Widgets Magazine
MIGHTY CULTURE

There's a hidden language in how you stamp an envelope

Ever notice how some envelopes arrive to your deployed friends with the stamp upside down? Probably not, but oftentimes you'll see it. Sometimes they're also tilted at an angle. This is not an accident, it's an antiquated but still-living little language in the placement of a stamp.


There's no better way to tell someone in jail you love them.

An upside-down stamp means "I love you." The stamp posted slightly off-kilter means "I miss you." There's a lot more crammed into the placement of one little square on a slightly larger square. It's an old-timey easter egg, a way to make the letter more than a piece of paper, to personalize it and make even the envelope ones own, transmitting a little emotion along with their ancient text message.

The coded messages are more than a century old now, having their origins in the Victorian Era and have somehow survived the advent of modern texting, email, and other forms of communication that don't require stamps.

Of course, there are variations to the language.

"Another military wife told me that her grandmother used to flip her stamps when writing her husband, who was deployed overseas," Janie Bielefeldt, an ex-marine living in Jacksonville, N.C. told the New York Times. "It's just something you hear about on the base."

In those days, young lovers couldn't exactly be as open with their emotions as we have come to be. The idea of sending nudes or a dick pic might actually cause someone to get hanged or burned at the stake back then. Of course, not so these days, where an entire subculture grew up around sending racy photos. For U.S. military members and their families, however, the practice of writing letters is alive and well, and with it is the language of stamps.