MIGHTY HISTORY

George Washington was voted Britain's 'Greatest Enemy Commander'

In 2012, Britain's National Army Museum organized a contest asking its patrons which of Britain's historical enemies was their greatest foe? The answer turned out to be the man who, almost through sheer force of will, and despite a lack of trained and equipped troops, organized the worst defeat the British Empire ever suffered. Ever.

The man was George Washington.


"Give us this firecake and I'll bring forth on this continent a new nation."

When considering the winner of the contest, the museum took into account Washington's spirit of endurance against the odds stacked in the British Empire's favor and the enormous impact of his victory – not in the two centuries to come but in the immediate aftermath.

"His personal leadership was crucial," said historian Stephen Brumwell, who called the American victory the Empire's worst defeat. "His army was always under strength, hungry, badly supplied. He shared the dangers of his men. Anyone other than Washington would have given up the fight. He came to personify the cause, and the scale of his victory was immense."

And he made Cornwallis walk next to his horse after Yorktown, apparently. Ballsy.

Each possible commander must have led an army against British forces in combat, which ruled out enemies like Adolf Hitler. Candidates must also have been within the National Army Museum's timeframe of the 17th century onwards, which ruled out enemies like William the Conqueror, who actually conquered Britain and changed Western Civilization forever.

The 8,000-plus votes in the survey put Washington well above other notable British enemies, such as Napoleon Bonaparte, Irish Independence leader Michael Collins, Nazi Field Marshal Erwin Rommel, and Turkish founding father Mustafa Kemal Ataturk.