the Avengers will get some reinforcements but which characters from the Marvel canon those reinforcements will be. According to Daniel Richtman, a writer with a history of Marvel scoops, Feige wants Ghost Rider to be among those joining the MCU.


What’s less clear is which Ghost Rider we’re going to get. Will it be Johnny Blaze, who sold his soul to save his father and subsequently rode around on a flaming motorcycle? Or could it be Danny Ketch, who found a mystical motorcycle the night his sister was murdered?

As a side note, it was the Johnny Blaze version that Nicholas Cage played in 2007’s Ghost Rider and its 2011 sequel Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance. The absolute nuttiest thing Feige could do would be bringing Cage back and making those two pretty forgettable movies MCU canon. But we’re not holding our breath.

Another possibility is that Robbie Reyes, a Mexican-American from East L.A. who rides around in a black muscle car instead of a motorcycle, comes on board.

We also shouldn’t discount the fact that, in the modern MCU where there are, really, no rules (remember the snap?), that we get more than one Ghost Rider at once. There could be a movie version based on Johnny Blaze and a TV series centering on Robbie Reyes simultaneously.

The truth is we just don’t know yet, and we’ll probably have to wait a while to both confirm that Ghost Rider is joining the Avengers and learn which Ghost Rider (and on which medium) he or she will be appearing.

This article originally appeared on Fatherly. Follow @FatherlyHQ on Twitter.

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