Veterans

These are Britain's most controversial World War II vets

It's been 72 years since the end of World War II, and most vets who served have passed away, with many of them honored as being part of the "Greatest Generation." However, a few of those still alive are fighting for the recognition they believe they are due, including the one of the last surviving aircrew who took part in one of the most famous attacks in World War II.


According to a report by the London Daily Mail, former RAF aircrewman Johnny Johnson, MBE, who took part in Operation Chastise – the attack on the Mohne, Elbe, and Sorpe dams in 1943, is among those campaigning for World War II veterans of the Royal Air Force's Bomber Command to receive a medal. And he has some very harsh words for some historians.

RAF Lancasters during a fire-bombing raid. (Wikimedia Commons)

"I have a pet hate of what I call 'relative' historians. I ask them two questions: 'Were you there?' and 'Were you aware of the circumstances at the time?' The answer is no, so keep your bloody mouth shut," he said.

RAF's Bomber Command, most famously lead by Sir Arthur "Bomber" Harris, carried out numerous bombing missions against Nazi-occupied Europe during World War II. According to the Royal Air Force Benevolent Fund, 55,573 men who served in that command made the ultimate sacrifice.

Air Chief Marshal Sir Arthur Harris, who lead Bomber Command from February 1942 to September 1945. His men were given a difficult and ugly job, only to have politicians give them short shrift after the war. (Wikimedia Commons)

Bomber Command notably launched missions against German cities, most notably the 1945 bombing of Dresden, often sending over a thousand planes to carry out area-bombing missions against targets at night. The Daily Mail noted that the tactic caused heavy civilian casualties, causing the same politicians who ordered the bomber crews to carry out those difficult missions to distance themselves from the bomber offensive after World War II.

A memorial to Bomber Command's fallen was not commissioned until 2012. A clasp was also awarded to veterans of Bomber Command, but Johnson is not satisfied.

Dresden after RAF Bomber Command visited it in February, 1945. (Deutsche Fotothek)

"All I'm asking for is a Bomber Command medal," he told the Daily Mail. He also is advocating that ground crews receive recognition for their efforts.