David Burnett was a U.S. Army Special Operations Crew Chief with the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment. You might know it better as the "Night Stalkers." He even wrote a book about his time with the Night Stalkers. His latest project isn't about the Army, however. It's for the Army, for the military. It's an invention borne of necessity – as all great inventions are – and could save lives.

In short, David Burnett wants you out of his helicopter as soon as possible.


While he was in the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment, troops would board his Chinook for the ride, normally hanging their go bags and other gear inside with carabiners and bungee cord. These are the usual, practical things with which American troops deploy to combat zones. While sitting in a brightly-lit flightline with the cabin lights on, this was no big deal. But U.S. troops, especially special operators, don't fly to the enemy with the cabin lights on. They're usually flying in at night, blacked out. It was in those situations David Burnett realized he and his Chinook were spending a lot more time on the ground than they wanted.

The good guys were having trouble releasing their stowed gear. It was still connected to the aircraft. All the old methods of fixing their gear didn't offer quick-release functionality. David Burnett decided he was going to do something about that.

The Tac Clamp was born.

Burnett's creation isn't just a metal clamp. It can be hooked and fastened for quick release, or it can be placed on a tactical track for movement in a ready room, a hangar, arms room, or even the back of an aircraft. With the push of a button, the Tac Clamp will release its iron grip and let the special operator free to bring the fight to the enemy – and it works. It works really well. Burnett's clamp has been submitted to aircrews at MacDill Air Force Base for review and is currently being field-tested by Navy Search and Rescue teams.

"I deployed with the 160th five times as a crew chief, and I saw this problem constantly on the aircraft and on vehicles too," Burnett says. " The reason was because all of these outdated methods they were using don't offer quick release and is not very intuitive. This is something you clamp inside the aircraft but is not exclusive to the aircraft. If they were doing a ground assault and they can hook the Tac Clamp in their gear and just push a button to release it."

​Burnett even created a Tac Clamp for aerial photography.

Currently, Burnett is working on getting one of the military branches to accept the Tac Clamp for consideration for small-business contracting programs. He currently has two proposals submitted, one for the Air Force and two for the Army. It's been a long road for Burnett, but he hasn't given up. What he's offering is something he's seen a need for in the military, one that could potentially save American lives. He's already getting feedback on his aluminum clamp from troops in the field.

"Troops tell me they need a small version, made of hard plastic, one they can attach to their kit," says Burnett, who enjoys the innovation. "All branches of service, they're realizing they can streamline innovation process by allowing small businesses to propose their technologies and get new products and innovative technologies fielded within 18 months."