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The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

Though one wouldn’t expect much from an armored vehicle developed by the Food Machinery Corporation, the M113 has become ubiquitous on the battlefield. In nearly 60 years of service, the M113 has found its way into the inventories of over 20 different countries and served in war zones across the globe.


As various militaries realized the utility of the platform, they greatly modified them for their own needs. Here are 9 of the coolest examples:

1. Armored Cavalry Assault Vehicle

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
M113 armored cavalry assault vehicle with three machine gun turrets (two M60 / one M2 Browning .50″). (Photo: U.S. Army)

Early in its service in Vietnam, it became apparent that the M113 needed to be more than just a “battle taxi” — it needed to bring some guns to the fight. To remedy this, Vietnamese, and later American, units made field-expedient improvements that led to the development of the Armored Cavalry Assault Vehicle, or ACAV.

Mounting a single .50 caliber machine gun and two M60’s behind armored gun shields, the ACAV became a rolling gun platform that could deliver massive firepower.

2. M132 Armored Flamethrower

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
M132 Armored Flamethrower on display at the War Remnants Museum. (Photo: Wikimedia Commons)

The jungles of Vietnam led to another development of the M113 — the M132 Flamethrower. Replacing the cupola with a flame turret and filling the passenger compartment with 200 gallons of flame fuel, the M132 was the mechanized equivalent of a fire-breathing dragon.

3. Missile Launcher

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
(US Army Photo)

Numerous countries used the M113 platform to launch missiles, particularly anti-aircraft missiles. But, for the United States the M113 would join the nuclear triad when it was modified as a Transporter Erector Launcher (TEL) for the Pershing I nuclear missile system. Other modified 113’s served as support vehicles in these operations.

4. Medium Reconnaissance Vehicle

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

M113 Medium Reconnaissance Vehicle in the Puckapunyal Army Camp, Victoria, Australia. (Photo: Wiki user Bukvoed)

Almost as soon as the Australians received the M113’s, they began splicing them together with other components. First, they took the turrets from their retiring Saladin armored cars and mounted them on the M113 to make the Fire Support Vehicle.

This vehicle was just an interim measure, though, while the Medium Reconnaissance Vehicle was being developed. This vehicle used the newer turret from British FV101 Scorpion tanks along with upgrades to the hull.

5. Air Defense Anti-Tank System

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
The Air Defense Anti-Tank System (ADATS) is a dual-purpose short range surface-to-air and anti-tank missile system based on the M113A2 vehicle. The ADATS missile is a laser-guided supersonic missile with a range of 10 kilometres, with an electro-optical sensor with TV and Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR). The carrying vehicle also has a conventional two-dimensional radar with an effective range of over 25 kilometres. (Photo from Wikimedia Commons)

The Air Defense Anti-Tank System, or ADATS, was a unique dual-purpose system designed to fight low flying aircraft and oncoming tanks. The Canadians mounted it on the ever-versatile M113 for mobility purposes. Armed with eight missiles and a power search radar, this created a formidable piece of defensive equipment.

6. M163 VADS

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
Crewmen stand in the hatches of an M163 Vulcan self-propelled anti-aircraft gun of the 24th Infantry Division (Mechanized) during an exercise at the National Training Center. The M163 consists of an M168 Vulcan 20 mm cannon with radar fire control mounted on a modified M113 armored personnel carrier. (U.S. Army photo)

The United States used the M113 for a variety of anti-aircraft platforms, but the coolest was the M163 VADS.

VADS, or Vulcan Air Defense System, was the anti-aircraft platform for the M61 20mm Gatling Gun used in American fighter aircraft. With all systems mounted on the venerable M113, the VADS, in conjunction with short-range missile systems, provided a highly mobile and deadly effective anti-aircraft system.

In Israeli service, the VADS was credited with downing a MiG 21 while under heavy fire and transitioning from ground targets to aerial.  

7. Arisgator

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
An Arisgator on display in Rome. (Photo by Heinz Guderian)

In the late 1990s, the Italian defense firm ARIS SpA made one of the most radical modifications to the M113 by making it fully ship-to-shore capable.

The M113 was always designed to be amphibious but the modifications made by ARIS, known as the Arisgator, put the M113 in league with the USMC’s Amtracs. Buoyancy was improved by adding a long bow section as well as two stern sections that also mounted propellers to move the 113 through the water.  

8. Danish Mk I/Egyptian Infantry Fighting Vehicle

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
The Danish M113A2 MK I DK (Wildcat).

What do you get when you mount a Swiss autocannon and a German machine gun in an Italian turret and marry that to and American APC?

You get Denmark’s version of the M113, known as the Mk I. Mounting a Oerlikon-Contraves 25mm autocannon, a German MG3 coaxial 7.62mm machine gun, and an Italian Oto Melara turret with advanced optics the Danes got an IFV just to their liking.

In the same vein, but uniquely more American, the Egyptians upgraded their large fleet of 113’s with the powerful turret assembly from the M2 Bradley to create the Egyptian Infantry Fighting Vehicle.

9. Armored Infantry Fighting Vehicle

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
Soldiers from 2nd platoon, E-company, Battle Group 7, Task Force Uruzgan move toward Mirabad in an YPR765 armored infantry fighting vehicle. (ISAF photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class John Collins, U.S. Navy)

The Armored Infantry Fighting Vehicle, or AIFV, was initially sought by the United States Army for its own Infantry Fighting Vehicle but when the M2 Bradley was chosen instead other governments picked up the idea.

The AIFV uses a modified M113 platform and mounts a one-man turret with a 25mm autocannon and a 7.62mm machine gun set behind the engine on the vehicle’s right side. The crew compartment holds seven troops, facing out, with five firing ports for mounted fighting.

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The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week

The staff at WATM sorts through the interwebs to find you the very best military memes out there. Here are our 13 picks for this week:


Snipers: The Waldoes of the military.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
Don’t worry if you can’t find them. They’ll find you.

Remember to properly secure your firearms and Marines.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
Don’t worry, guys. It probably won’t be long.

Ingenuity means different things to different people.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
(If you want to make fun of them, use small words so they get it.)

This is unfair and inaccurate:

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
We all know SEALs start with book deals and then sell the movie rights later.

If you don’t need fixing, basic training will be easy.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
Trust me, though, we all needed some fixing . . .

Speaking of drill sergeants, they’re arriving with your wake up call.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
Your wake-up call will be at zero-dark thirty.

I can’t relax if I don’t feel safe.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
It’s called position improvement, and if we get attacked you’ll stop complaining.

Finally, camouflage for the Navy (a.k.a. “aquaflage”) makes sense.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

 Reflective belts in the military are like car keys for teenagers.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
You can’t go anywhere without them, the older crowd uses them to control you, and you lose them every time you want to leave.

 Air Force marksmanship training focuses on real world skills.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
(But don’t worry, you won’t ever get in a real firefight.)

 Bring every item, even the ones you weren’t issued.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
You’ll also be unpacking it at every stop for inspections. And when we get in-country. And a few more times because first sergeant wants to see it. By the way, the packing list isn’t final.

 Air Force: Military lite.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
Notice how the Coast Guard didn’t occur to either of them?

Keep updating social media, ISIS.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
We can target off of your pictures. Please, send more.

NOW: The Hilarious Result Of Mashing Up Left Shark With Famous Military Quotes

And: 11 Things New Soldiers Complain About During Basic Training

Articles

The 13 funniest military memes of the week

More memes about the military. We hope you appreciate all the effort it takes to scroll through the internet finding these.


1. That’s a pretty nice car for an E1 (via Sh-t My LPO Says).

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
Some shady salesman got a nice bonus from that financing.

2. The Army trains to overcome the natural fear of death.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
The Navy trains to overcome vertigo while drunk.

SEE ALSO: 5 insane military projects that almost happened

3. For those who don’t know, MCT is combat school for non-infantry Marines.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
So this is one motivated, boot POG.

4. “War is Hell …”

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

5. That’s right, this guy is tougher than Katniss.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
No big deal or nuthin’.

6. That’s one salty giraffe (via Sh-t My LPO Says).

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
I’d pay good money to see this as a kids’ cartoon.

7. Rip Its: When they absolutely have to die tonight … (Via OIF/OEF Veterans)

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
… and their friends have to be dead by morning.

8. Combat Camera: No fire limits, no limits of advance …

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
… and absolutely no effects on target.

9. The Coast Guard has intelligence sailors? (Via Coast Guard Memes.)

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
Pretty great set-up for the sea police.

10. “Combat.” (Via Military Memes.)

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
They can probably get a Combat Action Badge for hitting a mouse with a mower.

11. It’s the only way the sailors will go down for their naps (via Sh-t My LPO Says).

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
Remember to keep a petty officer around to kiss all the boo-boos better.

 12. “I thought we started at morale bedrock.”

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

13. Chaos 6 has a reputation.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
No one should test it.

NOW: 24 historic photos made even more amazing with color

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Lists

Here’s what it’s like when Special Forces raid a compound

Few groups in the U.S. military are as revered as Army Special Forces. They slip into other countries and work with the locals to build up friendly forces and take down enemies. Here’s what it looks like when they strike a compound.


1. Operators prepare for the insertion, rehearsing if possible, before getting into their vehicles or transportation.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
Photo: US Army Staff Sgt. Shane Hamann

2. The soldiers then move to the target area. Walking allows them to move up quietly, but riding in ground vehicles or helicopters can allow them to strike quickly without warning.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
Special Forces candidates ride to a compound during training at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Photo: US Army Sgt. Justin P. Morelli

3. The Special Forces soldiers insert as quickly as they can, trying to get into a combat footing before the enemy can respond to their arrival.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
Special Forces candidates fast rope out of a UH-60 Blackhawk during training. Photo: US Army Sgt. Justin P. Morelli

4. The soldiers then move to their entry point and prepare to breach.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
A Special Forces soldier attaches a breaching charge to a door during training. Photo: US Army Visual Information Specialist Ruediger Hess

5. Once they’re through the door, they start securing the target buildings.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
Photo: US Army Sgt. 1st Class Silas Toney

6. Multi-story buildings in a compound have to be searched floor-by-floor. Whenever possible, they try to work from the top down.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
Photo: US Army Sgt. 1st Class Silas Toney

7. Soldiers pull security on the perimeter so the enemy can’t come in behind the SF team.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
Photo: US Army Sgt. 1st Class Silas Toney

8. Most of the operators carry rifles, but they bring some larger weapons like the Carl Gustav recoilless rifle with them to destroy enemy vehicles or shoot through some walls.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
Photo: US Army Sgt. Justin Morelli

9. Once the compound has been taken, soldiers have to pull security to prevent an enemy counterattack while the team is still on the ground.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
Photo: US Army Spc. Sara Wakai

10. After searching the compound for intelligence and weapons, the operators will make their way back out of the compound.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
Special Forces candidates maneuver out of a compound during training. Photo: US Army Sgt. Justin P. Morelli

11. If an enemy has been taken captive, they’ll be removed with the team back to the helicopter or vehicles.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
Special Forces operators drag a simulated captive off an objective during training. Photo: US Army Sgt. 1st Class Silas Toney

12. The security teams stay at the edges of the compound until the last possible moment so the team remains safe from a counterattack.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
Photo: US Army Sgt. Daniel Love

13. When they make it back to their transportation, the SF operators will leave the compound.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
Special Forces candidates climb into a Blackhawk helicopter as they depart a compound at the end of a training mission. Photo: US Army Sgt. Justin P. Morelli

14. The team will then study any intelligence they’ve collected and question any prisoners taken in the operation. The new intelligence will generate new missions and raids.

NOW: The definitive guide to US special ops

OR: Here’s what it looks like when paratroopers jump out of a helicopter

Articles

17 beautiful photos of troops training in the snow

Baby, it’s cold outside. But U.S. troops are still expected to use snow storms during peace as great training for snow storms during war.


So while the rest of the country starts sipping spiced coffees and hot chocolate, here are 17 photos of America’s troops braving the snow:

1. Airman 1st Class Avery Friedman plays “Taps” during training at F.S. Gabreski Air National Guard Base amid snowfall on Dec. 15.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
(Photo: U.S. Air National Guard Staff Sgt. Christopher S. Muncy)

2. Paratroopers scan for threats past purple smoke while maneuvering through the snow during a training exercise in Alaska on Nov. 8.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
(Photo: U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Javier Alvarez)

3. Paratroopers maneuver across the snow at the top of a hill during training in Alaska on Nov. 8.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
(Photo: U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Javier Alvarez)

4. Apache crew chiefs perform maintenance on an AH-64E during a snowstorm at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington, on Dec. 8, 2016.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
(Photo: U.S. Army Capt. Brian Harris)

5. Maintenance sailors change the prop on an EP-3E Aries II amid driving snow at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island on Dec. 11.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
(Photo: U.S. Navy)

6. An Airman removes snow and ice from a KC-135 Stratotanker on Dec. 12 after a snowstorm at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
(Photo: U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Mackenzie Richardson)

7. A B-52H pilot gives the thumbs up to ground crew from inside the cockpit before a training flight through the snow on Jan. 14, 2016.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
(Photo: U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class J.T. Armstrong)

8. An Air Force engineer drives a snow plow across the flightline at Minot Air Force Base, North Dakota, on Jan. 14, 2016.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
(Photo: U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class J.T. Armstrong)

9. A 10th Mountain Division soldier clears snow from parked Humvees at Fort Drum, New York, on Nov. 21.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
(Photo: U.S. Army Spec. Liane Schmersahl)

10. Army paratroopers conduct a live-fire training exercise at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska on Nov. 8, 2016.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
(Photo: U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Javier Alvarez)

11. A Marine Corps rifleman pulls security during training at Fort A.P. Hill, Virginia, on Jan. 29, 2016.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
(Photo: U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Samuel Guerra)

12. A Marine Corps mortarman sits with his weapon on Oct. 22, 2016, during training at the Mountain Warfare Training Center, Bridgeport, California.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
(Photo: U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Timothy Valero)

13. A Coast Guard petty officer clears snow from around a 25-foot Response Boat-Small on Jan. 24, 2016, in Sandy Hook, New Jersey.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
(Photo: U.S. Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Richard Clarke, III)

14. Army soldiers fire a 120mm mortar during training at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, on Jan. 12, 2016.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
(Photo: U.S. Army John Pennell)

15. Army paratroopers in Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, conduct 60mm mortar training in the snow on Jan. 12, 2016.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
(Photo: U.S. Army John Pennell)

16. An Army mortarman moves through the snow during training at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson on Jan. 12, 2016.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
(Photo: U.S. Army John Pennell)

17. An Air Force engineer drives a snow broom across the runway at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, on Dec. 4, 2015.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
(Photo: U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Shawn Nickel)

Lists

4 ways you can tell the firefight in Afghanistan is over — for now

There are two types of firefights that ground troops experience: fun ones and others that suck.


The fun ones consist of taking enemy contact, maneuvering in on them, and clearing them out with tons of firepower without any good guys injured.

The ones that suck are the few that we don’t see coming — the ones where we take casualties. Although predicting when a firefight is going to happen is semi-possible, it’s a different skill altogether to know when they’re about to end.

Related: 14 images that portray your first day on a field op

So, check four ways you can tell when the firefight in Afghanistan is over — for now.

4. After an A-10 performs a perfectly executed gun run

During a firefight, it’s common for the platoon sergeant to call for air support if there is “air-on-station,” especially when the enemy is firing at you from a well-fortified position.

Witnessing the power of the A-10 nose-diving toward the enemy with its guns blazing is an excellent way to end the firefight for a while.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
We love that song.

3. When the local kids come back out to play

We’re not exactly sure how this one works, but right before rounds start flying, the locals tend to seek cover. Again, we’re not sure how it happens, but somehow the kids know when the area is clear and they come back outside and resume playing.

It’s crazy!

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
Afghan children play soccer with multinational service members outside the Bazaar School at Kandahar Airfield, Kandahar, Afghanistan, Sept. 25, 2010. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Tracy Hohman)

2. When the intel troops arrive to conduct a BDA

Most of the military’s intel offices have access to satellites and view enemy activity from space. Typically, when a grunt unit is assigned to conduct a BDA, or Battle Damage Assessment, after a firefight, that means the coast is clear.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
U.S. Army Capt. DeShane Greaser stands in a crater caused by a bomb dropped during an air strike conducting a Battle Damage Assessment outside a combat outpost in Afghanistan. (Image from Wikimedia Commons)

Also Read: 6 questions you asked yourself after your first firefight

1. When it’s getting close to prayer time

Islam is a beautiful religion and the men and women who loyally follow the practice pray five times. Since prayer takes place throughout the day, ground troops commonly schedule missions and patrols according to those times.

It’s been frequently noted that firefights come to a quick halt if they overlap with prayer schedules.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
Muslim Soldiers bow down in prayer during the celebration of Eid-Al-Fitr Sunday at the Joe E. Mann Center. Eid-Al-Fitr marks the end of Ramadan, the holy month for Muslims worldwide. (Photo from U.S. Army)

Articles

33 technical errors in the movie ‘Three Kings’

“Three Kings” looks at what would happen if Army reservists and a retiring special forces officer decided to steal millions of dollars in gold under the nose of their headquarters.


Before we get started, we didn’t count each individual case of “accountability” issues in this movie because it simply comes up too often to list each individual problem. But, the movie centers on the idea that a staff officer, two mid-career noncommissioned officers, and a private could disappear into the desert for hours with a Humvee, M60, and some M16s and pistols, and return hours later with no one noticing.

No actual soldier would have thought this plan would work. Sergeants are being yelled at, asked a question, or assigned a task every five minutes. No way they could disappear for hours and no one would notice.

Plot impossibility aside, there were 33 technical errors that made us grind our teeth.

1. (1:10) Sgt. 1st Class Barlow asks whether or not the unit is shooting at Iraqis. As a sergeant first class with a small element, he is probably the senior-most enlisted soldier in this scene. He should be the one who knows the rules of engagement. Also, what patrols really go outside the wire without briefing the RoE? The Army Reserve sometimes does dumb stuff but damn.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

2. (1:35) Barlow wants to ascertain whether a person has a weapon. First of all, the guy was literally waving it through the air multiple times, silhouetting it to where Barlow should be able to tell the exact kind of Kalashnikov it is. Secondly, instead of just looking he flips his iron sites to the pinhole site (which it should’ve been on in the first place). This would actually make it harder to see if the enemy had a weapon.

3. (4:50) A major wouldn’t call his superior “colonel.”

4. (5:08) Major Gates is wearing his skill badges incorrectly. Army Regulation 670-1 says that when four skill badges are worn on the Desert BDU, the first three are worn above the U.S. Army tape and the fourth is worn on the pocket flap. Gates has two above the tape and two on the pocket flap. The colonel’s badges are, surprisingly, in the right spots though the spacing looks a little iffy.

5. (5:30) That colonel must be very busy if he’s going to let an ass-chewing wait until morning.

6. (7:09) Holding your weapon close to a prisoner is begging to have it stolen and used against you, but the private does it with nearly every prisoner.

7. (9:42) The colonel puts on his hat to get in a helicopter. This is the opposite of what you’re supposed to do. Also, does he really not need armor to fly outside the wire? He better hope that cease fire is super secure.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

8. (12:40) Night vision in Desert Storm didn’t blur peripheral vision, it blocked it. Also, during the day, the image would be blown out and the light could ruin the device.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

9. (12:50) Soldiers don’t salute indoors and rarely salute while deployed.

10. (17:30) No one notices the soldiers shooting rounds at footballs? And no one noticed them leaving base without armor or helmets?

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

11. (27:18) Major remembers that he saw soldiers guarding a well. Why didn’t he put two and two together while he was still in the village?

12. (28:30) What the hell is with the dune buggy? The Army doesn’t have those. And there is no way the security in the country is so good that a commander would let a soldier leave the base alone with two civilians. A single Humvee would have been unlikely to be released as well, even with a Special Forces officer “commanding” the movement.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

13. (40:13) Multiple weapons can be heard charging, but the soldiers are only switching off their safeties.

14. (43:50) They see a tank and Pfc. Vig pulls a light anti-tank weapon. These guys are civil affairs reservists. It’s guaranteed that guy does not know how to use that weapon. It’s pretty shocking that he even has it.

15. (45:55) The reservist knew exactly where his LAW was, but not the mask that should have been strapped to his leg.

16. (46:05) Vig survives a massive mine blast at only a few meters. Nope.

17. (48:30) CS gas is not uncomfortable in heavy clouds, it is debilitating. Even tough soldiers tear up, cough heavily, and struggle for breath.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

18. (49:20) “Where’s Troy?” would not be answered with, “We have to get out of here.” A missing soldier is a huge deal and this is their best chance to fix it.

19. (51:07) The rebels are not taking a tank. They’re taking an armored personnel carrier. You are a damn soldier and should know better.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

20. (57:14) “Get the maps, check their radio transmissions. Maybe we’ll get their positions.” So, the colonel thinks he’ll find his rogue special forces major by checking the radio traffic. That makes sense. He lied about where he was, who he was taking to, and what he was doing, but he definitely called and gave his real position on the radio.

21. (1:08:55) A special forces officer is leading a massive foot movement of rebels and lets them silhouette themselves on top of a ridge.

22. (1:15:15) The colonel is personally leading the search for missing soldiers. A subordinate officer should really be in charge and reporting up to him.

23. (1:22:50) Vig was once again way too close to an explosion to live.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

24. (1:21:55) This helicopter manages to fire on the rebels three times and not hit anything until the third pass. Then, all of a sudden he kills a few people with almost every run, culminating in flying sideways while gunning a guy down. Are they badass pilots or incompetent? Pick one.

25. (1:26:15) What are the triggering mechanisms on these footballs? The first went off when it was shot, which C4 is not designed to do. The second went off on a timer. The third one went off when it impacted a helicopter. A timer makes sense but the other two need some explanation.

26. (1:30:40) When you shoot a guy to make sure he’s dead, you should really put at least one in his skull. Then he won’t shoot your buddy through the lung in exactly 59 seconds.

27. (1:32:55) Where was Maj. Gates hiding every item needed to perform a needle chest decompression?

28. (1:33:50) No, a needle chest decompression will not treat a shot up lung so well that you can just release the tension with the valve every few minutes. It makes it to where you can leave the valve open and barely breath as you are immediately moved to a hospital.

29. (1:37:45) If the colonel is special forces, it’s pretty weird that he’s commanding a unit in conventional forces.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

30. (1:39:30) Put up your troop strap, morons. I know you’re a bunch of thieves, but you still need to be safe.

31. (1:40:30) There is never a good reason to leave your most casualty-producing weapon unmanned.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

32. (1:41:00) Maj. Gates says only American soldiers carry guns. That’s probably offensive to the French special forces soldier who is saving his ass.

33. Epilogue: Everyone who wasn’t killed has a happy ending with new jobs and a peaceful existence after they are honorably discharged. No. A soldier was killed and a humvee and M60 are missing along with a few M16s and M9s. No. You all went to jail.

NOW: 15 Unforgettable photos from Operation Desert Storm

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The 7 types of SNCOs in every military unit

Not all staff non-commissioned officers are created equal.


Across branches and job descriptions, most senior enlisted leaders develop their own unique personalities and leadership styles. But that doesn’t mean they don’t sometimes fall into certain archetypes, from “drill instructor” to “guidance counselor.”

In just about every unit, you’ll find these personality types for SNCO’s.

1. The drill instructor

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EHNTufCZmH4

Paying close attention to details and quick to correct even the slightest mistake, “the drill instructor” maintains order through fear, respect, and constantly demanding maximum effort. They are so passionate about maintaining order and discipline that they may be willing to lose their bearing to achieve it, as demonstrated by the sergeant major in the video above who demanded a Marine veteran take off the drill instructor campaign cover during a protest.

2. The career cruiser

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

Also known as “retired on active duty,” these are the SNCO’s on the backend of their career who are just skating by. With only a year or two left until their retirement date, the “career cruiser” is working hard to not work hard. Basically, they do just enough to get by and punch the clock until they can get out.

3. The cool parent

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

They view each and every one of their troops not just as subordinates but as their extended family and are very protective of each and every one of them. They give their personal number to all of their junior ranking troops so that if they ever find themselves in a questionable situation or need a ride at 0300 on a Saturday morning, they should feel comfortable knowing “the cool parent” will be there to help them out.

4. The guidance counselor

Most troops are young and inexperienced in not only their military careers but in life in general. These SNCO’s are always finding ways to give personal and group mentorship every chance they get, whether they need it or not. “The guidance counselor” helps junior troops advance in life and in their careers while keeping them motivated and mission-ready.

5. The super motivator

Their tone, posture, speed, intensity, and character is always a cut above the rest. No matter what your mood or level of motivation, after every interaction you have with this SNCO, you leave feeling more dedicated and proud to be wearing the uniform and your role in the unit’s mission.

6. The warrior-leader

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

Not one for talking, they are found doing. They have impeccable fitness, the highest qualifications scores, the highest standard of military bearing, and always mission ready, even while off duty. They exude confidence and their track record demands respect. Not one to shy from making tough decisions, they will always be found leading their men by example, like Sgt. Maj. Brad Kasal (pictured above), who earned a Navy Cross for his heroic actions in Fallujah.

7. The all-in-one

The SNCO that embodies all of the leadership traits. They are able to maximize the efforts and morale of everyone in their command, and are looked upon by their peers for guidance as masters in developing new leaders.  Everyone, from commanders to the most junior ranks, can count on them to make sound decisions and always have their best interests at heart.

NOW: This Green Beret’s heroism was so incredible that Ronald Reagan said it was hard to believe

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11 of the 21 laws for assassins

When author Robert B. Baer asked his boss at the CIA for the definition of assassination his boss replied, “It’s a bullet with a man’s name on it.” Baer wasn’t sure what that meant so he started to research the topic beyond what he already had experienced around it in his role at the CIA. The end of that process became his insightful and provocative new book, The Perfect Kill, in which he outlines 21 laws for assassins. Here are 11 of them:


Law #1: THE BASTARD HAS TO DESERVE IT

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
Painting of Caesar’s assassination by Vincenzo Camuccini, 1798.

“The victim must be a dire threat to your existence, in effect giving you license to murder him. The act can never be about revenge, personal grievance, ownership, or status.”

Law #2: MAKE IT COUNT

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
(Photo: Lens Young Dimashqi)

“Power is the usurpation of power, and assassination its ultimate usurpation. The act is designed to alter the calculus of power in your favor. If it won’t, don’t do it.”

Law #5: ALWAYS HAVE A BACKUP FOR EVERYTHING

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

“Count on the most important pieces of a plan failing at exactly the wrong moment. Double up on everything — two set of eyes, two squeezes of the trigger, double-prime charges, two traitors in the enemy’s camp.”

Law # 7: RENT THE GUN, BUY THE BULLET

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

“Just as there are animals that let other animals do their killing for them — vultures and hyenas — employ a trusted proxy when one’s available.”

Law #8: VET YOUR PROXIES IN BLOOD

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
The assassination of Egyptian President Anwar Sadat on October 6, 1981.

“Assassination is the most sophisticated and delicate form of warfare, only to be entrusted to the battle-hardened and those who’ve already made your enemy bleed.”

Law #9: DON’T SHOOT EVERYONE IN THE ROOM

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
President Lincoln shot by actor John Wilkes Booth at Ford’s Theater.

“Exercise violence with vigilant precision and care. Grievances are incarnated in a man rather than in a tribe, nation, or civilization. Blindly and stupidly lashing out is the quickest way to forfeit power.”

Law #15: DON’T MISS

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
British sniper team in action in Afghanistan.

“It’s better not to try rather than to try and miss. A failed attempt gives the victim an aura of invincibility, augmenting his power while diminishing yours. Like any business, reputation is everything.”

Law #16: IF YOU CAN’T CONTROL THE KILL, CONTROL THE AFTERMATH

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
Jack Ruby shoots Lee Harvey Oswald in Dallas on November 24, 1963.

“A good, thorough cleanup is what really scares the shit out of people.”

Law #17: HE WHO LAUGHS LAST SHOOTS FIRST

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
Gavrilo Princip shoots Archduke Franz Ferdinand in Sarajevo in 1914, the act that torched off World War I.

“You’re the enemy within, which mean there’s never a moment they’re not trying to hunt you down to exterminate you. Hit before it’s too late.”

Law # 19: ALWAYS HAVE AN ENCORE IN YOUR POCKET

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

“Power is the ability to hurt something over and over again. One-offs get you nothing or less than nothing.”

Law #21: GET TO IT QUICKLY

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
Predator firing Hellfire missile. (Photo: U.S. Air Force)

“Don’t wait until the enemy is too deeply ensconced in power or too inured to violence before acting. He’ll easily shrug off the act and then come after you with a meat cleaver.”

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

For the rest of Robert B. Baer’s 21 laws for assassins, buy his amazing book here.

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4 ways nicknames in the military are nothing like in pop culture

Movies would have you believe that every unit has a guy nicknamed “Hawkeye” or “Snake” or some other generic, tough name. As fun as films and video games make those monikers seem, it just doesn’t work that way in real life.

In actuality, nicknames fall into one of four categories: Either the troop is a freakin’ legend, it’s the unit’s name plus a number or letter, it’s just a shortened version of their last name, or it’s an insult in disguise.

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://assets.rbl.ms/17941332/980x.jpg image-library=”0″ pin_description=”” caption=”Unless you’re a BAMF, don’t expect an awesome one.” crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//assets.rbl.ms/17941332/980x.jpg%22%7D” alt=”saint mattis of quantico” expand=1 photo_credit=”(OAF Nation)”] (OAF Nation)


The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

Even with all of The Punisher swag that Chris Kyle wore, he never insisted that anyone call him “The Punisher” — even if he was one of the few people on Earth worthy of that title.

The legends

Let’s kick this list off with the freakin’ legends. Take Secretary of Defense James “Warrior Monk” Mattis for example. He’s a highly revered military mind within the U.S. Armed Forces and his nickname reflects that.

As is the case with most nicknames, they’re typically invented and popularized by others — not by the legends themselves. These nicknames are even more intimidating when they’re created by the enemy. Chris “the Legend” Kyle, for example, was known as “Al-Shaitan Ramad,” which translates into “the Devil of Ramadi.”

The reason why both Kyle and Mattis have such badass nicknames is because they earned them.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

Why, yes. They do call me “Romeo” for a reason…

(Photo by Cpl. Charles Santamaria)

Call signs

People often confuse nicknames with call signs, so let’s hash the difference right now. Call signs are official unit designations given to members of the chain of command. Sometimes, a call sign will become more familiar than your own name.

If you’re, let’s say, the company commander of the alpha company “Spartans,” you’ll get the designation of “Spartan 6.” The XO gets “Spartan 5,” Senior Enlisted gets “Spartan 7,” and so on. Drivers, gunners, and radio operators can swap out the number designation for D, G, and R, respectively.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

“Hey, Ski!” “…which one?”

(Photo by Sgt. Lauren Harrah)

Butchered last name

The next nickname variation is especially terrible if your last name is anything outside of the standard, common English name. Unless you’re a “Smith” or a “Brown” or a “Johnson,” no one is going to try to pronounce what’s on your name tape — no matter how phonetically simple it may seem.

A whole nine letters broken into three syllables — you know, something simple like Milzarski (pronounced Mil-zar-ski) is too complicated. So, most will just shorten it to “Ski.” Good luck if there’s more than one Polish troop in the squad. Not that I’m ranting or anything…

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

If it’s dumb and it sounds like an insult, don’t take it personally. It’s meant with brotherly love.

(U.S. Army)

Remember when you screwed up?

The most common way to get yourself a nickname of your very own is to f*ck up. Don’t worry if it’s not a record-shattering mistake — people will constantly remind you of what you did. It’s not pleasant and it’s usually a way to rib one another, but you don’t want to be known as “Fumbles” by everyone.

Don’t worry if you get one of these dumb names. It’ll pass as soon as you PCS or ETS.

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Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military

Most people know about military working dogs, but there are some lesser known creatures that also conduct missions for the U.S. military:


1. Honeybees

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DF9_y5v_A3M
Honeybees can smell explosives and other compounds nearly as well as dogs can, so researchers have begun training bees in bomb detection. The bees are trained to believe that sugar water is typically located near TNT. Once they make the association between TNT and sugar, they can be employed in two ways.

First, they can be restricted to glass tubes at check points. When people, cars, and packages are moved through the checkpoint, handlers watch the bees to see if they start moving their proboscis, a feeding tube that is part of their mouth. Movement in multiple bees is a sure sign that explosives are in the area. Alternatively, the bees can be fitted with radio transponders and released into a large area. Handlers then watch on computer screens to see where the bees swarm to and then check that spot for a mine.

2. Dolphins and Sea Lions

Though they’re slowly being replaced by drones, the Navy still uses trained dolphins and sea lions to hunt for mines and enemy swimmers. The animals are trained over a number of years and then deployed in vulnerable harbors, marking the mines and swimmers for human personnel to clear or capture. The aquatic mammals mark divers by attaching devices to their scuba tanks or limbs. They mark mines by attaching a cable or buoy to the mine. The mammals have been deployed to Vietnam, the Persian Gulf, and both U.S. coasts.

One team of dolphins and handlers in the program, MK8, can deploy ahead of an amphibious landing group and indicate safe routes for ships, Marines, and other forces.

3. Mules

The Marine Corps has come up with a few innovative ideas for resupplying forward Marines, including stepping back to the days of pack animals and running mules. Mules were used in Afghanistan and the Marines maintain a training program at the Mountain Warfare Training Center in Bridgeport, California to prepare troops to use pack animals overseas.

4. Insect cyborgs

Currently going through development and testing in various DARPA programs, cyborg insects are designed for disaster relief and search-and-rescue missions. The bugs; muscles are controlled through implants. Researchers are experimenting with different power sources for the rig and any sensors strapped to the bug. One option that has been tested is nuclear cyborg bugs, where a low-radioactivity isotope is slowly broken down to power transmitters.

5. Horses

Most horse units were transitioned to mechanized in the lead up to World War II, and almost every U.S. horse unit has been shut down. But, there is an active law enforcement horse patrol in the U.S. Air Force. At Vandenberg Air Force Base, police have to clear launchpads and the surrounding area during missile launches and some of the area is too rough for ATVs. Also, patrols of the 40 miles of beach cannot always be done with vehicles due to a federally protected species that lives on the base. The horse patrols cover both the rough mountains and the beaches where vehicles can’t go. The U.S. also trains Marines and Special Forces to ride horses and other animals for certain operations.

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The 18 Military Facebook Pages You Should Be Following

Mat Best MBest11x

Why you should follow: Mat Best and the boys at Article 15 Clothing bring laughter in a way only veterans and active military personnel can relate to. They shoot anything that goes bang and make awesome videos.


The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

Duffel Blog

Why you should follow: Stay up-to-date with the U.S. military’s most-trusted* news source (If you aren’t aware, Duffel Blog is a parody news organization offering pitch perfect satire on military and veterans issues).

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

Terminal Lance

Why you should follow: A weekly comic strip started by a Marine veteran, Terminal Lance offers not only hilarious comic strips, but plenty of memes and funny photos that are submitted.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

Ranger Up Military and MMA Apparel

Why you should follow: These vets take funny jabs at all branches of the military. Meme War Fridays are the best!

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

Veterans in Film Television

Why you should follow: This is a must-follow page for all you veterans in the film and television industry. Learn of the latest networking, audition, and job opportunities here.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

Marines of Helmand and Al Anbar

Why you should follow: Connect with Marines who served in Helmand and Al Anbar and see what they’re up to.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

Afghanistan Combat Footage – Funker530

Why you should follow: Get the latest combat footage on your Facebook timeline.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

Arlington National Cemetary

Why you should follow: Get daily commemorative posts of troops who are buried at the cemetery.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

Military Working Dogs

Why you should follow: Learn what our latest K-9 war buddies are up to via photos, videos, and stories.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

USO – United Service Organizations

Why you should follow: This is a great page to follow if you’re currently serving. Get the latest military entertainment, programs, and services here.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

Awesome S- -t My Drill Sergeant Said

Why you should follow: Remember the crazy, off-the-wall, and hilarious stuff your drill sergeant said? Follow this page for comedy that only veterans and active troops would understand.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

Stolen Valor

Why you should follow: The official Guardians of Valor Facebook page. Follow this page to learn and report those who falsely claim military service and/or claim unauthorized medals or tabs.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

Operator as F- -k

Why you should follow: This is another great page for military humor. Get your funny military pictures and memes here.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

Make The Connection

Why you should follow: This is the official Make the Connection Facebook page. It’s an active page that connects veterans and their loved ones to stories of strength and resources for living well.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

NavySEALs.com

Why you should follow: Follow this page to get daily inspirational messages and SEAL stories.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

National Naval Aviation Museum

Why you should follow: Learn something new about the Navy’s aviation history every day.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

Tactical S- -t

Why you should follow: Learn about the latest tactical gear through reviews, videos and stories.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

U.S. Military On Facebook

Why you should follow: This is a great resource for military personnel, veterans, and their families.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113

NOW: 18 Terms Only Soldiers Will Understand

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4 of the worst things you can stalk through as a Scout Sniper

Scout Snipers are some of the most elite warfighters on the planet. Often serving a unit’s personal team of spy-assassins, they’re trained to be self-sufficient, resilient, and deadly silent.


Whether they’re sent to collect intelligence or precisely remove specific members of a certain population, you won’t know they’re there until it’s far too late. But snipers don’t have the ability to teleport to a vantage point (not yet, at least) — they have to get there somehow. That’s where stalking comes in.

It’s their way of getting from point A to point B while avoiding detection by the enemy on which they prey (hence the term ‘stalking’), and it can put them in some really uncomfortable situations.

Here are some of the worst things you can stalk through as a sniper.

Related: 7 things all troops should know before becoming a sniper

1. Your poop

When you need to go, you need to go. When you’re a sniper, there isn’t always time to dig a hole or find some nice spot to drop your payload. Sometimes, you just have to drop your trousers and go.

But, when you inevitably find yourself stalking through that same place a week or so later, you may forget about it for just long enough to realize you’re crawling right through it.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
Maybe write down the map coordinates so you know not to go through there. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Ricky S. Gomez)

2. Someone else’s poop

Hopefully, you’re stalking through someplace that offers plenty of concealment. Unfortunately, if it’s a good place for sneakin’, someone else may have been there before you. That someone, maybe an enemy, maybe a friend, might have felt the undying urge to let it go right then and there.

Again, you probably won’t even know it’s there until you’re laying directly on top of it.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
And this is the face you’ll make when you realize what’s happened. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by MCIPAC Combat Camera Lance Cpl. Juan C. Bustos)

3. Fire ants

Snipers are fearless and they feel no pain. But it’s still unpleasant to find a good spot to take a shot at your target and realize you’ve become one yourself — to a colony of angry fire ants.

They’re probably pissed that you just destroyed the mound they’ve been working on all day and now they have to rebuild — but they’ll probably sting you first.

Also read: This Marine Was The ‘American Sniper’ Of The Vietnam War

4. Frozen streams or ponds

When you find yourself stalking to a vantage point, depending on where you are in the world, there might be some bodies of water between you and your destination. So, it makes a lot of sense that you might have to go through the water to get to your objective.

Just make sure you have a dry set of clothes ready before you leave so you can immediately change when you come back… whenever that may be.

The 9 coolest things militaries have done with the M113
Any clime and place, right? (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Isaac Ibarra)

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