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These battleship vets bring the USS North Carolina back to life through combat stories

The USS North Carolina was what they called a "fast" battleship, designed for long range shooting matches with other ships of war. She was faster than any other ship in the U.S. fleet when she was built.


"I was 17 when I came aboard this thing," says James Bowen, a World War II veteran and USS North Carolina sailor. "I saw that thing and said 'Nothing can hurt me on that thing.' So I think of this as my second mother."

"It brings back a lot of memories, if you walk around the ventilators," says Louis Popovich, another USS North Carolina veteran. "It's amazing how you can be reminded of an area by breathing some of the air."

By the end of WWII, submarine warfare and aircraft carriers made the more expensive heavy gun warships like North Carolina all but obsolete. The last use of a battleship in combat was in Desert Storm, but by then they were firing Tomahawk missiles. Slowly over the next 50 years, the battleships of WWII were decommissioned one by one.

The North Carolina was opened to the public in 1963 and is now moored at Wilmington, N.C, where those interested in hearing more stories from the men who fought aboard her can visit.

While the ship will be there for the foreseeable future, the veterans' firsthand stories will not. An estimated 430 WWII veterans die every day and by 2036, they will all be gone — but not forgotten.