MIGHTY CULTURE

6 ways to drink like a nearly-immortal American warrior

The life of Ernest Hemingway is something most men only ever get to daydream about. He was an ambulance driver, wounded in action. He was a war correspondent, covering the Spanish Civil War and World War II (the man landed at Omaha Beach on D-Day in the seventh wave), he led resistance fighters against the Nazis in Europe, and even hunted Nazi submarines in the Caribbean with his personal yacht.


The machine gun in the photo above is for Nazis AND sharks

In your entire life, you'd be lucky to do one of the things Hemingway wrote about in his books. And one of the reasons his books are so good (among many) is because he wrote many of them from first-hand experience. He actually did a lot of the John-McClane, Die Hard-level stunts you can read about right now at your local library.

Think about it this way: His life was so epic that he won a Nobel Prize in Literature just for telling us the story.

Related: 10 ways Ernest Hemingway was a next-level American warrior >

Two world wars, two plane crashes, and the KGB couldn't do him in. In a strange way, it makes sense that only he could end his own incredible life. This summer (or winter. Or whatever), celebrate your own inner Hemingway by having a few of his favorite beverages while standing at a bar somewhere.

He definitely invented some of these drinks. And might have invented others. But we only know for sure that he enjoyed them all.

Remember, according to the bartender on Hemingway's boat, Pilar, no drink should be in your hand longer than 30 minutes.

1. The Daiquiri

It is necessary to start with the classic, because everyone knows the writer's love for a daiquiri – it was as legendary then as it is today. His favorite bar in Havana even named a take on the classic cocktail after Hemingway but don't be mistaken, that's only an homage. The way the author really drank his cocktails is very different from what you might expect.

Nearly ever enduring cocktail recipe has its own epic origin story. The daiquiri is no different. Military and veteran readers might be interested to know the most prevalent is one of an Army officer putting the ingredients over ice in the Spanish-American War. But in truth, the original daiquiri cocktail is probably hundreds of years old. British sailors had been putting lime juice in rum for hundreds of years (hence the nickname, "limeys").

A daiquiri is just rum, sugar, and lime juice, shaken in ice and served in a chilled glass.

  • 2 oz light rum
  • 3/4 oz lime juice
  • 3⁄4 oz simple syrup

Preferably served by the Florida Bar in Havana.

(Photo by Blake Stilwell)

2. "Henmiway" Daiquiri

That's not a typo, according to Philip Green's "To Have and Have Another," a masterfully-researched book about Hemingway and his favorite cocktails and the author's drinking habits, that's how this take on the classic daiquiri was written down by bartender and owner of Hemingway's Floridita bar, Constantino Ribalaigua. Hemingway was such a regular at the bar by 1937 that Ribalaigua wanted to name a drink after him.

  • 2 oz white rum
  • Tsp grapefruit juice
  • Tsp maraschino liqueur
  • Juice of 1/2 lime
The version above is served up, while a tourist version, the Papa Doble, is served blended.
  • 2 1/2 oz white rum
  • Juice 1/2 grapefruit
  • 6 Tsp maraschino liqueur
  • Juice of 2 limes

But Papa Hemingway (as he was called) didn't like sweet drinks. When he had a daiquiri at Floridita, he preferred them blended but with "double the rum and none of the sugar." Essentially, Hemingway enjoyed four shots of rum with a splash of lime juice.

Drink one with a friend, repeat 16 times to be more like Ernest Hemingway.

3. Dripped Absinthe

Absinthe is a liquor distilled with the legendary wormwood, once thought to give absinthe its purported hallucinogenic effects. Who knows, it might have really had those properties, but today's absinthe isn't the same kind taken by writers and artists of the 19th century; the level of wormwood they could cram into a bottle was much, much higher then. What you buy today would not be the same liquor Robert Jordan claimed could "cure everything" in For Whom the Bell Tolls.

Absinthe is prepared in a way only absinthe can be — with ice water slowly dripped over a sugar cube, set above an absinthe spoon and dripped into the absinthe until it's as sweet as you like. The popularity of absinthe cocktails is still prevalent in places like New Orleans, where the bartenders keep absinthe spoons handy. No one would have the patience to wait for an Old Fashioned made this way, but for absinthe, its well worth the effort.

If you're looking for a wormwood trip, though, you may need to distill your own.

Be patient.

4. Hemingway's Bloody Mary

There are a number of origin stories for the Bloody Mary — and one of them involves Ernest Hemingway not being allowed to drink. According to one of Hemingway's favorite bartenders, the author's "bloody wife" wouldn't let him drink while he was under the care of doctors. In Colin Peter Field's "Cocktails of the Ritz Paris," Field says bartender Bernard "Bertin" Azimont, created a drink that didn't look, taste, or smell like alcohol.

How the author would feel about bacon-flavored vodka, strips of bacon served in the drink, or any modern variation on the bloody, (involving bacon or otherwise) is anyone's guess.

Hemingway's only recipe is by the pitcher, because "any other amount would be worthless."

  • 1 pint Russian vodka
  • 1 pint tomato juice
  • Tbsp Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 oz of lime juice
  • Celery salt, cayenne pepper, black pepper

Garnish it however you want.

Papa Hemingway didn't garnish.

5. Death In The Afternoon

Want to drink absinthe, but don't have the patience for the drip spoons? You aren't alone. But you still need to figure out how to make the strong alcohol more palatable (go ahead and try to drink straight absinthe. We'll wait.). Ready for a mixer?

Hemingway called on another one of his favorite beverages for this purpose: champagne. Hemingway loved champagne. You might love this cocktail, but you'll want to be ready for what comes next. Champagne catches up with you. But that's a worry for later.

After a few of these, you'll be brave enough to do some bullfighting yourself (the subject of Hemingway's book, "Death in the Afternoon." But be warned, like most champagne cocktails, they go down smooth... but you might need that pitcher of Bloody Mary the next morning.

  • 1 1/2 shots of absinthe
  • 4 oz of champagne (give or take)

In a champagne glass, add enough champagne to the absinthe until it "attains the proper opalescent milkiness," according to author Philip Greene's book. But that "proper" was for Hemingway. You may want to adjust your blend accordingly.

Hemingway recovering from his wounds in a World War I hospital with a bottle of stuff that can "cure everything." The afternoon would have to wait.

6. El Definitivo

This drink is designed to knock you on your ass. Hemingway and his pal created it in Havana in 1942 to win baseball games.

No joke. During these games, essentially little league games, the kids would run the bases while the adults took turns at bat. It turns out Hemingway had a running rivalry with a few of the other parents. But he wasn't about to get into a fistfight about it like some people might. He had a much better, more insidious plan.

In "To Have and Have Another," author Philip Greene describes how Hemingway created "El Definitivo" to just destroy other little league parents. But he liked them, too (the drink, that is) — and was often sucked in under its spell with everyone else.

  • 1 shot of vodka
  • 1 shot of gin
  • 1 shot of tequila
  • 1 shot of rum
  • 1 shot of scotch
  • 2 1/2 oz tomato juice
  • 2 oz lime juice
Serve over ice in a tall, tall glass. Get a ride home from little league.