Watch these newbies try to kill themselves on the grenade range - We Are The Mighty
WATCH

Watch these newbies try to kill themselves on the grenade range

Engaging a target with a grenade couldn’t be simpler, you pull the pin and throw it. Yet for some weird reason, perhaps out of fear or fascination, it doesn’t always go so smooth.


U.S. Army weaponeers designed modern grenades like balls to capitalize on soldiers’ experience with sports. Today soldiers typically refer to the small bomb as a “baseball grenade” because of its size and overall feel. The Army even experimented with football shaped anti-tank grenades during the 1960s. Perhaps they foresaw baseball’s decline as America’s past time and the rise of football.

It’s dangerous when you don’t do it right but also entertaining. Regardless, it shouldn’t be as hard as the people in this video make it out to be.

Watch:

 

H/T: Funker 530

WATCH

Help your “friends” clean up their acts with the Blue Falcon Correctional Kit

Today’s special offer is guaranteed to help all your “friends” get their collective acts together ASAP!


Here at the Mighty Value Center, we provide only the best quality, top-of-the-line products developed from extensive research on the front lines and delivered right to your door.

After decades of brown nosing, snitching, and general a$$hole-ishness, military scientists have discovered the secret to stopping the notorious buddy-f***er in his tracks.

Veteran salesman Greg Hahn brings you the Blue Falcon Correction Kit, guaranteed to make your day better (or at least make you feel better) whenever some jerk goes out of his way to make your day worse.

Get yours today! Supplies are limited. (Marines, do not eat the soap.)

MIGHTY TRENDING

Plus-size vet comic: ‘This is what happens when you get out of the Marine Corps’

Marine veteran James P. Connolly (Sirius/XM Radio, Comics Unleashed) hosted the 6th Annual Veteran’s Day Benefit Comedy Show “Cocktails Camouflage” at Flappers Comedy Club in Burbank, California in early November.


All funds raised were donated to Veterans in Film Television (VFT), a non-profit networking organization that unites current and former members of the military working in film and television and offers the entertainment industry the opportunity to connect with and hire veterans.
In this video, USMC vet Shawn Halpin takes the stage to give us a review of his experience with the P90X workout program.
MIGHTY TRENDING

Watch these five vets remember the hardest parts of bootcamp

WATM hosted groups of veterans to answer several questions about their time in the military. The vets kept it real when responding to topics ranging from relationships to recruiters.


Editor’s note: If you have ideas for questions that you’d like to see a group of veterans answer, please leave a comment below.

 

Music courtesy of Jingle Punks:

Gotta Get To Work-JP – imilly

Anyone Else-JP – The Beards

MIGHTY TACTICAL

This amazing video shows how rifle suppressors work using a see-through silencer

It’s pretty clear that in today’s military, rifle suppressors are a thing. 


Long relegated to James Bond movies and secret squirrel types in the U.S. military, firearms mufflers now are becoming more popular in line units. Infantry leaders are beginning to recognize the benefits of silencers, with their ability to help mask a shooter’s location by suppressing both sound and flash.

Experts also preach that a suppressor makes shooting a lot easier on the trooper by reducing recoil and tamping down the “flinch” reaction that inevitably comes from firing a 165 decibel rifle shot.

Watch these newbies try to kill themselves on the grenade range
(US Marine Corps photo)

“Cans,” as they are colloquially known, reduce an M4 rifle shot’s report an average of about 20 decibels — that’s not enough to “silence” them, but it’s enough to meet hearing safety requirements for government regulators.

In fact, the Marine Corps has been experimenting with equipping entire infantry units with suppressed rifles, and sees them as enough of a game changer that they’re pushing to include cans with almost every rifle they shoot.

But how these little tubes of steel or titanium do what they do has always been a bit of a mystery to most shooters. The internal architecture of the suppressor’s baffles are part engineering mastery, part material science part alchemy and each manufacturer has its own design to get the sound down.

Now, an Alabama-based silencer maker has built his cans with a clear, hardened acrylic that shows in vivid detail exactly what’s going on inside when the smoke and flame eject from the muzzle. And YouTuber SmarterEveryDay took his high speed camera to the range and got some amazing footage of the gas and blast dissipating trough a silencer.

It’s a very cool look at a device silencer expert and current 2nd Marine Division Gunner Christian Wade says “increases the effectiveness of your weapon.”

MIGHTY TRENDING

This soldier caught her second wind as a model/actress after battling cancer

Mylee Cardenas had a plan: stay in the Army until they told her to leave. But her dreams of becoming a career soldier were derailed by cancer. Instead, she found her second wind in life as a model and actress.


Without any money in the family to afford college, Mylee had intended to use the military to become a doctor, joining at seventeen as soon as she finished high school. Once she was in, however, her plan quickly changed to be a career soldier. She deployed to Northern Afghanistan, where her unit was responsible for all nine provinces in the region. However, while she was there, things changed.

When she was diagnosed with Stage III breast cancer, she had every intention of defeating it and throwing herself straight back into the fight. The medical board reviewing her case had other ideas. After a lengthy process, she was declared unfit for duty, and retired due to both the breast cancer and severe combat-related PTSD.

She lost her uniform, which she considered her shield and strength overnight, but she gained so many new opportunities. Through motivational speaking, she was able to inspire people, especially veterans, around the country with her story. She now models, acts, and is a fitness coach on the side while she goes to school in the hopes of becoming a physical therapist.

Although she still comes home with the muscle memory of waiting for a phone call telling her she can return to duty, she now has other plans in place. While her circumstances of leaving the military were sad, she also came out with the feeling of suddenly being free.

WATCH

We asked civilians to name the highest medal awarded for bravery. Here’s what they said.

We sent our “Vet On The Street” to downtown Hollywood to find out if people could name the highest medal awarded for bravery on the battlefield. U.S. Marine Corps veteran and comic James P. Connolly got answers from locals, tourists, and even Captain America. Check it out:


NOW: We asked civilians to name the five military branches. This is the hilarious result.

OR: ‘America Ninja Warrior’ made a course inspired by Navy SEAL training

WATCH

Watch how the Air Force blasted the enemy in Vietnam

When people think of airborne operations during the Vietnam War, they think of a lot of helicopters flying around delivering troops while the Air Force and Navy flew against North Vietnam. While those were big parts of the war, the air campaign was much, much more than just that.


Air Force, Navy, and Marine Corps planes often provided close-air support for American troops on the ground in South Vietnam. Meanwhile, they also were hitting the Ho Chi Minh Trail or blasting other targets on a constant basis. Across the many pieces of this complex air campaign, two planes, in particular, did a lot of the work.

Watch these newbies try to kill themselves on the grenade range
A F-100D Super Saber with the 355th Tactical Fighter Squadron. (USAF photo)

One was the North American F-100 Super Sabre. As its name implies, this aircraft was intended to succeed the F-86 Sabre, which dominated the skies over Korea, as an air-superiority fighter. The A-model of the F-100 had its share of teething problems and, as a result, it never quite became a fighter. Where the F-100 did succeed, though, was as a fighter-bomber. The F-100C emerged as a fighter-bomber capable of carrying 5,000 pounds of bombs. The F-100D was an improved version that could also fire the AIM-9 Sidewinder heat-seeking missile. The F-100F was intended as a trainer, but it would eventually become the first Wild Weasel.

Watch these newbies try to kill themselves on the grenade range
F-105 Thunderchiefs taking off on an air raid against North Vietnam. (USAF photo)

Another plane that gets a lot of attention for successes in Vietnam is the Republic F-105 Thunderchief. This was the primary fighter-bomber used during the earlier portions of the Vietnam War. MilitaryFactory.com credits it with a top speed of 1,390 miles per hour, a maximum range of 920 miles, and the ability carry up to six tons of weapons. It also had an M61 Gatling gun with over 1,000 rounds of ammo, which blew away more than one over-confident punk in a MiG.

Take a look at the video below to get a glimpse into the aerial fighting of the Vietnam War. In the video, you’ll get a look at other planes that didn’t make big headlines, like the F-4 Phantom, the A-1 Skyraider, and the A-37 Dragonfly.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aTvndd8RflM
(Jeff Quitney | YouTube)
MIGHTY TRENDING

This home-cooked meal helped a combat engineer transition home from Afghanistan

Keeping the troops well fed is a big part of how the military works. Navy veteran and pop-up chef August Dannehl knows this better than most. In the WATM series “Thank You For Your Service” August cooks a four-course meal for his fellow vets, and each course is inspired by a veteran’s story from his or her time in uniform.


When he came home from Afghanistan, Max’s mom prepared the classic Nicaraguan Carne Asada dish with fried plantains. It was a symbol of prosperity and transition into good times from his childhood. When he was young, his mother was a new immigrant to the U.S. and as a single mother, it was sometimes hard for her to put food the table. This dish always served as an embodiment of her love and stayed with Max from his home to overseas.

Short Rib Carne Asada w/ Bacon Jam, Apricot Mojo and Platanos

Inspired by Max’s Mother’s Nicaraguan Carne Asada

Ingredients

Carne

8 beef short ribs

1/4 cup all-purpose flour

6 thin slices bacon, diced

2 tablespoons olive oil

4 garlic cloves, minced

3 carrots, diced

2 jalapeno, finely minced

1 medium onion, diced

Splash of red wine

4 cups Cola

4 cups beef broth (low sodium)

2 sprigs fresh thyme

2 sprigs fresh rosemary

 

Mojo

1 cup olive oil

3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice

1/4 cup orange juice

2 tbs apricot jam

1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro

8 garlic cloves, minced

1 tablespoon grated orange peel

1 tablespoon dried oregano

2 1/2 teaspoons ground

cumin

 

Platano

2 Green Plantains

Corn Oil for Frying

 

Also need 

Salt and Pepper to taste

 

Prepare

Season short rib liberally with salt and pepper. Meanwhile, heat olive oil and bacon in heavy, oven-proof pan on medium heat. Once bacon starts rendering fat into the pan, add carrots, garlic, onion and jalapeño. Sweat for 5 minutes or until the onions are translucent.

Sear short ribs in pan, working in batches to not crowd pan. If pan starts to look dry, add olive oil. Once all sides of every short rib are browned, deglaze pan with red wine and add cola. Let simmer for 10 minutes on stove to reduce.

Meanwhile, prepare the mojo by adding all ingredients but the olive oil in a blender. Slowly increase blend speed to reach about 4 out of 10. Slowly add olive oil through the top until the sauce becomes the consistency of smooth salsa.

Once cola is reduced by half add beef broth, thyme, rosemary and place entire pan (with top) into a 325° oven and braise for 4 hours. Remove short ribs and add flour to braising components to make jam. Stir ingredients for 4-5 minutes or until ingredients bind together.

Prepare platanos by slicing plantain, frying in 350° oil until light brown, smashing with side of a knife and then frying again until crispy (about 2 mins).

Grill short rib for 2-3 mins just to add final touch of smoke and fire to the meat. Then plate by adding platano and mojo to plate topped with meat and bacon jam.

 

WATCH

Our Military Alarm Clock is guaranteed to wake the dead!

Today’s special offer is guaranteed to wake you up in time to get more of our special offers!


Here at the Mighty Value Center, we provide only the best quality, top-of-the-line products developed from extensive research on the front lines and delivered right to your door.

After decades of hazing, pranks, and general tomfoolery, military scientists have discovered the secret to waking up on time — every time.

Veteran salesman Greg Hahn brings you the ability to wake the living, the dead, and everything in between! Forget a snooze button, you’ll never be late again with our specially patented Military Alarm Clock (beating stick not included).

Wake up and act now! Supplies are limited.

WATCH

This soldier was awarded the Medal of Honor for leading bayonet charges in Korea

Lewis Millett was a man who was in love with war. He fought in World War II, Korea, and Vietnam.


Millett started out in the Massachusetts National Guard in 1938 with the 101st Field Artillery. In 1940 he joined the Army Air Corps and went to gunnery school.

But when Roosevelt came out and said that Americans would not be fighting on foreign soil, Millett was more than a little disappointed. So he deserted in 1941.

Millett hitchhiked to Canada and enlisted in the Canadian Army and was promptly sent to the UK, where he served as an anti-aircraft radar operator during the Blitz. Of course, after he got to London, America entered World War II — and Millett turned around and tried to transfer back into the US Army.

Thus began a long and storied career in the US military, including his fabled bayonet charges in the Korean War when he wanted to prove a point.

You can learn more about Lewis Millett on the We Are The Mighty podcast! Check it out here.

Do Not Sell My Personal Information