The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week - We Are The Mighty
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The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week

We gather them; you love them — here are this week’s 13 funniest military memes:


Polish the floor until I can see my face in it.

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week
Yeah, I know the floor is made of dirt. Still better polish it.

 

It’s ok Marines. Maybe running just isn’t your thing.

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week
Word is that you’re good at swimming. Concentrate on that.

 

Best part is how bored the guy seems to be.

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week

 

 Mattis as SECDEF? Better pack your rucks.

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week
In their defense, fear of Mattis isn’t cowardice. It’s logic.

Careful about appointing him though. He may be immortal.

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week
Downside: Never get a new SECDEF. Upside: Forever have a great SECDEF.

 

Air Force is the chess club of the Department of Defense.

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week
Worst part? Those aren’t textbooks. She’s testing out of those classes because she already knows it all.

 

Army gives the Navy directions.

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week
It’s alright Navy. Land navigation can be hard.

 

 There’s very little that is worth risking the space-time continuum over.

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week
But Coast Guard? Come on. Marty has a legacy to protect.

 

When they need to send a message, some soldiers send emails.

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week
… but snipers aren’t very good with computers.

 

What could go wrong with this love connection?

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week
Check out the chaplain’s grin. He knows they’ll graduate before he has to provide marriage counseling.

 

Don’t complain.

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week
They gave you a free brush AND dustpan.

Combat clarinet, reporting for duty.

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week

 

Think long and hard about your budget priorities.

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week
They’ll be right there in the tanks, planes, and ships when you finish.

 

NOW: More military memes

And: 11 Things New Soldiers Complain About During Basic Training

MIGHTY MILSPOUSE

Military Spouse Mental Health – Who are our advocates?

In May we celebrate Military Spouse Appreciation Day, Mother’s Day, and Memorial Day. May is also Mental Health Awareness Month. The military lifestyle is one of constant change and uncertainty. This alone can be a trigger for mental illness. As a nation, we are now facing unimaginable mental illness triggers as quarantines, self-isolation, and social distancing continue. Throughout this month, let us focus our attention on this issue and ask:

Who is advocating for the mental health of our military spouses?



Mental Health Facts

According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, a mental illness is defined as a condition which affects a person’s thinking, feeling, behavior, or mood. Mental health conditions can be triggered by influences in one’s environment, lifestyle, and/or develop as a result of genetics. A USO study conducted in 2018 reported military spouses expressed a lack of identity and sense of purpose. The same study highlighted their difficulty maintaining networks and support systems. In addition, military spouses felt a lack of control over their lives and expressed an inability to plan for their futures. A 2017 DOD study found that military spouses experience higher rates of stress, anxiety, depression, and unemployment than their civilian counterparts. Think about these statistics and ask:

Who is advocating for the mental health of our military spouses?

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week

Barriers to Seeking Treatment

What barriers exist that prevent military spouses from seeking mental health treatment? There is a stigma associated with mental health disorders and a lack of knowledge regarding available treatments and resources. Some people may not even recognize they have an issue. Military spouses may have an additional fear of their condition negatively affecting the active duty member’s career. Could it affect opportunities for promotion, potential for future assignments and/or duty locations? There is a fear of family, friends, and colleagues being judgmental. In order to remove the barriers to seeking treatment, we need to remove the barriers to discussing mental health within the military spouse community and ask:

Who is advocating for the mental health of our military spouses?

Changing the Mental Health Landscape

How do we change the landscape surrounding the mental health of military spouses? We can begin by supporting each other and fostering a culture of inclusiveness. Be an active part of the solution amongst our own by lending an ear, asking questions, and encouraging others to ask for and accept help. We need to increase our knowledge of available resources and share them with others. A list of free, confidential mental health resources is included at the end of this article. We have the ability to change the stigma. Let’s be the voice for those who aren’t able to speak by asking:

Who is advocating for the mental health of our military spouses?

No matter how resilient we are, there will always be aspects of our lives that are beyond our control. However, we need to recognize that we do have the ability to control our own identity, purpose, wellbeing, and mental health. It takes courage to ask for help and there is no shame in needing it. Military spouses have a duty to advocate for their active duty members and their families. In order to be able to help others, we must first take care of ourselves. Therefore, we must advocate for fellow spouses, ourselves, and our own mental health.

Mental Health Resources

If you or someone you know is having thoughts of hurting themselves or others, dial 911 or go to the nearest emergency room to get help immediately. Please don’t let a cry for help go unheard. Included below are several mental health resources.

  1. Tricare Mental Health Information: Phone numbers for a crisis hotline and nurse advice line, as well as information on coverage, available programs and resources.
  2. Military One Source: Comprehensive list of available military and nationwide resources for a wide range of mental health conditions.
  3. National Institute of Mental Health: Information on how to find help for yourself, a friend or family member, struggling with mental health issues.

This article originally appeared on Military Spouse. Follow @MilSpouseMag on Twitter.

Articles

7 things people use every day that originated in the military

The military is responsible for a huge amount of consumer goods and technology that people are using everyday. Here are seven examples:


1. Duct tape

The grey tape that can “fix” just about any problem was originally designed for the U.S. military during World War II. While also manufacturing camouflage material, gas masks, and other products for the military, Johnson Johnson was asked to make a waterproof tape for ammunition cases, according to Kilmer House.

Originally called “duck tape,” it “saved valuable time in manufacturing and packaging war materials. A wide variety of tapes to serve a multitude of particular purposes were made for the aviation industry alone,” read the company’s 1945 annual report.

Soldiers quickly figured out duct tape could be used for more than sealing ammo boxes, and they used it to make temporary repairs to jeeps, planes, tents, boots, their uniforms, and everything in between. Troops still use the tape today, as do the rest of us.

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week
Not the intended use (Photo: Youtube)

2. Microwave ovens

You can thank the defense contractor Raytheon for giving you the ability to heat up that leftover pizza in under a minute. While working at the company on radar technology in 1945, Percy Spencer accidentally discovered an active radar set had melted the candy bar in his pocket. He and his colleagues were intrigued, and decided to conduct some more tests.

From Today I Found Out:

The first one they heated intentionally was popcorn kernels, which became the world’s first microwaved popcorn.  Spencer then decided to try to heat an egg.  He got a kettle and cut a hole in the side, then put the whole egg in the kettle and positioned the magnetron to direct the microwaves into the hole.  The result was that the egg exploding in the face of one of his co-workers, who was looking in the kettle as the egg exploded.

Raytheon still holds the patent, with Percy credited as the inventor. The first commercially-produced microwave was a 6-foot-tall, 7000lb monstrosity that cost $5000. But around 1967, a smaller unit at a more affordable $495 finally hit the market, according to Today I Found Out.

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week

3. Global positioning systems (GPS)

Google Maps may be one the best ways to navigate anywhere, but it owes the Pentagon credit for doing much of the legwork. Amid Cold War tensions with the Soviet Union after it launched Sputnik in 1957, U.S. researchers figured out that radio signals emitted by the satellite increased as it approached and decreased when it moved away, according to TechHive.

TechHive has more:

This gave the scientists a grand idea. Satellites could be tracked from the ground by measuring the frequency of the radio signals they emitted, and conversely, the locations of receivers on the ground could be tracked by their distance from the satellites. That, in a nutshell, is the conceptual foundation of modern GPS. That GPS receiver in your phone or on the dash of your car learns its location, rate of speed, and elevation by measuring the time it takes to receive radio signals from four or more satellites floating overhead.

This discovery became the basis for the military’s system of five satellites, called Transit, launched in 1960. It stayed exclusively a defense technology until 1983, when the Reagan administration opened GPS up for civilian application, according to Mio.

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week

4. Disposable-blade safety razors

Razors for shaving have been around for centuries, but the safety razor with disposable blades still enjoys widespread popularity due to the U.S. military’s adoption during World War I.

Before the 20th century, men usually had barbers trim their beards and mustaches. If they did shave at home it was with a straight razor, which needed to be sharpened often. In 1901, King C. Gillette changed that, with the invention of the safety razor — which took a disposable version of the straight edge razor and clamped it onto a handle. The military soon took notice.

From About.com:

Production of the Gillette ® safety razor and blade began as the Gillette Safety Razor Company started operations in South Boston. Sales grew steadily. During World War I, the U.S. Government issued Gillette safety razors to the entire armed forces. By the end of the war, some 3.5 million razors and 32 million blades were put into military hands, thereby converting an entire nation to the Gillette safety razor.

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week

5. Computers

While the original computer was not even as powerful as today’s basic calculators, it was originally designed to compute artillery firing tables for the U.S. Army. Called ENIAC, or Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer, the new device replaced humans who were physically operating desk calculators, according to Army historian William Moye.

The massive machine took up an entire room at the Army’s Ballistic Research Laboratory when it was unveiled after World War II on Feb. 14, 1946. One of its first projects was to test the feasibility of the hydrogen bomb.

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week

6. The internet

The world’s largest repository of cat videos came from a military research project that used packet-switching to allow computers to talk to each other. The first version of the internet deployed in 1969, called the Advanced Research Projects Agency Network (ARPANET), was made up of just four computers, with one each located at Stanford University, University of Utah, UCLA, and UC-Santa Barbara.

From About.com:

Designed as a computer version of the nuclear bomb shelter, ARPAnet protected the flow of information between military installations by creating a network of geographically separated computers that could exchange information via a newly developed protocol (rule for how computers interact) called NCP (Network Control Protocol).

The first internet service provider emerged in 1974, but the internet would not see widespread use until the invention of hypertext-markup language (HTML) and the world wide web were unveiled in the early 1990s.

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week

7. Freeze drying

The ability to keep food preserved for years came from a military effort to keep medical supplies useful after they were transported overseas during World War II. In freeze-drying, food is quickly frozen, then dried slowly to remove the frozen moisture.

The Ready-Store has more:

The freeze-drying process really took off during WWII as a way to transport serums and other medical supplies. Doctors found that medicines that required refrigeration were spoiling by the time they were transported to other parts of the world. The freeze-dried process was invented and allowed for materials to retain their chemical properties and drastically increasing the shelf-life.

Freeze-drying has been used for food and pharmaceuticals. But perhaps most importantly, astronauts use it to have a nice snack in space.

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week

NOW: 9 Military terms that will make you sound crazy around civilians

And: Here’s the military’s incredibly painful ‘OC spray’ training

Or, watch 13 signs you’re in the infantry:

Articles

The 9 most devastating nuclear weapons in the world

Nuclear bombs are the most powerful weapons ever devised. Here are 9 of the most destructive in history.


1. Tsar Bomba (50-100 Megatons)

“Big Ivan,” or the “Tsar Bomba,” created the largest explosion ever made by man, and it was tampered to only half of its full strength. Secretary Nikita Khrushchev demanded a record-setting bomb to prove the Soviet Union’s might ahead of an important meeting of the Communist party. To fulfill his wishes, scientists designed and created the bomb in only 15 weeks. Originally designed for a 100-megaton blast, the bomb was tampered down to only 50 megatons to prevent damage to Soviet cities in the original fallout radius. Only one was ever created.

2. B-41 nuclear bomb (10-25 MT)

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week
A B-41 prototype is detonated July 12, 1958 at the Bikini Atoll range. Photo: Wikipedia

Capable of a 25-MT blast, the B41 was the most powerful nuclear bomb ever developed by the U.S. Like the Tsar Bomba, it was a three-stage device. About 500 were created. Due to their weight, they could not ride on missiles and bombers could only carry one device at a time.

3. TX-21 “Shrimp” (15 Megatons)

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week
Photo: Wikipedia

The TX-21 was an experimental weapon that was supposed to create a 5-MT blast. An experimental fusion fuel caused the blast to increase to 15 megatons. While the U.S. ended up with a much stronger weapon than it expected, the experiment resulted in multiple deaths, untold numbers of birth defects, and the accidental contamination of 7,000 square miles of Pacific islands and ocean.

4. B-17 (10-15 Megatons)

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week
Photos: Wikipedia and US Department of Energy

The B-17 was America’s first thermonuclear bomb to be deployed. In a way, it was a tuned-down version of the TX-21. The TX-17 prototype created a 11-MT blast much larger than the expected 4-MT explosion because of an unexpected reaction in the fusion fuel.

5. B-24 (10-15 Megatons)

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week
Photo: Wikipedia

The B-24 was very similar to the B-17 but it used an enriched lithium fusion fuel instead of the natural lithium of the B-17. The experimental TX-24 produced a slightly larger explosion in testing than the B-17 (13.5 MT vs 11 MT), but the estimated yields in their weaponized forms were roughly the same.

6. B-36 (10 Megatons)

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week
Photo: Wikipedia

After the TX-21 “Shrimp” test, America fielded the B-21 with a yield of 4 MT. The military decided to convert the B-21 to B-36s, making each bomb about 2.5 times as strong.

7. B53 (9 Megatons)

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week
Photo: Wikipedia/byteboy

The B-53 contained 300 pounds of high-explosive material that triggered a uranium pit. The pit would then create a nine-megaton explosion.

8. EC-16 (6-8 Megatons)

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week

The EC-16 was an “emergency capability” nuclear device and the only thermonuclear device deployed that required a cooling system. Five devices were delivered to the U.S. arsenal in Jan. 1954, but they were quickly replaced when the more stable and easier to deploy B-14s and B-17s became operational later that year.

9. EC-14 (7 Megatons)

The EC-14 was the first solid-fuel thermonuclear weapon deployed by the U.S. It was only deployed as an emergency capability in Feb. 1954. The EC-14 was retired in Oct. 1954 and many of them were converted to B-17s.

NOW: The 7 weirdest nuclear weapons ever developed

MIGHTY TRENDING

Russian combat sidearms are built for tough, bloody wars

As the successor to the Soviet Army, the Russian Ground Forces inherited vast stocks of small arms to arm and equip a much smaller ground force. Stored in arsenals across eleven time zones were large numbers of sidearms for officers, vehicle crews, and political commissars alike. These pistols, as well as new designs, arm today’s Russian army, providing both a weapon for self-defense and a badge of authority for those wielding them.


One of the earliest Soviet Army issue handguns was the Tokarev or “TT” automatic pistol. (Note that in this context the term “automatic” refers to the loading process, not the firing process. Users of so-called “automatic” pistols must still pull the trigger for every shot fired.) Outwardly the Tokarev was utilitarian and unattractive—in other words, fitting very much into the Soviet military aesthetic. Like most Soviet weapons it was dead simple to use and reliable, though its lack of a safety required vigilance against an accidental discharge.

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week

The Tokarev weighed 1.86 pounds loaded and took a magazine of eight M30 7.62mm pistol cartridges. Internally it borrowed elements from John Moses Browning’s pistol designs, including the 1911, using a swinging link to unlock the barrel from the slide on recoil. Most Tokarevs can even fire 7.63mm Mauser used by submachine guns and the famous “broomhandle” Mauser pistol—after all Soviet engineers had designed M30 based on the Mauser cartridge.

The Tokarev was produced by the Tul’skiy Oruzheynyi Zavod, Tula factory, which is where the “TT” nickname came from. Production in the Soviet Union ceased in 1952, but not before an estimated 1.7 million Tokarevs were manufactured. Variants were made, licensed or not, in Hungary, Poland, Yugoslavia, China and North Korea.

The next Soviet handgun also took inspiration from abroad. The Pistolet Makarova (PM) was a Soviet copy of the German Walther PP (Polizeipistole, or Police Pistol), one of many handguns issued by the German army in World War II. The Makarov, as it was informally known, was a copy of the PP/K series using fewer parts to simplify the manufacturing process. The result is a pistol that resembles a less attractive version of James Bond’s famous Walther PPK. The Makarov was adopted in December 1951, just as Tokarev was winding down.

Also Read: Whether it’s used in space or in Afghanistan, the Makarov pistol is out of this world

The Makarov was both more compact and lighter than the Tokarev, with a shorter barrel. The pistol was chambered for the Soviet 9mm pistol round, a local design whose chief advantage seemed to be to prevent the Makarov from using foreign ammunition. The Soviet round is believed to have been developed from a German round, the 9mm Ultra, and is power-wise is fairly anemic by service pistol standards, somewhere between the 9mm Parabellum and the .380 ACP. Like its predecessor the Makarov carried eight rounds in the magazine.

Like all Soviet small arms, the Makarov was distributed far and wide beyond the Soviet Union, to client states and revolutionaries worldwide. Armies from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe used and still use the Makarov, and American troops have encountered the pistol in Afghanistan, Grenada, Laos, Iraq, North Vietnam and Syria. The Makarov also armed Soviet vehicle crews stationed in Eastern Europe during the Cold War, and would have rolled west with the Soviet Army and the Warsaw Pact if the war had ever turned “hot.” In 1990 the PMM, a newer version that featured a 33 percent larger magazine was introduced.

In the 1990s, Russian weapons designer Vladimir Yarygin introduced his Pistolet Yarygina or “PYa” pistol. Known as the MP-443 Grach, or “Rook” in Russian army service, PYa is a mixture of old and new designs. Like the TT, the new handgun is all steel and uses an internal mechanism reliant derived from John Browning’s Browning Hi-Power pistol. The pistol uses a modern “double action” design, which means that a single, long trigger pull will both cock the hammer and fire a round. It can also function as a single action pistol, with both hammer cocking and trigger pulling separate actions. Unlike the TT, the pistol accepts 9mm Parabellum cartridges, the standard 9mm cartridge in use worldwide.

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week

Unlike the safety-less TT, the PYa both an external safety that locks the slide—another John Browning innovation—and a second, internal safety that prevents the firing pin from falling forward without the trigger being pulled. Like most modern “double stack” pistols, the PYa’s magazine holds eighteen rounds, more than twice as many rounds as its predecessors.

Although the PYa is more modern than previous Soviet/Russian designs, the current configuration lacks more recent features in Western pistols, including an under barrel rail for attaching lasers and flashlights, a loaded chamber indicator, and a decocker that uncocks the firing pin. First introduced into Russian Armed Forces use 2003, introduction of the PYa has been slow due to the large number of PM/PMM pistols already in use.

Russia’s service handguns are simple, rugged and reliable, made to be built—and used—in wartime. While they may lack the amenities found in many modern American pistols, such as the U.S. Army’s new M17 Modular Handgun System, an emphasis on functionality means they will get the job done under extreme conditions.

Articles

‘Ensign Dilbert’ taught pilots to not accidentally kill their friends

Your grandparents and great grandparents fighting in World War II were hit with just as much safety rules as troops are today, it’s just those rules rarely make it to the history books.


But they weren’t always given their safety rules in boring briefings. When the 1940s War Department and Department of the Navy really wanted to drive safety rules home, they made snazzy safety videos and posters.

The Navy used “Ensign Dilbert,” a soup-sandwich who always breaks safety rules, to highlight the grisly results of incompetency in aviation.

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week
Shocker: This guy is the idiot. (Photo: YouTube/Nuclear Vault)

And Dilbert does some truly stupid stuff. He mishandles his weapons, tows aerial targets into ground crews, and even accidentally kills a civilian his first flight of the day. And the Navy isn’t afraid to show the (PG-13) bodies of his victims.

Check out the Dilbert video on aerial gunnery, Don’t Kill Your Friends, below:

MIGHTY TRENDING

F-35Bs enter Central Command for first time with 13th MEU

In early September 2018, the Marine Corps F-35B Lightning II entered the Central Command area of operations for the first time.

The 13th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) and the Essex Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) with the attached Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 211 is the first continental U.S.-based Navy and Marine Corps force to deploy with the Lightning II. The Essex ARG/MEU team is currently conducting a regularly scheduled deployment.

While in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations, the amphibious force is trained and equipped to conduct maritime security operations, crisis response operations, theater security cooperation and forward naval presence operations to reinforce to the U.S.’s commitment to partner nations in the region.


“As a forward-deployed force we are appropriately postured to ensure freedom of navigation and commerce in the world’s most important sea lanes,” said Gerald Olin, commander, Amphibious Squadron (PHIBRON) 1. “The embarked Marines of 13th MEU allow us the flexibility to rapidly respond to crises and set conditions that promote security in the region.”

Following a six-month comprehensive, pre-deployment training period, the Essex ARG/MEU was certified for deployment. The training consisted of three integrated at-sea periods which collectively ensured the Navy/Marine Corps team is at its highest level of readiness to accomplish missions across the range of military operations. VMFA-211 was certified for deployment across all mission essential tasks to include deep air support, close air support, offensive air support, and electronic warfare.

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week

USS Essex (LHD 2) transits the Pacific Ocean.

(Photo by Communication Specialist 3rd Class Huey D. Younger Jr.)

“When combined with inherent capabilities of the 13th MEU and Essex ARG, the F-35B strengthens the amphibious force through new and increased multi-mission capabilities, making our team a more lethal and survivable crisis response force,” said Col. Chandler Nelms, commanding officer, 13th MEU.

The Essex ARG is comprised of amphibious assault ship USS Essex (LHD 2), amphibious transport dock USS Anchorage (LPD 23) and amphibious dock landing ship USS Rushmore (LSD 47). During deployment they will operate with embarked forces of the 13th MEU, PHIBRON 1, the “Blackjacks” of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 21, and detachments from Assault Craft Unit 5, Naval Beach Group 1, Beachmaster Unit 1, Fleet Surgical Team 3 and Tactical Air Control Squadron 11.

The 13th MEU consists of the command element; the aviation combat element comprised of Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 166 Reinforced and VMFA 211; the ground combat element comprised of Battalion Landing Team 3/1; and the Logistics Combat Element comprised of Combat Logistics Battalion 13.

This article originally appeared on the United States Navy. Follow @USNavy on Twitter.

MIGHTY CULTURE

3 life-saving skills still worth practicing as a civilian

All troops, regardless of branch or service length, will one day receive a DD-214 restoring the privileges of being a civilian. This newfound freedom will allow one the opportunity to succeed or fail based on individual effort. While troops train themselves in defense of the principles that keep our country free, naturally, some training fades away.

Life-saving skills are some of the most important skills we have developed, and they continue to pay dividends years after our service has ended. Muscle memory can only go so far when the practical application is no longer scheduled. Thankfully, it doesn’t take much to remove the rust and be confidently prepared to act when our family or community needs us most.


Stop the Bleed

www.youtube.com

Use of tourniquets

Tourniquets are one of the few pieces of gear not required to turn into supply upon discharge and are worth keeping at home or in your glovebox when you enter the 1st Civilian Division. The importance of these devices cannot be understated and can be used in the event of a catastrophic car accident.

Personally, I have taught every member of my household to use a tourniquet. The youngest knows to use the sealed ones for real life and the opened ones for practice. Tourniquets lose their elasticity and may fail when you need them most if you don’t keep them fresh.

A belt or t-shirt can also be used a substitute if a proper tourniquet is not within a reasonable distance and the situation is dire. The video below comes straight from The National Center for Disaster Medicine and Public Health to raise awareness among the U.S. population.

You’re considered paranoid if nothing happens, but if something does and you’re prepared: you’re not paranoid, you’re smart.

Marines Run From Barracks To Carry Elderly From Burning Building, Then Featured on Fox and Friends

www.youtube.com

Fireman’s carry

The fireman’s carry is one of the best exercises to maintain for civilian life. It’s simple and can be integrated into a workout every once in a while to refresh muscle memory. It will keep you toned and fit, but its true purpose is to remove someone from a dangerous area when they are unable to do so on their own. These emergencies can range from a friend who has had too many drinks to full-on evacuation scenarios.

How to do the Heimlich maneuver

www.youtube.com

Heimlich maneuver

The Heimlich maneuver was developed by Dr. Henry J. Heimlich in 1974 and has saved countless lives since its inception. It is defined, by Merriam-Webster, as:

The manual application of sudden upward pressure on the upper abdomen of a choking victim to force a foreign object from the trachea.

Active duty personnel have been taught the Heimlich maneuver in numerous first aid classes, and have practiced on colleagues or state-of-the-art dummies. The procedure is simple to teach yet you do not want to leave this period of instruction for the moment when every second counts. A few moments of practice with family members can keep everyone sharp for when the unexpected happens at home or to a stranger out in town.

MIGHTY TRENDING

The Army’s cyber force is now fully operational

All 133 of U.S. Cyber Command’s cyber mission force teams achieved full operational capability, Cybercom officials announced on May 17, 2018.

Having Cybercom achieve full operational capability early is a testament to the commitment of the military services toward ensuring the nation’s cyber force is fully trained and equipped to defend the nation in cyberspace.


To reach full operational capability, teams met a rigorous set of criteria, including an approved concept of operation and a high percentage of trained, qualified, and certified personnel. As part of the certification process, teams had to show they could perform their mission under stress in simulated, real-world conditions as part of specialized training events.

“I’m proud of these service men and women for their commitment to developing the skills and capabilities necessary to defend our networks and deliver cyberspace operational capabilities to the nation,” said Army Gen. Paul M. Nakasone, Cybercom’s commander.

Cybercom leaders emphasize that while this is an important milestone, more work remains. Now, the focus will shift toward readiness to perform the mission and deliver optimized mission outcomes, continuously.

“As the build of the cyber mission force wraps up, we’re quickly shifting gears from force generation to sustainable readiness,” Nakasone said. “We must ensure we have the platforms, capabilities and authorities ready and available to generate cyberspace outcomes when needed.”

The cyber mission force has been building capability and capacity since 2013, when the force structure was developed and the services began to field and train the force of over 6,200 Soldiers, sailors, airmen, Marines and civilians.

The mission did not wait while teams were building. While they were in development, or “build status,” teams in the cyber mission force were conducting operations to safeguard the nation.

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week
(Georgia Army National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Tracy J. Smith)

“It’s one thing to build an organization from the ground up, but these teams were being tasked operationally while they were growing capability,” Nakasone said. “I am certain that these teams will continue to meet the challenges of this rapidly evolving and dynamic domain.”

The cyber mission force is Cybercom’s action arm, and its teams execute the command’s mission to direct, synchronize and coordinate cyberspace operations in defense of the nation’s interests.

Cyber mission force teams support this mission through their specific respective assignments:

— Cyber national mission teams defend the nation by identifying adversary activity, blocking attacked and maneuvering to defeat them.

— Cyber combat mission teams conduct military cyberspace operations in support of combatant commander priorities and missions.

— Cyber protection teams defend DoD’s information network, protect priority missions and prepare cyber forces for combat.

— Cyber support teams provide analytic and planning support to national mission and combat mission teams.

Some teams are aligned to combatant commands to support combatant commander priorities and synchronize cyberspace operations with operations in the other four domains — land, sea, air and space — and some are aligned to the individual services for defensive missions. The balance report directly to subordinate command sections of Cybercom, the cyber national mission force, and Joint Force Headquarters-DoD Information Network.

The cyber national mission force plans, directs and synchronizes full-spectrum cyberspace operations to deter, disrupt and if necessary, defeat adversary cyber actors to defend the nation. National mission force teams are aligned to support the cyber national mission force.

Joint Force Headquarters-DoD Information Network, which also achieved full operational capability in 2018, provides command and control of DoD information network operations, defensive cyber operations and internal defensive measures globally to enable power projection and freedom of action across all warfighting domains.

This article originally appeared on the United States Army. Follow @usarmy on Twitter.

Articles

This daring ruse turned the tide of the American Revolution

The success of the American Revolution was far from certain in the early months of 1781. The patriots managed to gain French support and survived five years of fighting yet had still not been able to win a decisive victory.


But after a fake retreat baited a ruthless British commander into a bloody ambush, the tide slowly began to turn in the Americans’ favor and eventually led to the Crown’s defeat later that year.

In March 1780, the British invaded South Carolina and captured Charleston. When the crown won a lopsided victory at the Battle of Camden, it strengthened their hold on the southern colonies and routed the Continental Army in the south.

General George Washington sent Gen. Nathaniel Greene to take command the Patriots in the south. Greene immediately dispatched Gen. Daniel Morgan into the Carolina backcountry to harass Lord Cornwallis and interdict his supply lines. In response, Cornwallis sent Lt. Col. Banastre Tarleton, a brutal young commander, to stop Morgan.

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week

The next January, Tarleton learned of Morgan’s presence and began a pursuit. Morgan began retreating north to avoid being caught between Tarleton’s and Cornwallis’ forces. Flooded rivers slowed his progress. Morgan decided to stand and fight Tarleton rather than get caught attempting to cross a river.

Although Morgan had a formidable force of over 1,000 men, Tarleton did as well. Unfortunately for Morgan, the majority of his force consisted of colonial militiamen, untested in battle. Morgan’s “green” militia had a tendency to break and run at the first hint of a real fight. Morgan knew it. Tarleton knew it. But Gen. Morgan was a clever chap.

He decided to use the untested militia as bait to draw Tarleton into a trap. Morgan devised an ingenious, if unorthodox, tactical plan. The Cowpens, a flat grazing area in backcountry South Carolina would be the place to make his stand. He used three lines of men to oppose Tarleton’s advance.

The first consisted of sharpshooters to harass the British and pick off officers. The sharpshooters would then fall back to the second line, made up of militiamen. The militia would fire off two volleys before feigning a rout and retreating to the third line. Morgan wanted the British to assume they defeated an untrained militia force and charge forward. Instead of finding a fleeing militia they would meet Lt. Col. John Howard’s colonial regulars holding the third line. In reserve, Morgan had a small force of Continental cavalry.

At dawn on January 17, Tarleton arrived at Cowpens and advanced on Morgan. Tarleton’s arrogance played right into Morgan’s trap. Although slightly outnumbered, the British had more cavalry, regular infantry, and artillery – which the colonials lacked.

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week
This painting depicts the British regulars engaging the Continentals at close range.

The British launched a frontal assault with infantry in the center and dragoons on the flanks. As they advanced, patriot sharpshooters hit the dragoons hard, taking out numerous officers and disorganizing their advance. They fell back to the second line to join the militia, as planned. When the Redcoats pressed the attack, militia fired off two volleys then began their false retreat. That’s when the British cavalry unexpectedly charged, sending the militia into a real retreat. They flew past the third line where they were supposed to reform.

The Continental cavalry, led by  Lt. Col. William Washington (cousin of  George Washington) came out of nowhere on the British right flank and dispersed their cavalry. The remaining British were still lured into the trap by the retreating militia and engaged the Colonial regulars.

Sensing victory, Tarleton committed his reserve infantry. When Lt. Col. Howard gave ordered his men to face the British reserve, a miscommunication sent them into retreat. Morgan, seeing this, quickly rode and turned the men around. They turned and fired a near point-blank volley into the advancing British infantry. It was the same trick the Americans were using in the center and it worked like a charm.

The rebels then surged into the demoralized British from all directions. As Morgan’s third line rushed forward with bayonets, the cavalry attacked from the right flank while the once-retreating militia reformed and hit the left. Many British soldiers surrendered on the spot. The rest fled.

Tarleton attempted to rally his men. He was met by Lt. Col. Washington who engaged him in hand-to-hand combat. Washington narrowly avoided being killed when his trumpeter appeared in time to dispatch a charging Redcoat. Tarleton escaped with what remained of his force.

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week
The Battle of Cowpens, painted by William Ranney in 1845. The scene depicts an unnamed black soldier (left) firing his pistol and saving the life of Colonel William Washington (on white horse at center).

The battle lasted one hour but was a decisive victory for the Americans. The British lost over 100 killed, over 200 wounded, and over 500 captured along with two cannons. The Americans lost 12 killed and 60 wounded.

Cornwallis, fed up with the Americans, marched to meet them himself. He won a pyrrhic victory at Guilford Courthouse before seeking refuge at Yorktown. Gen. Washington laid siege to Yorktown and received the British surrender there on October 18, 1781.

Articles

The Army wants to make drones using a 3-D printer

Soldiers witnessed the innovation of Army researchers recently during flight testing of 3-D printed unmanned aircraft systems that were created on-demand for specific missions.


The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week
John Gerdes, an engineer with the U.S. Army Research Laboratory, explains the capabilities of the On-Demand Small Unmanned Aircraft System, or ODSUAS, to Soldiers at the Army Expeditionary Warrior Experiments, or AEWE, at Fort Benning, Georgia, Dec. 1, 2016. (U.S. Army photo by Angie DePuydt)

The U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command invited engineers from the Army Research Laboratory to Fort Benning, Georgia Dec. 1-3, to showcase new technology at the Army Expeditionary Warrior Experiments, or AEWE.

“We’ve created a process for converting Soldier mission needs into a 3-D printed On-Demand Small Unmanned Aircraft System, or ODSUAS, as we’ve been calling it,” said Eric Spero, team leader and project manager.

With this concept, once a patrol requires UAV support, Soldiers input all their requirements into mission planning software. The system then knows the optimal configuration for the aerial vehicle and it’s printed and delivered within 24-hours.

“We thought they’re not going to think that’s fast enough, but, actually it was the opposite,” Spero said. “The timeline of 24 hours to receive a mission-custom UAS fits right in line with the way they plan and execute their missions.”

Researchers said they felt the combination of 3-D printing and UAVs was a natural technology solution.

“Drones or quadcopters are really getting big right now, I mean in particular just the commercial and hobby markets have shown what can be done with a small amount of money,” said John Gerdes, an engineer on the project.

“Additive manufacturing or 3-D printing has become huge and everybody knows all the great things that can be done with 3-D printers,” he said. “So we figured let’s assemble these two new technologies and provide a solution to Soldiers that need something right now and don’t want to wait for it.”

The team spent many hours flight testing and verifying the designs and to make sure everything was going to work the way they expected.

“It was good that we didn’t have any mistakes on game day,” said fellow engineer Nathan Beals. “The day before we did some test flights and worked out some kinks. I think we had the quad up to 55 miles per hour.”

Spero said based on feedback from Army leaders, his team hopes to work on low noise, long standoff distance, heavier payload capacity and better agility.

“I’m very optimistic that most of those are achievable,” he said. “I think the hardest one that’s going to be achievable is the heavy payload.”

Soldiers at AEWE also became fascinated with 3-D printing technologies, Spero said.

“Before we even started the briefing, we set up the 3-D printer in the conference room and started a print job,” Spero said.

The researchers printed a Picatinny Rail, which is a bracket used to mount accessories on a small arms weapon, such as an M4 carbine. In about two and a half hours, they had a rail that fit the Soldiers’ weapons perfectly.

They asked the group what other kinds of 3-D printed items they could use. In a matter of hours, the team presented a variety of functional printed parts that impressed the Soldiers.

This isn’t just about UASs,” Spero said. “It’s about forward-deployed, 3-D printing to help the Soldier.

The Army engineers continue to collaborate with partners at the Georgia Tech’s Aerospace Systems Design Lab as they continue to refine technologies for future Soldiers.

MIGHTY TRENDING

GNC is closing 248 stores after filing for bankruptcy. Here’s the full list.

GNC filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection on Tuesday night, announcing that it expects to close between 800 and 1,200 stores while on the hunt for a buyer for its business. The vitamins and supplements retailer had about 7,300 stores as of the end of March.

In a letter to shoppers, GNC said the COVID-19 pandemic “created a situation where we were unable to accomplish our refinancing and the abrupt change in the operating environment had a dramatic negative impact on our business.”


GNC identified 248 stores that would close imminently as part of the restructuring process. Stores are closing in 42 states, as well as in Puerto Rico and Canada.

Here are the first of the locations GNC plans to close, arranged alphabetically by state: 

Alabama:

Quintard Mall, 700 Quintard Drive, Oxford, AL

Arizona:

Flagstaff Mall, 4650 E 2 N Hwy 89, Flagstaff, AZ

Arrowhead Town Center, 7700 West Arrowhead Towne, Glendale, AZ

Madera Village, 9121 E. Tanque Verde Rd, Suite 115, Tucson, AZ

Arkansas:

Benton Commons, 1402 Military Road, Benton, AR

Northwest Arkansas Plaza, 4201 North Shiloh Dr, Fayetteville, AR

The Mall at Turtle Creek, 3000 East Highland Ave, Space # 309, Jonesboro, AR

Park Plaza, 6000 W. Markham, Little Rock, AR

North Park Village Shopping Center, 103 North Park Dr, Monticello, AR

McCain Mall Shopping Center, 3929 McCain Blvd, North Little Rock, AR

California:

Brawley Gateway, Brawley, CA

Rancho Marketplace Shopping Center, Burbank, CA

La Costa Town Square, 7615 Via Campanile Suite, Carlsbad, CA

Centrepointe Plaza, 1100 Mount Vernon Ave, Suite B, Colton, CA

Mountain Gate Plaza, 160 W. Foothill Parkway, #106, Corona, CA

Town Place, 787 1st Street, Gilroy, CA

Victoria Gardens, 12379 S Main St., Rancho Cucamonga, CA

Monterey Marketplace, Rancho Mirage, CA

Red Bluff Shopping Center, 925 South Main Street, Red Bluff, CA

Tierrasanta Town Center, San Diego, CA

Grayhawk Plaza, 20701 N. Scotsdale Rd, Suite 105, Scottsdale, AZ

Buena Park Mall, 8312 On The Mall, Buena Park, CA

East Bay Bridge Center, 3839 East Emery Street, Emeryville, CA

Vintage Faire Mall, 3401 Dale Road, Modesto, CA

Huntington Oaks Shopping Center, 514 W. Huntington Drive, Box 1106, Monrovia, CA

Del Monte Shopping Center, 350 Del Monte S.C., Monterey, CA

Antelope Valley Mall, 1233 Rancho Vista Blvd, Palmdale, CA

Town Country Village, 855 El Camino Real, Palo Alto, CA

Rancho Bernardo Town Center, Rancho Bernardo, CA

Rocklin Commons, 5194 Commons Drive 107, Rocklin, CA

Westfield Shoppingtown Mainplace, 2800 North Main Street, Suite 302, Santa Ana, CA

Gateway Plaza Shopping Center, 580b River St, Suite B, Santa Cruz, CA

Santa Rosa Plaza, 600 Santa Rosa Plaza, Suite 2032, Santa Rosa, CA

The Promenade Mall, 40820 Winchester Road, Temecula, CA

West Valley Mall, 3200 N. Naglee Rd., Suite 240, Tracy, CA

Union Square Marketplace, Union City, CA

Riverpoint Marketplace, West Sacramento, CA

Yucaipa Valley Center, 33676 Yucaipa Blvd, Yucaipa, CA

Colorado:

Chapel Hills Mall, 1710 Briargate Blvd at Jamboree Drive, Colorado Springs, CO

The Citadel, 750 Citadel Drive East, Space 1036, Colorado Springs, CO

River Landing, 3480 Wolverine Dr, Montrose, CO

Monument Marketplace, 15954 Jackson Creek Pkwy, Monument, CO

Central Park Plaza, 1809 Central Park Dr., Steamboat Springs, CO

Larkridge Shopping Center, 16560 N. Washington St, Thornton, CO

Woodland Park Plaza, 1115 E US Hwy 24, Woodland Park, CO

Connecticut:

The Plaza At Burr Corners, 1131 Tolland Pike, Manchester, CT

Delaware:

Dover Mall, 1365 N. Dupont Highway, Dover, DE

Gateway West Shopping Center, 1030 Forest Ave, Dover, DE

Rockford Shops, 1404 North Dupont St, Wilmington, DE

Florida:

Boynton Beach Mall, 801 N Congress St, Suite 763, Boynton Beach, FL

Clearwater Plaza, 1283 S. Missouri Ave, Clearwater, FL

Coral Square, 9295 West Atlantic Blvd, Coral Springs, FL

Dupont Lakes Shopping Center, 2783 Elkcam Blvd, Deltona, FL

The Shops @ Mission Lakes, 5516 South State Rd 7, Space # 128, Lake Worth, FL

Wickham Corners Shopping, 1070 North Wickham Road, Unit 106, Melbourne, FL

Shoppes Of River Landing, Miami, FL

Coastland Mall, 2034 Tamiam Trail North, Naples, FL

Orlando Fashion Square, 3451 E Colonial Drive, Orlando, FL

Oviedo Marketplace, 1385 Oviedo Marketplace B, Oviedo, FL

Gulf View Square Mall, 9409 Us 19 North, Port Richey, FL

University Mall, 12232 University Square C, Tampa, FL

Georgia:

The Mall @ Stonecrest, 8000 Mall Parkway, Lithonia, GA

Walnut Creek Plaza, 1475 Gray Highway, Macon, GA

Horizon Village, 2855 Lawrenceville Suwanee, Suite 740, Suwanee, GA

Merchant’s Square, 414 South Main Street, Swainsboro, GA

Idaho:

Karcher Mall, 1509 Caldwell Blvd. Suite 1206, Nampa, ID

Illinois:

Bannockburn Green, 2569 Waukegan Rd, Bannockburn, IL

University Mall, 1225 University Mall, Carbondale, IL

244 State Street, Chicago, IL

Stony Island Plaza, 1623 E 95th St, Chicago, IL

Country Club Plaza, 4285 W 167th St, Country Club, IL

South Shoppes, 2725 IL Route 26 S, Freeport, IL

Lincolnwood Town Ctr, 3333 West Touhy Av, Lincolnwood, IL

Cross County Mall, 700 Broadway East, Mattoon, IL

McHenry Plaza, 1774 N. Richmond Road, McHenry, IL

Orland Square Mall, 852 Orland Square, Orland Park, IL

Peru Mall, 3940 Rt 251, Space #E-9, Peru, IL

Northland Mall, 2900 E Lincolnway, Sterling, IL

Eden’s Plaza, 3232 Lake Avenue, Wilmette, IL

Indiana:

Putnam Plaza, 35 Putnam Place, Greencastle, IN

Nora Plaza, 1300 East 86th Street, Indianapolis, IN

Fairview Center, 556 Fairview Center, Kendallville, IN

South Point Plaza, 3189 State Rd 3 S, New Castle, IN

Iowa:

Asbury Plaza, 2565 Northwest Arterial, Dubuque, IA

Old Capitol Center, 201 Clinton Street, Iowa City, IA

Crossroads Center, 2060 Crossroads Blvd, Waterloo, IA

Kansas:

Walmart Center, 2504 South Santa Fe Dr, Chanute, KS

E 17th Ave Retail, Hutchinson, KS

Hy Vee Shops, 4000 W 6th Street, Lawrence, KS

Town Center Plaza, 4837 West 117th Street, Leawood, KS

West Ridge Mall, 1801 Wanamaker Rd., Topeka, KS

Kentucky:

Florence Mall, 2122 Florence Mall Space #2124, Florence, KY

Louisiana:

Piere Bossier Mall #520, 2950 East Texas Ave., Bossier City, LA

Broussard Village Shopping Center, 1212 D Albertson Pkwy, Broussard, LA

Prien Lake Mall, 484 West Prien Road, Space G-17b, Lake Charles, LA

Maine:

Bangor Mall, 663 Stillwater Avenue, Bangor, ME

Maryland:

Brandywine Crossing, 15902 E Crain Hwy, Brandywine, MD

Washington Center, 20 Grand Corner Avenue, Suite D, Gaithersburg, MD

St. Charles Towne Ctr, 1110 Mall Circle, Suite 6194, Waldorf, MD

Massachusetts:

Auburn Mall, 385 Southbridge St, Auburn, MA

Liberty Tree Mall, 100 Independence Way, Danvers, MA

Walpole Mall, 90 Providence Hwy, East Walpole, MA

Riverside Landing, New Bedford, MA

Emerald Square Mall, 999 South Washington Street, Box 111, North Attleboro, MA

Eastfield Mall, Boston Rd, Unit B11, Springfield, MA

Michigan:

Briarwood Mall, 850 Briarwood Circle, Ann Arbor, MI

Caro Shopping Center, 1530 West Caro Road, Caro, MI

The Marketplace Shoppes, Greenville, MI

Livonia Plaza, 30983 Five Mile Road, Livonia, MI

The Village Of Rochester Hills, 136 N Adams Road, Space #B136, Rochester Hills, MI

Forum @ Gateways, 44625 Mound Road, Mound M-59, Sterling Heights, MI

Minnesota:

Andover Marketplace, Andover, MN

Burnsville Center, 1030 Burnsville Center, Burnsville, MN

Southdale Center, 2525 Southdale Center, Edina, MN

Five Lakes Center, 334 South State St, Fairmont, MN

Midway Shopping Center, 1470 University Ave W, St. Paul, MN

Kandi Mall, 1605 1st St S, Willmar, MN

Mississippi:

Northpark Mall, 1200 East County Line Road, Space 159, Ridgeland, MS

Missouri:

West Park Mall, 3049 Route K, Cape Girardeau, MO

Chesterfield Commons, 204 THF Blvd, Chesterfield, MO

Battlefield Mall, Space #337, 2825 South Glenstone, Springfield, MO

Nebraska:

One Osborne Place, Hastings, NE

Nevada:

The Summit Sierra, 13987 South Virginia Street, Space 700, Reno, NV

New Hampshire:

Walmart Plaza, 1458 Lakeshore Rd, Gilford, NH

New Jersey:

Diamond Springs, 41 Diamond Spring Rd., Denville, NJ

The Shoppes At Union Hill, 3056 State Route 10, Denville, NJ

American Dream, 1 American Dream Way, East Rutherford, NJ

Menlo Park Shopping Center, 29 Menlo Park, Edison, NJ

302 Washington St, Hoboken, NJ

The Wall Towne Center, 2437 Route 34, Manasquan, NJ

Town Brooks Commons, 840 ROUTE 35 S, Middletown, NJ

Mall @ Short Hills, Rt 24 J.f. Kennedy Pkw, Short Hills, NJ

Tri-City Plaza, Toms River, NJ

Willingboro Plaza, 4364 Route 130 North, Willingboro, NJ

New Mexico:

Cottonwood Mall, 10000 Coors Bypass Nw, Space #d205, Albuquerque, NM

New York:

Deer Park Commons, 506 Commack Road, Deer Park, NY

Genesee Valley Shopping Center, 4290 Lakeville Rd, Geneseo, NY

Northgate Plaza, 3848 Dewey Ave, Greece, NY

Johnstown Mall, 236 North Comrie Ave, Johnstown, NY

Chautauqua Mall, 318 East Fairmont, Lakewood, NY

360 Eighth Ave, New York, NY

100 Elizabeth Street, New York, NY

163 E 125th St, New York, NY

Staten Island Mall, 2655 Richmond Avenue, Staten Island, NY

Green Acres Mall, 1134 Green Acres Mall, Valley Stream, NY

Eastview Mall, 7979 Victor-Pittsford Road, Victor, NY

North Carolina:

The Arboretum Shopping Center, 3339 Pineville Matthews, Suite 200, Charlotte, NC

Blakeney Shop Center, Charlotte, NC

Southpark Mall, 4400 Sharon Rd, Charlotte, NC

Four Seasons Town Center, 346 Four Seasons Mall, Greensboro, NC

Cross Pointe Center, 1250-l Western Blvd, Jacksonville, NC

Ohio:

Dayton Mall, 2700 Miamisburg Centerville Rd, Dayton, OH

Ohio River Plaza, 13 Ohio River Plaza, Township Road 11 Sr 7, Gallipolis, OH

Indian Mound Mall, 771 S 30th St, Heath, OH

The Shoppes Of Mason, 5220 Kings Mills Road, Mason, OH

Heritage Crossing, 3113 Heritage Green, Monroe, OH

The Town Center At Levis, 4135 Levis Commons Blvd, Perrysburg, OH

Miami Valley Centre, 987 E. Ash Street, Piqua, OH

Sandusky Mall, 4314 Milan Road, Sandusky, OH

Southpark Mall, 500 Southpark Center, Strongsville, OH

Crocker Park, 137 Market Street, West Lake, OH

Meadow Park Plaza, 1659 Rombach Ave, Wilmington, OH

Oklahoma:

Neilson Square, 3322 W Owwn K Garriott Road, Enid, OK

Oregon:

Cascade Station, 10207 NE Cascades Pkwy, Portland, OR

Seaside Factory Outlet, 1111 North Roosevelt, Seaside, OR

Pennsylvania:

South Mall, 3300 Lehigh Street, Allentown, PA

Logan Valley Mall, 300 Logan Valley Mall, Bk 4, Altoona, PA

Clearview Mall, Route 8, Butler, PA

Clearfield Mall, 1800 Daisy Street, Clearfield, PA

Neshaminy Mall, 707 Neshaminy Mall, Cornwell Heights, PA

Cranberry Mall, 20111 Route 19. Freedom, Cranberry, PA

Oxford Valley Mall, 2300 E Lincoln Highway, Langhorne, PA

Hyde Park Plaza, 451 Hyde Park Road, Leechburg, PA

Monroeville Mall, Monroeville, PA

Shoppes At Montage, 2105 Shoppes Blvd, Moosic, PA

Edgmont Square Shopping Center, Newtown Square, PA

Pine Creek Center, 195 Blazier Drive, Unit 6, Pittsburgh, PA

Springfield Mall, 1200 Baltimore Pike, Springfield, PA

Lehigh Valley Mall, 215 Lehigh Valley Mall, Whitehall, PA

3097 Willow Grove Mall, 2500 Moreland Road, Willow Grove, PA

Wynnewood Shopping Center, 50 East Wynnewood Road, Wynnewood, PA

York Galleria, 2899 Whiteford Rd, York, PA

Rhode Island:

Hunt River Commons, 72 Frenchtown Road, North Kingston, RI

Diamond Hill Plaza, 1790 Diamond Hill Road, Woonsocket, RI

South Carolina:

Anderson Mall, 3139 N Main, Anderson, SC

Haywood Mall, 700 Haywood Road, Greenville, SC

North Hills Shopping Center, 2435 E North Street, Suite 1115, Greenville, SC

Myrtle Beach Mall, Myrtle Beach, SC

Shoppes At Stonecrest, 1149 Stonecrest Blvd, Tega Cay, SC

Tennessee:

University Commons, 2459 University Commons W, B160, Knoxville, TN

Three Star Shopping Center, 1410 Sparta Road, McMinnville, TN

Southland Mall, 1215 East Shelby Drive, Memphis, TN

Wolfchase Galleria, Memphis, TN

Texas:

Alamo Corners, 1451 Durenta Avenue, Suite 3, Alamo, TX

Barton Creek Square, 2901 Capital Of Texas Hwy, Austin, TX

Sunland Park Mall, 750 Sunland Park Drive, Space J4, El Paso, TX

North East Mall, 1101 Melbourn Road, Suite #3090, Hurst, TX

Sheppard Square, 2055 Westheimer, Suite 160, Houston, TX

Ingram Park Mall, 6301 Northwest Loop 410, San Antonio, TX

Rivercenter Mall, 849 East Commerce Street, San Antonio, TX

Virginia:

Charlottesville Fashion Square, 1588 Fashion Square Mall, Charlottesville, VA

Franklin Commons, 144 Council Drive, Franklin, VA

Dulles 28, 22000 Dulles Retail Plaza, Ste 154, Sterling, VA

Maple Avenue Shopping Ctr, 335 Maple Avenue East, Vienna, VA

Washington:

Everett Mall, 1402 SE Everett Mall, Suite #225, Everett, WA

Village At Redmond Ridge, Redmond, WA

The Joule, 509 Broadway, Seattle, WA

Jefferson Square, 4722 West 42nd Ave SW, Seattle, WA

Spokane Valley Mall, 14700 E Indiana Avenue, Spokane Valley, WA

Green Firs Shopping Center, University Place, WA

Vancouver Plaza, 7809 Vancouver Plaza #160, Vancouver, WA

Wisconsin:

Bay Park Square, 311-a Bay Park Square, Green Bay, WI

East Town Mall, 2350 East Mason Street, Green Bay, WI

Janesville Mall, 2500 Milton Ave, Space 117, Janesville, WI

The Shops Of Grand Avenue, Milwaukee, WI

West Virginia:

Greenbrier Valley Mall, 75 Seneca Trail US Route 219, Fairlea, WV

Puerto Rico:

Plaza Guayama, Guayama, PR

Condominio Reina De Casti, 100 Paseo Gilberto, San Juan, PR

Centro Gran Caribe, Carretera #2 Km 29.7, Vega Alta, PR

Canada:

Marlborough Mall, Calgary, AB, Canada

Shawnessy Town Centre, Calgary, AB, Canada

Bonnie Doon Shopping Centre, Edmonton, AB, Canada

Bower Place, Red Deer, AB, Canada

Sevenoaks Shopping Centre, 32900 South Fraser Way, Abbotsford, BC, Canada

Brentwood Towne Centre, Burnaby, BC, Canada

Eagle Landing Sc, 706-8249 Eagle Landing Pk, Chilliwack, BC, Canada

Dawson Mall, 11000 8th Street, Dawson Creek, BC, Canada

Willowbrook Shopping Center, Langley, BC, Canada

Queensborough Landing, New Westminster, BC, Canada

Mayfair Shopping Centre, Victoria, BC, Canada

Brandon Shoppers, 1570-18th St Unit 87, Brandon, MB, Canada

Smartcentres Corner Brook, Corner Brook, NL, Canada

Georgian Mall, 509 Bayfield Street, Barrie, ON, Canada

Lynden Park Mall, 84 Lynden Road, Brantford, ON, Canada

Cataraqui Town Center, 945 Gardiners Rd, Kingston, ON, Canada

Williamsburg Town Centre, Kitchener, ON, Canada

Masonville Place, London, ON, Canada

Markham Town Centre, 8601 Warden Ave, Markham, ON, Canada

Creekside Crossing, 1560 Dundas St E, Mississauga, ON, Canada

Erin Mills Town Centre, Mississauga, ON, Canada

Westside Market Village, 520 Riddell Road, Orangeville, ON, Canada

Markham Steeles Shopping Centre, 5981 Steeles Avenue East, Scarborough, ON, Canada

Morningside Crossing, Scarborough, ON, Canada

New Sudbury Centre, 1349 Lasalle Blvd, Sudbury, ON, Canada

St Claire Runnymede Rd, 2555 St Clair Ave West, Toronto, ON, Canada

Colussus Centre, 31 Colussus Dr, Vaughan, ON, Canada

Laurier Quebec, 2700 Laurier Boulevard, Quebec, PQ, Canada

Galeries Rive Nord, 100 Boulevare Brien, Repentigny, PQ, Canada

This article originally appeared on Business Insider. Follow @BusinessInsider on Twitter.

Articles

This is what happens when your father was your drill instructor’s drill instructor

If Marine Corps boot camp is a bitter slice of hell, then drill instructors are the demons who dish it.


Now imagine what basic training would be like if your drill instructor was your father’s recruit and knew it. That’s exactly what happened to Reddit user hygemaii.

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week
Gunnery Sergeant Shawn D. Angell gently corrects a trainee. (Photo: U.S. Marine Corps)

You’d expect one of two things to happen: you get favorable treatment because your father treated your DI to a rose garden — highly unlikely — or you become your DI’s reprisal punching bag for everything your father put him through as a recruit — probably more realistic. Here’s how the story played out, according to hygemaii (mildly edited for grammar and curse words):

“My best military story is my own boot camp story. I decided to join the Marine Corps almost on a whim after planning to join the Air Force for most of my senior year in high school.

Related: 5 of the funniest boot camp stories we’ve ever heard

Same old story of AF recruiters seeming like they didn’t give a sh-t about their appearance or job and the Marine recruiter putting out max effort all the time and always being presentable. I was a pretty easy mark for the USMC because my dad was in the USMC; I grew up on bases all over the U.S. until we moved to the little farm town in North Florida where I went to high school.

Since I was 18, I basically did all the paperwork myself, found a job series I liked, signed, the whole nine yards, my dad didn’t know anything until I told him I was going to MEPS and joining the Marines. He was overjoyed, obviously. He loved the Corps and regretted getting out after 12 years.

Now the story gets funny. My dad was a drill instructor when he was in the Marines. I remembered living on Parris Island but didn’t think much of it. When I got my ship date for boot camp, my dad called some old friends and I ended up in a Company who’s First Sergeant was an old friend of my dad’s — they served on the drill field together all those years ago. So through some sort of crazy coincidence, I end up in a platoon with a drill instructor who was a recruit under my dad (6-7 years prior to me going to boot camp).

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week
A Drill Instructor whispers loving words of encouragement to Marines who needed some motivation. (U.S. Marine Corps)

I have a very distinct name, and on the second day after we got our real drill instructors, as he was going through roll call, the drill instructor suddenly fell quiet. After a couple of seconds, he said my name, perfectly pronounced, and I knew I was f-cked.

He said “Lastname, I bet there aren’t too many Lastnames in the world like that, are there?” Sir, no sir. “Was your daddy a Marine in the 90’s Lastname?” Sir, yes sir. “F-cking good, Lastname, good. Get on my quarterdeck now.”

I spent the rest of boot camp unable to make myself invisible. It spread from my drill instructor to drill instructors from other platoons, even other Companies. It was f-cking miserable. I felt bad for my rack mate, because at one point for about three days I had to move my entire rack to the quarterdeck and he was just along for the ride, so he caught a lot of it, too.

It made graduating really special, in retrospect, to finally get the kind words from that drill instructor, but man that sucked. I’m pretty sure this entire thing was set up by my dad and his buddy, but they both deny it, and there’s no way to prove it.

It was funny seeing my drill instructor stand a little straighter when he saw my dad at graduation.”