Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift - We Are The Mighty
MIGHTY FIT

Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift

If this is a question you’ve ever wondered, look no further. I’ve provided you with all the information you need in order to make the smartest decision for your unique situation, even if that situation is fat loss.

First, let’s look at the pros and cons of each movement.


Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift

A more horizontal back angle means more back involvement.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Piper A. Ballantine)

Conventional deadlift

The conventional deadlift is the answer to the question that asks: “Which movement allows me to move the most amount of weight with the most muscle mass over the longest range of motion.

It tends to work the hamstrings, back, and spinal erectors more than the sumo due to the more horizontal back angle of the starting position. Your hips are moving further, so the hip extensor muscles have more work to do.

If you have weak hamstrings and/poor hip flexibility, this movement will be harder. But that shouldn’t stop you from training it, The conventional deadlift will make you stronger in your hamstrings and more flexible in your hips over time.

Don’t switch to sumo just because your back hurts! Check this out first!

Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift

Notice how vertical the shins are and how close the hips are to the bar.

(Photo by Alora Griffiths on Unsplash)

Sumo deadlift

The sumo deadlift takes a lot of stress off of your low back due to the more vertical back angle that you start the movement with. If you’re trying to get more leg work in your training, but your back is smoked, the sumo deadlift may be the way to go.

The wide-legged stance of the sumo deadlift artificially shortens your leg length. This allows you to bend at the hips less and bend at the knees more than in the conventional deadlift. That’s why there’s much more quad involvement in the sumo deadlift.

You should think of it more like a skill that you must practice. The sumo deadlift tends to take longer to set up, especially if you want to be good at it. The goal is to get your hips as close to the bar as possible so that you can take your back out of the movement as much as possible and shorten the distance the bar has to travel to lockout as much as possible. Those two things are achieved through proper form of the skill of sumo deadlifting.

Here’s how the trap bar deadlift fits in for you curious soldiers.

Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift

That’s over 550 lbs lifted thanks to a strong posterior chain.

(U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Charles Highland)

The conventional deadlift is in a category of its own.

The deadlift, which is a hip hinge exercise, is uniquely designed to work the muscles of the posterior chain. Those muscles include the hamstrings, glutes, spinal erectors, lats, traps, and even calves. Those are the muscles you want to target when hip hinging.

In contrast, the sumo deadlift has a lot of quad involvement.

Often I’m asked if people should squat or deadlift. Conventional deadlift vs. sumo deadlift is a very similar question. Both the squat (especially high bar back squat and front squat) and the sumo deadlift recruit much more quad than the conventional deadlift.

This leaves the conventional deadlift in its own category. It lights up the entire back side of your body much more efficiently than any other lower body exercise. Especially if you perform it perfectly…

Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift

Make no mistake the sumo deadlift is still difficult.

(Photo by Alora Griffiths on Unsplash)

When to sumo deadlift

There are three times you can consider adding the sumo deadlift to your training.

  • If you compete at powerlifting and the sumo deadlift is approved, then you should probably sumo deadlift.
  • If you want to get more hamstring and glute work but your back is sore from conventional deadlifting. This option assumes that you are conventional deadlifting at another time throughout the week.
  • If you want to get more quad work in and CAN’T squat. This shouldn’t last very long in your training program. Not liking squatting isn’t a good enough reason.

There you go. There are absolutely times to sumo deadlift, but for the majority of us, that isn’t all that often.

To keep this conversation going, be sure to join the Mighty Fit FB Group here.

Also, don’t forget to start training with the Mighty Fit Plan (It’s got plenty of deadlifting included by the way.). There are some big changes coming to the Mighty Fit Plan very soon, and you’ll be the first to hear about them by signing up now!

Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift
Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift
MIGHTY FIT

5 steps to deadlift perfection

Picking up a fallen comrade, a young child, or a case of beer are all instances that you can train for in the gym, to ensure that when the time calls, you’re ready.

The deadlift gets its name because you start every rep from a dead stop off the floor, just like in the above scenarios. In order to deadlift, you need to set up properly. That means that every rep is the first rep. There is no way to build momentum or use stretch reflex to make it easier.


Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift

Good luck with a CASEVAC if you can’t properly pick up your fallen team member

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Paul Peterson/Released)

The deadlift is easily the most butchered exercise in the history of modern man. The following setup will ensure you skip all the common pitfalls and get to pulling 2x your body weight in no time.

Deadlift Step 1

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1. Stand with the bar over your mid-foot

Approach the bar, without touching it. Stand with your feet roughly shoulder width apart and slightly canted out, at about a 15-30 degree angle.

When you look down, the bar should be over your mid-foot.

Take into account your whole foot, not just the front part that you can see, but the whole foot from heel to toe.

Mid-foot, on most people, actually looks like it is about ¾ of the way back on your foot when you’re looking from above.

This is roughly 1 inch from your shin when standing up straight.

Deadlift Step 2

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2. Bend at your hips and take your grip

Don’t bend your knees yet.

Keeping your legs straight, bend over at your hips and grab the bar just outside of hip distance.

You want your grip to be as narrow as possible, but still wider than the legs, so they don’t get in the way of your knees as they bend.

The more narrow your grip, the longer your arms will be, and the shorter distance you will have to pull the bar.

Deadlift Step 3

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3. Bend at your knees and bring your shins to the bar

Up until this point, your shins should not have made contact with the bar.

Now that the bar, your stance, and your grip are locked into place you can bring your shins into position.

Bend your knees and point them out as much as possible.

They should be tracking out in the same direction as your feet.

Do not move the bar, your feet, or your grip!

Just bend your knees and bring your shins to the bar.

You’ll most likely feel like you are in an awkward position, as your hips will be higher than feels natural. This is correct.

Deadlift Step 4

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4. Squeeze your chest up and lock your back into position

Flexion in the back (like a crunch) is generally undesirable, especially when learning the deadlift.

Some upper back flexion is acceptable in competitive lifters. You are not a competitive lifter…yet

Lower back flexion is never acceptable.

Stick your chest out and think about bringing your belly to your ass. This cue sounds weird, but when you do it, you will be exactly where you need to be.

This is also when you should be taking your deep inhale and locking it in to give your more intra-abdominal pressure.

Lastly, you will be taking the slack out of the bar here. It is that clicking feeling of the inner bar hitting the roof of the sleeves on which the weights rest.

You will notice a distinct difference between the barbell resting on the ground and you “holding” the weight in your hands before it actually leaves the ground.

Deadlift Step 5

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5. Pull the bar up along your legs to the top

You are ready to pull. You already have the weight in your hands, and your entire body is in position.

Without compromising your back position, pull straight up and press your feet through the floor.

These two directly opposing actions will cause the weight to move with ease.

Remember, you are fighting gravity here. Any movement that is not directly vertical is stealing energy that you could be using to fight gravity with.

The best way to overcome gravity is to stay balanced over your mid-foot, where the bar starts the movement, and keep the bar in contact with your legs during the entire execution of the movement.

[instagram https://www.instagram.com/p/BjM4H6snBSe/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link expand=1]Michael Gregory on Instagram: “New Deadlift 1 Rep Max! . I learned not to let failure cloud my vision today. I failed, couldn’t move the weight on my first attempt at…”

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When to deadlift

The hamstrings are prone to extreme soreness, and for this reason, many trainees only deadlift once a week. But just one deadlift session a week is plenty to spur an increase in posterior chain size and strength.

Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift
MIGHTY FIT

‘Therapy on ice’ helps vets heal, give back to community

The buzz of the crowd had Sgt. 1st Class Michael Vaccaro on edge. Then a loud bang made him look around nervously.

He knew the noise came from a Zamboni machine, yet its exhaust made him think of the aftermath of a roadside bomb.

All his stress melted away immediately, however, as soon as he stepped out onto the ice.

“When I’m on the ice, no matter what happened before, everything dissipates,” he said. “It’s like a fresh start.”


Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift

Former Army Spc. Matt Holben, Capital Beltway Warriors assistant team captain and defensive player, hits the puck up ice during a holiday exhibition game with a Congressional Hockey Challenge team at MedStar Capitals Iceplex, Dec. 16, 2018.

(Photo by EJ Hersom)

Vaccaro is one of the co-founders of the Capital Beltway Warriors, a hockey team of veterans with disabilities founded two years ago.

Veterans on the team open up to each other and talk about how they cope with injuries, stress and other issues, said retired Maj. David Dixon, another co-founder of the team.

“It’s like a giant support group,” he said, “or therapy on ice, as we like to call it.”

Many of the players have some level of post-traumatic stress disorder from service in Iraq, Afghanistan or other hot spots, Dixon said. He personally survived four deployments to Iraq, where he was shot in the back and shaken up by three different improvised explosive devices.

Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift

Retired Maj. David Dixon, president and executive director of the Capital Beltway Warriors, makes game notes while coaching players between periods during a holiday exhibition game with a Congressional hockey challenge team at MedStar Capitals Iceplex, Dec. 16, 2018.

(Photo by EJ Hersom)

Giving back

Dixon and a number of the other veterans also coach youth hockey teams and a few of them help with a local blind hockey team, the Washington Wheelers.

“Giving back to the community often gives them a sense of purpose,” Dixon said of the veterans, adding that it helps minimize depression and PTSD.

Dixon puts in more than 20 volunteer hours a week managing the Capital Beltway Warriors as president and executive director of the team. He helps solicit sponsors, run meetings, apply for grants, recruit players and schedule games.

His time on the ice as a player-coach is extra.

Warrior Hockey

www.youtube.com

“In a sick kind of way, I enjoy all the hard work,” he said. “You go from commanding troops to working in a cubicle,” he said about retiring from the Army and beginning a civilian job.

He explained that managing the hockey team gives him a renewed sense of purpose.

“You find that niche in life that gives you purpose and whether it has a monetary award or not, that’s what you’re supposed to do,” he said.

He helps make the games special for the warriors with lights, music, an announcer and filling the stands with veterans. Local chapters of the Veterans of Foreign Wars and American Legion in northern Virginia help bring veterans from retirement homes to the games, Dixon said.

Vaccaro also spends several hours per week helping the Capital Beltway Warriors and other veteran hockey teams. He spends a week every year helping run the USA Hockey camp in Buffalo, New York, where they select the national sled hockey team.

He serves as a referee for blind hockey and sled hockey. He helps stand up other Warrior division hockey teams. In November, he spent a few days in Philadelphia helping the Flyers start a warrior team.

“This is my therapy,” he said of the volunteer work. “This is what keeps me going.”

Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift

Former Air Force Tech. Sgt. Joey Martell, Capital Beltway Warriors team captain, takes a shot during a holiday exhibition game with a Congressional hockey challenge team at MedStar Capitals Iceplex, Dec. 16, 2018.

(Photo by EJ Hersom)

Spreading the word

Just over two years ago, Vaccaro met up with Dixon who was interested in starting a Warrior hockey team in Virginia.

They met in the Pentagon food court in December 2016. “We sat down and started sketching stuff out on napkins,” Dixon said.

They laid out plans for a team that would play in rinks across Northern Virginia and Southern Maryland.

They found players by word of mouth. They showed up at “stick and shoot” sessions and asked if anyone was a military veteran with a disability rating.

Now they have 76 veterans with disabilities on the team and they play other warrior clubs. A game in Ashburn Dec. 22, 2018, pitted the USA Warriors from Maryland against the Capital Beltway Warriors. The teams also play in annual tournaments.

There are now 16 warrior teams across the United States. The minimum requirement to play on one of the teams is a 10 percent VA disability. Some of the players are 100 percent disabled and play with prosthetics.

Some of the veterans, like Vaccaro, have been playing hockey since they were 3 years old. Dixon, however, did not pick up the sport until he was 40.

Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift

Army Reserve Sgt. 1st Class Michael Vaccaro serves as referee for the charity exhibition game between the Capital Beltway Warriors and a Congressional hockey challenge team at MedStar Capitals Iceplex, Dec. 16, 2018.

(Photo by EJ Hersom)

Ramadi RPG

In 2006 and 2007, Vaccaro was an advisor to an Iraqi Army unit in Ramadi. He and two Marines were on patrol when they were pinned down by machine-gun fire. Then an insurgent fired a rocket-propelled grenade.

“It hit the wall in front of me and knocked me back. Next thing I remember, I heard this really loud ringing in my ears and there was a Marine dragging me back into the courtyard. They were calling for air support.

“We finished the patrol,” Vaccaro said, explaining aerial medical evacuation was not available. A doctor patched him up, and a couple of days later, he was back out on patrol.

After his tour in Iraq, he came back to Virginia, where he had been a reservist with the 80th Training Division. But he had PTSD issues. He decided to go to Liberia in western Africa as a contractor to help put about 2,000 Liberian soldiers through basic training.

“I thought that would help, but I just ended up coming back with the same issues,” he said. “That’s another thing: You can’t hide from this.

“Everybody handles PTSD in a different way. I tried the group therapy stuff and it just didn’t work.”

He received treatment and medication from Veterans Affairs, but the issues persisted. When he smelled fresh bread, for instance, it reminded him of the flatbread Iraqi soldiers baked every morning.

“That’s a good smell,” he said. But then his mind would continue to remember until he imagined the smell of an IED.

“You’ve got to face your fears. You’ve got to face your issues,” he said. “I was trying to hide from it and hockey has helped me open up and talk about it.”

About 10 years ago, he became involved in the first-of-its-kind USA Warrior hockey team stood up by a patient at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Maryland.

“When I’m on the ice, things slow down; things are different,” Vaccaro said.

Both he and his family noticed the difference in him after playing hockey.

“It really helped me,” he said. “The first thing I said to myself when I started realizing that is, ‘I’ve got to get other veterans involved in this.'”

So he became the national representative for USA Hockey in its Warrior division to help stand up teams. He does that in his spare time when he is not working as a civilian employee for the Army Corps of Engineers or on duty as an Army Reserve NCO.

Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift

David Dixon, coach of the Capital Beltway Warriors, provides tactical advice to players between periods during a holiday exhibition game with a Congressional hockey challenge team at MedStar Capitals Iceplex, Dec. 16, 2018.

(Gary Sheftick, Army News Service)

Natural coach

Dixon was coaching little league baseball when he was approached by his son’s hockey coach, Bobby Hill.

“He said he really liked the way I worked with the kids and he could use my help on the ice coaching,” Dixon recalled.

Dixon told him he did not skate, but Hill said he could take care of that. He got Dixon out on the ice and taught him the basics of hockey.

Dixon went to adult learn-to-play sessions Wednesday evenings at Ashburn Ice House. He participated in adult pick-up games after helping coach his son’s youth team.

He eventually took over as head coach of the Ashburn “Honey Badgers” peewee hockey team.

In the meantime, however, he heard of the USA Warriors hockey team and the effects it was having on disabled veterans in Maryland. He thought it would be great to bring the same benefits to veterans in northern Virginia.

Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift

Matt Holben (No. 19) of the Capital Beltway Warriors, and Joey Martell (No. 21) take the puck down ice with three members of a Congressional hockey challenge team not far behind, during an exhibition game Dec. 16, 2018 at MedStar Capitals Iceplex.

(Gary Sheftick, Army News Service)

Three pillars

The warrior hockey program aims to provide purpose, education and camaraderie that veterans miss after they separate from the service, Dixon said.

The team creates an environment that in some ways simulates being back around a military unit, said Matt Holben, alternate team captain for the Capital Beltway Warriors.

“It feels good, because you’re back with the guys, you’re back with the unit,” he said.

“We’ve got members with both physical and mental disability,” he added. “It’s hard for them to share their story, but when you talk to them, it’s just that little bit of relief they get when they’re in the locker room and on the team.”

“We’re helping each other,” Vaccaro said. “And half of the guys don’t even realize we’re helping each other, but that’s what we’re doing.”

The help is not limited to the rink either, Dixon said.

There is another part to the program that informs veterans of benefits available to them and helps with issues.

Anything from service dogs to getting help building a house, to loans, and more is available, Dixon said.

“We don’t do it all ourselves. We reach out to other veteran service organizations to get the help and education these guys need,” he said. “We have a whole network of VSOs that we can tap into.”

Vaccaro summed it up: “It’s veterans helping veterans.”

This article originally appeared on the United States Army. Follow @USArmy on Twitter.

MIGHTY FIT

Hump Day: Games I would play in my head while hiking

Humping is a reality for many of us, and I’m not talking about the kind that has a happy ending. In my Marine Corps career, I estimate that I easily hiked 1,000 miles with a full pack — between 50 and 150 lbs. At a minimum speed of 3 miles an hour, that’s over 300 hours of time for the mind to go to dark or funny places.


Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift

Maybe slip on some ice…

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Will Perkins)

Going internal

On a long hump, the mind so often goes dark. I remember envisioning the sweet relief of rolling an ankle so I could ride in the safety vehicle, even picking out the exact rock I was planning to eat shit on.

“That one….seriously, that one. Okay, fine, the next one… Ah, fine, I don’t wanna cause any serious damage. I’ll just take a header into that ditch and cause a concussion instead.”

On my 23rd birthday, I was on an 8-mile movement to a range for a live fire event. It was the second day in a row we were humping, and the entire epidermis of my right foot was already falling off, from the ball of my foot to the start of my heel, from the previous day’s movements. I had spent the previous weekend in Virginia beach drinking homemade Sangria, and the effects were still very much present.

I spent that entire hump in my own head questioning all of my life decisions.

Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift

You know he’s thinking about the next ‘Avengers’ movie.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Careaf L. Henson)

Making it fun

Eventually, I got to the point in my career where I just accepted that I would be walking for the next 8 hours and decided to make it fun. Games I played:

  • Reliving every fight I’ve ever been in and how I would Jason Bourne my way to victory if it happened again.
  • During daylight hikes I would make up fake hand and arm signals and try to confuse people who took things too seriously.
  • I would secretly listen to music on my iPod (I’m old) through a strategically placed earbud. #combathunter
  • My roommate would use hikes as an opportunity to eat as much as he could; it was one of the few times you had enough “free time” to eat a full meal. The trick would be to figure out a way to use the heater packet while hiking. You need to jam it between your pack and back and focus on walking level, so it doesn’t fall out. Beware of the high potential for second-degree burns.
Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift

“Hey! What was the name of the fat guy in The Office?”…

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Jessika Braden)

  • At one point, I wrote a new phonetic alphabet with just profanities. You can imagine what replaced Foxtrot. It was enlightening.
  • “A cougar is following you.” That’s just a game where you pretend a cougar is going to rip out your jugular as soon as you stop. The trick to this one is to think one step ahead of the mountain cat.
  • I would replace famous movie characters with my mom and see how the story would play out. It was never as entertaining, but always much more satisfying. If my mom took the place of Frodo in Lord of The Rings the opening scene would have also been the closing scene.
    • Gandalf shows up at night after dinner. Mom says, “What are you doing here? I’m busy, get out.” He counters “Lisa, you need to take the ring to Mordor to destr–” And, in classic Lisa fashion, she cuts him off mid-sentence with “That’s not my problem, now is it? Take it yourself.”
    • Roll credits.
Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift

Humping is a profession nearly as old as prostitution…

(Photo from the Thayer Soule Collection (COLL/2266) at the Archives Branch, Marine Corps History Division)

The right answer

Once I matured, I realized the right answer is to become externally motivated. I believe the jobs of the Platoon Commander and Platoon Sergeant are easier than the rifleman, because you are concerned with your Marines, rather than yourself. When your focus is pointed outward, time flies.

This lesson applies to every kind of difficult situation. Caring for others is one of the most selfish and least selfish things you can do. When it comes to hiking, if you focus externally, you get to push your own ailments aside until you are alone in your room, crying like a big dumb baby.

Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift

Keep moving forward…

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Aaron S. Patterson/Released)

In the gym, you are forced to confront your demons directly; there are no troops for you to look out for.

But in actuality, everything you do to make yourself better is also making the lives of those around you better. So, in a way, finishing a workout for your spouse or kids is no different than completing a movement for your unit.

Where are you in your hump day progression? Are you living in a world of regret and grief? Are you writing the next great American novel in your head? Or have you reached the point of hiking enlightenment and started checking on your guys and planning for their success when you reach your objective?

Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift
MIGHTY FIT

The correct way to train while injured

If you are asking any variation of “should I keep training even with (XYZ) injury or condition?” The answer is yes.

Then nuance ensues. You can’t necessarily keep training how you were before, and you definitely shouldn’t be training at the same intensity that you were before. At least not initially.


Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift

Just keep movin’

You need to dial it back, not off

You can still bench if you injure your ankle.

You can still squat if you hurt your elbow or shoulder.

That’s obvious. The body part that is injured will require some adjustment but the rest of your body is probably fine.

But if you injure your ankle or any part of your lower body you can still squat too; you just need to dial it back to what you can do with no pain.

I go in-depth on how to recover from an acute injury here.

One of my favorite sayings around this topic comes from Dr. Jordan Feigenbaum over at Barbell Medicine; it goes like this:

“…What are you gonna do? Not train?”

Not training isn’t an option. You should just remove it from your list of possibilities right now.

As a military professional, you need to find another way…

Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift

Do things properly and you’ll never have an issue.

You need to target the issue

Target the root cause, not the injury.

The incident/exercise that you’ve targeted as the cause of your injury or pain IS NOT the cause of your injury or pain. It is merely the culminating event. Your chronically bad form or overly aggressive programming is the cause. Honestly, it’s most likely a combination of the two.

The most common example I see often is people doing deadlifts for time, (WOD anyone?) with sh!tty form where they:

  1. Bounce the weight and “catch” it with their low back in flexion
  2. Hyperextend their low back at lock out at the top of the rep
  3. Have a fundamental lack of understanding as to why these are bad things.
  4. These are things you will never have to worry about if you’re doing the Mighty Fit Plan

This type of action with heavy weight repeatedly is a recipe for an acute injury, as well as chronic stress. The athlete deadlifting in this fashion often comes to the conclusion that deadlifts are bad and cause injuries.

That’s a false narrative.

What they were doing is bad and causes injuries, not deadlifts.

More times than not, I see that poor form translate into the lifting of all things, including luggage, small children, a case of beer, and dropped pencils.

Don’t let a training injury translate into you joining the sedentary epidemic.

Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift

Treat the root cause

Targeting the issue doesn’t mean you stop training

Demonizing a movement or activity like deadlifts is a red herring. Taking them out of your life will do nothing for all of those other times you have to pick something up in your life as I mentioned above.

Pain from deadlifting is just a symptom.

The root cause is poor form.

This is a good thing. This means you can do anything and need not fear any one particular movement or activity.

It also means you never have to stop training. You just need to dial things back.

Root causes are what really makes us tick or not tick.

Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift

There’s always a way to simplify if you can control your ego.

An example: How to dial back deadlifts

You should regress your exercise until you get to the point of no pain. That implies that you start by dialing back range of motion, weight, and intensity.

Here’s how I would do that for a theoretical low back issue as I mentioned above:

  1. Stop doing deadlifts for time. Events for time are for people that have perfect muscle memory of a movement, your injury has proved that you aren’t at that point.
  2. Reduce the range of motion. If it hurts at the top of the movement, don’t do that part. Hurts at the bottom? Do a rack pull.
  3. Drop weight. If you can do the full exercise at a lighter weight, do that. Use a weight in which you are at less than a four on the pain scale of 1-10.
  4. For a full run down on ALL the possible deadlift form fixes to correct low back pain check out this bad boy.

Something you need to mentally accept here is that you’re not “gonna be gettin’ it” like you were before the injury. BUT, you’ll still be training.

Again, for a more in depth conversation on this topic, check this out.
Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift

Rebuild one part at a time… that’s good advice.

The process of champions

This is the smart process. It will get you back in the saddle quickly and smartly. Three to six weeks of reducing your training on exercises that cause pain will ensure that you properly rehab your injury AND ensure that you continue the habit of training.

It will prevent you from sitting on the couch and waiting for yourself to “heal.” It’ll prevent you from writing off entire exercises or workout modalities for the rest of your life.

Knees hurt? Check out this article on how to get them back to 100%.

It’ll flex your patience muscle. Being patient with your body is not easy, especially when you used to be able to do something. Patience is a great thing to hone so that when you get old and frail, you don’t become one of those curmudgeons who hate the world for how it wronged you. (Damn, that got deep.)

It’s all connected people. Use your training as a testing ground for the positive character traits you value and want to exhibit in your everyday life.

Heal smart and keep training!

If you want to train smart so that you never have to worry about this recovery process, check out my video course for how to set up your training to workout smarter and more effectively here.
Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift
MIGHTY CULTURE

Why the Marines want you to quit tobacco

The first step in quitting tobacco is thinking about it. If you think about quitting tobacco someday, whether it’s tomorrow or in five years, then you can develop the intention of changing your behavior.

The Great American Smoke Out is an event started by the American Cancer Society to help motivate people to quit tobacco. The event, which challenges you to quit tobacco for a day, is held on the third Thursday each November. This year, the Great American Smoke Out took place on 21 November.

Can you quit tobacco for a day? By quitting even temporarily, you are taking an important step toward living a healthier life. You will start to feel the health benefits of being tobacco-free within the first twenty minutes of quitting.


This article originally appeared on Marines.mil. Follow @USMC on Twitter.

Articles

Here’s how the US Army’s fitness standards have changed with the times

Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift
U.S. Army Leaders with 2nd Cavalry Regiment run in the front of a Regimental formation during a morale run March 28, 2013 at Rose Barracks, Germany. Troops with the Regiment ran three miles during morning physical fitness as a morale booster. | U.S. Army Photo by Spc. Joshua Edwards


There’s almost no way getting around it — if you’re serving in the US military, maintaining one’s physical fitness is a duty that you have to fulfill, unless you’d prefer to struggle to catch your breath.

In order to accommodate both the fluctuation of the average person’s physical traits and the demands of modern warfare, the US Army’s Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) is constantly honing its physical fitness standards. Taking a look at this evolution of physical standards with Whitfield B. East’s, “A Historical Review and Analysis of Army Physical Readiness Training and Assessment” provides not only the insight to the demands of what was needed on the battlefield back then, but also answers the highly debated question of whether servicemembers back in the day could be considered fitter.

Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift
West Point cadets in 1870 (where are their PT belts?) | Public Domain

Starting in the early 1800s, United States Military Academy (USMA) cadets neglected physical exercise and merely practiced military drills — even recreational activities were frowned upon. After realizing their mistakes, Congress and Army leaders sent officials to Europe to determine the best course for implementing a physical education program for their future officers.

Tasks within this new program included scaling a 15-foot wall without using tools, vaulting on a horse 15-hands high, leaping a ditch 10-feet wide, an 8-minute mile run, and a 3-mile march carrying a 20-pound knapsack in one hour. Also recommended in this new program was the ability to dive and remain underwater for 45-seconds.

Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift
USMA Physical Education under Herman Kohler Combat Studies Institute Press via Public Domain

Shortly after the Civil War, the USMA appointed its first pedagogically-trained instructor, Herman Koehler, as its “Master of the Sword.” As the new head of West Point’s Department of Physical Education, Koehler focused on gymnastics as a key element for fitness and brought into existence the first Army-wide training manuals for physical training in 1887.

In 1906, the Army then implemented its first unit-wide physical training program. Tasks included a weekly 12-mile march for the infantry and 18-miles for horse-mounted artillery and cavalry units. Even the President at the time, Theodore Roosevelt, was obsessed about starting a physical regimen for the military — as a sickly kid during his childhood, he developed a philosophy of strenuous exercise.

Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift
United States Defense Visual Information Center via Wikimedia Commons

World War I then brought new fitness requirements for the Army — the first manual to identify quantifiable physical objectives was developed. This Individual Efficiency Test measured combat physical readiness with the following requirements: running 100 yards in 14 seconds, a 12-foot broad running jump, an unassisted 8-foot wall climb, throwing a hand grenade for 30 yards into a 10′ diameter circle, and an obstacle course run.

Shortly before the attack on Pearl Harbor and the US’ involvement in World War II, the US was seen as a complacent country that neglected physical activity due to the 20 years of peace and continued innovations to make life easier — over a third of the military’s inductees were considered to be in “miserable shape”, and half of them weren’t even able to swim well.

This proved to be a harrowing precursor to the landing of D-Day, when it was determined that a significant number of deaths were attributed to the fact that many servicemembers had drowned in waters that were 10-15 feet deep.

Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift
Troops in an LCVP landing craft approach Omaha Beach on D-Day, June 6, 1944.Photo: Wiki Commons

To address these inadequacies, in 1944, the Physical Efficiency Test Battery was created. This battery of tests included pull-ups, 20 seconds of burpees, squat jumps, push-ups, a 100-yard pig-a-back run, sit-ups, and a 300-yard shuttle run. Normative scales were included during this examination to provide participants with the added incentive to score higher and to incite a “competitive spirit” amongst themselves.

Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift
Flickr / DVIDSHUB

Finally, in the 1980s, testing requirements shaped into what it currently resembles within the Army. The gender-integrated Army Physical Readiness Test (APRT) evaluated soldiers on their ability to do push-ups, sit-ups, and a 2-mile run in that order, with 10-20 minutes of rest time between each event.

After receiving initial data on the results, research teams concluded that about 5% of soldiers should be able to score the maximum points allotted for the test. During the beginning of this era, there were no scoring standards for soldiers over the age of 40, and those that were only authorized to be tested on the 2-mile run.

Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift
Marine Corps recruits perform ammunition can lifts during the Combat Fitness Test. | Public Domain

Since then, there has been much debate with the current scoring system in the Army’s physical fitness test — many scorn the “corporate fitness” model and it’s detraction from its more combat-oriented roots. It remains to be seen if the Army implements a more functional assessment to meet the demands of today, such as the Marine Corps’ Combat Fitness Test.

Whichever way the Army decides to keep rolling along, you can be sure that servicemembers will be profusely sweating.

MIGHTY FIT

3 hiking tips you hadn’t thought of from a U.S. Marine

One of the most arduous parts of Marine Corps life and training has to be the long-distance rucks. Covering a lot of miles with a lot of weight on your back may seem like a simple enough proposition, but as time goes by, you start to pick up on a few things that can make an otherwise grueling hike just a bit more pleasant–or at least, a bit less likely to cause you the sort of nuisance injuries that can really make a week in the field feel more like a week in hell.

While the nuts and bolts of a long distance hike are simple enough (bring adequate food, water, and appropriate emergency gear, then just put one foot in front of the other until you’re finished) there are some things you can do before you set out or carry with you on the hike that will pay dividends throughout the hump and after, as your body recovers.


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It doesn’t matter if it’s made for a man or a woman, all that matters is that it works.

(Courtesy of the author)

Use dry deodorant to manage chafing

Despite how much I’ve worked out throughout my adult life, I somehow never quite managed to get one of those “thigh gaps” all the girls on Instagram keep talking about, and as such, chafing in my groin and between my thighs has always been a concern on long-distance hikes. The combination of sweat, the seams of my pants, and my rubbing thunder thighs always conspire to leave my undercarriage raw, which quickly becomes a constant source of pain as I log the miles.

Even with spandex undergarments and an industrial supply of baby powder, chafing can rear its head and ruin your day, but you can relieve a lot of that heartache (or, I suppose, crotch-ache) by rubbing your dry stick deodorant all over the affected area. The deodorant creates a water-resistant barrier that protects the raw skin as you keep on trucking. This trick has worked for me in the savannas of Africa, the busy streets of Rome, and even in the relentlessly humid Georgia woods. Remember–it’s got to be dry stick deodorant. Gel stuff just won’t do the trick.

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Also comes in handy if any of your buddies passes out early at a party.

(Courtesy of the author)

Carry a sharpie to keep tabs on bites

Spider and other insect bites can be a real cause for concern on the trail, and not necessarily for the reasons you think. It’s not all that likely that you’ll get bitten by a spider with the sort of venomous punch to really make you ill, but even an otherwise innocuous spider or insect bite can turn into big problems in a field environment. Bites create a high risk for infection, and not everyone responds to exposure to venoms, bacteria, or stingers in the same way. That’s why it’s imperative that you keep an eye on any questionable bites you accumulate along your hike.

Use a sharpie to draw a circle around the outside perimeter of a bite when you notice it, then note the time and day. As you go about your hike, check on the bite sporadically to see if the swollen, red area is expanding beyond the original perimeter. Add circles with times as you check if the bite continues to grow. If the bite grows quickly beyond that first drawn perimeter, is bright or dark red, and feels warm and firm to the touch, seek medical care for what may be a nasty infection. If you experience any trouble breathing, that’s a strong sign that you may be going into anaphylactic shock due to an allergy, and you need immediate medical care.

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One of the best feelings in the world, followed by one of the worst feelings (putting your boots back on)

(Marine Corps Photo By: Cpl. Matthew Brown)

Add moleskin to blister prone spots on your feet before blisters form

If you’ve done any hiking, you’re already familiar with moleskin as a go-to blister treatment, but most people don’t realize how handy moleskin can be for blister prevention as well.

If you know that you tend to get blisters on certain spots on your feet during long hikes (the back of the heel and the inside of the ball of the foot are two common hot spots, for instance) don’t wait for a blister to form to use your moleskin. Instead, cut off a piece and apply it to the trouble spots on your feet ahead of time, adding a protective buffer between the friction points of your boot and your feet themselves.

It helps to replace the moleskin about as often as you replace your socks, to prevent it from peeling off and bunching up on you (causing a different hiking annoyance), but when done properly, you can escape even the longest hikes pretty blister free.

MIGHTY FIT

Setting expectations: what your home workout can and cannot do for you

If you typically workout at a gym, the mandatory closing of most establishments around the world has seriously changed your fitness routine. As a result, there’s a good chance you’ve at least thought about working out at home.

But before you continue your standard training plan, you have to be realistic about what you can achieve. Unless you have equipment that matches the options of your gym, there will be some compromise.


Understanding the limitations of your bodyweight or minimal-equipment workout plan is crucial. At least, if you hope to progress and maintain during this age of quarantine.

With this understanding, you can set realistic goals and train in ways that will help you achieve them.

Here are some factors to remember as you jump into the world of training at home with no equipment.

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Impossible doesn’t mean impossible… think about it. What’s impossible for most may not apply to you.

U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Esgar Rojas

Muscle Building Expectations

If you have no equipment at home, the harsh reality is that building muscle with only your bodyweight will be challenging. Unfortunately, it’s even worse if you’re experienced with lifting weights.

Building muscle depends on progressive overload. In a nutshell, the body responds to resistance training by getting bigger and stronger, depending on how hard you train. But once your body responds, you have to throw more at it if you want to continue improving.

If you have experience with weight training, your muscles have grown to deal with these increased demands of weight, reps, and sets.

Now, you have only your bodyweight as resistance, which is a much lower stimulus than you usually achieve at the gym.

For instance, imagine the number of bodyweight squats you’d have to perform to match the stress and intensity of a 10-rep squat set with 315 pounds. And that’s just one set!

Importantly, if you have five or more years of consistent training under your belt, things will be challenging. Realistically, building additional size with only your body will be very difficult.

For you, you’ll need to train harder than you ever imagined if you have no resistance and want to build additional muscle.

If you have almost no experience with lifting weights, (which is unlikely) and want to begin working out, muscle growth will still be challenging, but possible. At least, as long as you make sure to practice progressive overload by adding exercises, sets, and reps.

If you’re lucky enough to have some equipment, like dumbbells, kettlebells, and a pull-up bar, building or maintaining muscle will be easier. However, don’t expect the same results as you would with a full gym at your disposal.

Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift

Strength with a capital “S” is that which must me trained at your limit. It’s hard to find your limit at home unless you decide to lift your car.

U.S. Army photo by Spc. Ryan Lucas

Strength Building Expectations

If you’re experienced and strong, building and maintaining strength with only your bodyweight will be even more challenging than building muscle size.

Strength and muscle size are connected. However, strength depends more on how your nervous system reacts to heavy resistance. Without that resistance, strength gain is challenging.

Have you ever seen someone with incredible strength, despite being small? That’s because muscle size isn’t the only factor for strength.

Think of it this way: your muscle tissue is your hardware, and your strength ability is your software. Bigger muscles have the capacity to produce more strength, but you have to train correctly to use that potential.

Essentially, the physical act of trying to move heavy resistance is what teaches your body to get stronger. Without that heavy resistance, there’s nothing to tell your body to maintain or build strength.

Fortunately, performing explosive movements like high and long jumps will help your muscles maintain the ability to produce force rapidly. But, understand that explosive bodyweight jumps will never match the stimulus of a heavy and explosive squat or deadlift.

Here’s the takeaway: if you want to maintain your strength without equipment, try to incorporate explosive movements. These include things like:

  • Sprinting
  • High and long jumps
  • Contracting your muscles as forcefully as possible during exercises. (Including an explosive set or two in some of your workouts can do the trick here.)
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M240B is 27.5 lbs that’s a nice bit of extra resistance that would be frowned upon at your local Planet Fitness. Make the most with what you have.

U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Esgar Rojas

Aerobic and Anaerobic Capacity

Luckily, it’s not all bad news.

If your cardio is lacking, you have an awesome opportunity to improve. That’s because aerobic and anaerobic capacities don’t rely on resistance.

Mostly, you can challenge and improve your cardio with little or no equipment, by just going for a run.

As another example, try performing 100 bodyweight squats with as little rest as possible. Then the next time, try 150. Challenges like this will stress both your aerobic and anaerobic systems and help you maintain and improve.

Best of all, even though your cardio still depends on progressive overload, you can practice this overload easily with no resistance. For example:

  • You can run longer
  • You can run faster and longer
  • You can take shorter rest periods between exercises
  • You can add more exercises
  • You can sprint uphill or downhill
  • You can add more squats per set

This list goes on.

The takeaway here is that building and maintaining muscle and strength with only your bodyweight will be challenging. Your cardio, however, doesn’t rely on external resistance. This factor makes cardio improvement a bit easier to achieve, especially if you have no equipment available.

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Hold yourself accountable to training 6 times a week for two months then worry about results. You can only control your actions not the outcomes of them.

U.S. Marine Corps photo by Pfc. Timothy Shoemaker

Bubble burst?

Maybe, maybe not, maybe go fix yourself.

The fact of the matter is 90% of you fine readers should have just shrugged by the end of this article after realizing not much is changing since you don’t work out consistently or intensely enough. The other 10% are probably weight and power lifters. Chances are you lifting cults…errr, clubs never closed anyway.

Now, if your goal is to put on muscle while training at home you can still do it. Just get creative by finding “weights” around the house or check out one of the countless calisthenics strength training YouTube channels. With the internet at your fingertips you have no choice to feign ignorance. Start with AthleanX or my bodyweight program Back in Fighting Shape here if you’re absolutely experiencing paralysis by analysis.
MIGHTY FIT

The one weightlifting exercise everyone might be overdoing

If you’re even remotely into the world of exercise and fitness, chances are you’ve noticed more people, particularly women, catching on to the various benefits of weight training over the past few years.

However, according to Dan Roberts, a personal trainer to models and movie stars, while there are countless benefits of weightlifting, there’s far too much emphasis on it within the world of fitness — particularly for women.

Business Insider caught up with Roberts at the Be:Fit London fitness festival, where Roberts gave a talk on mental health in the industry.


Originally a sports coach, Roberts has been a strength and conditioning trainer in New York, Australia, and London, working with elite and pro athletes and sports teams.

His accomplishments involve training India’s national tennis team, Britain’s junior ski team, and “a lot of pro wrestlers and pro fighters,” he told Business Insider.

About 10 years ago, he moved to Rio and became the in-house trainer for a big modeling agency, working with Victoria’s Secret models, before moving to Thailand to become a pro fighter for a year.

Eventually, his experiences led him to London, where he set up the Dan Roberts Group, which operates a number of companies offering personal training, online workouts, nutrition, branded fitness products, and fitness retreats, with a “small growing team” in New York.

While he says he trains “the biggest A-listers you can think of,” whether it’s an athlete, a model, or an actor preparing for a role, the company keeps things low-profile. “The reason I get clients like that is because I don’t tweet about it, [it’s not] on my Instagram.”

Through his company, Roberts tries to inspire better body image, as he believes there’s too much focus on looks in the industry.

“The main thing is exercise can be really good for mental health, but if you do it mindlessly trying to look hot, that’s not good for mental health,” he said. “Your approach towards exercise, the relationship you have with your body and food, and the relationship you have with exercise are all really important, so we try and help people with that.”

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The obsession with squats

Roberts believes the one exercise the fitness world it too obsessed with is the squat.

“We tend to live quite quad-dominant lives, which means we sit down all day, and we sit up, we tend to lean forward, because when we sit down our hip flexors tighten, and our glutes switch out. Certain things tighten and these end up working more.”

He added: “If these are working more and your hamstrings are weak and your glutes aren’t working, to me it doesn’t make sense to do exercises which do exactly the same.

He said that holding a heavy weight and “going up and down a bunch of times” is “not very functional.”

“To me we don’t need to be that strong and it’s emphasising the muscles which, for most of us who sit down in the Western world, have overdeveloped.”

He also added that he works with a lot of women who want a firm bum and toned legs, but not big thighs — and the weighted squat is the opposite of what they’re after.

Instead, he recommends his clients do posterior chain exercises, like a deadlift.

“You bend over and stand up — that is far better than a squat,” he said.

“I very rarely give a squat just because I want people to have balanced bodies. When you have a balanced body and less muscular imbalances, you have less injuries.”

Strength is just one part

As a strength coach, Roberts believes that if you’re only doing a short half-hour workout, “weight training is more bang for your buck, because you strengthen the bones, you increase metabolism, and also when you’ve got a stronger body it’s more bulletproof to injuries.”

However, while he pushes the benefits of weight training, he said that fitness obsessives do not focus enough on “multi-directional movements — playing, basically.”

“We’re way stronger than we need to be,” he said. “If you go to the gym now people are deadlifting 200 pounds — [but] the only time you ever need to do that is in a gym. We don’t need to be that strong. We need to have a balance of flexibility, endurance, coordination, strength — strength is just one part. There’s too much emphasis on strength.”

He added that there’s a myth within the industry that because women don’t have as much testosterone as men, they can’t bulk up.

“A lot of what personal trainers are taught is you must have the right hormones to build up and weights will never get you bulky,” he said. “It’s not true — weights can get you bulky.”

Treat your body like a unit

Planning leg day, chest day, or back day at the gym is a very “1950s, 1960s bodybuilding view,” according to Roberts.

“If you’re a bodybuilder with those goals, it is an effective way. You don’t have to do total body if you want to isolate.”

However, he said: “Most of us aren’t bodybuilders, so that approach doesn’t really make sense. For 99% of us, it makes sense to work the body as a unit, because we’re designed as a unit. That’s why sports is really good.

“Say you’re serving in tennis or playing netball, you’re using your upper body and lower body together, working two or three planes of motion, twisting and bending, [which is] way better than just (lifting up and down).

“Generally, I disagree what that targeted approach. But there are always exceptions. If I’ve got to tone someone for a film, and they have to have a big chest, I’m not going to pay tennis with them, I am going to do a bench press. Like all of these things, for the majority of people I disagree, but there’s always exceptions.”

Work with your environment — and body

Roberts’ own fitness routine changes all the time.

“I’ve got a competitive sporting background,” he told Business Insider. “I was a county level tennis player, I played lacrosse for England, I’ve done ultra-marathons, I’ve had fights professionally, so it depends what’s going on in my life. At the moment, I’m doing quite a lot of cardio stuff.”

He added that he recently worked with a client abroad, so they spent time kayaking and swimming every day.

“I’m not training for a particular event right now, so I usually let the situational environment dictate. If I’m in a gym I’ll do more weights, if I’m outside I’ll do more running, if I’m on a beach I’ll do more swimming.

“I’ve done so much training over the years that I like just playing.”

He added that along with your environment, your own personal needs should also dictate the type of workout you’re doing.

“If you want to look after your bones, swimming is terrible for you, but weights is great for you. If you want to improve flexibility, don’t do boxing, do yoga. It depends on what you want.”

This article originally appeared on Business Insider. Follow @BusinessInsider on Twitter.

MIGHTY FIT

Do your knees hurt when you squat?

If I’ve said it once, I’ve said it at least 10 times the back squat is the one exercise you should be doing to get stronger, bigger, faster, live longer, and look sexier. It’s that simple.

But sometimes our damn knees don’t seem to agree. Luckily there’s a lot you can do to make your knees a happy member of your lower body family.

First, let’s go over how to make some on the spot corrections and then talk about what you can do to make your knees strong and resilient.


Do your knees hurt when squatting?

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You’ve got lazy glutes and your knees are paying the price.

The valgus knee collapse, yes, you read that correctly. It’s that brutal-looking event that happens when your glute medius doesn’t know how to pull its weight.

If your knees are caving in when you squat, fix it by focusing on twisting your knees out and engaging the upper outside corner of your glutes AKA your glute medius. For some of you that simple correction will be enough to relieve your knees and clear up any pain.

Here’s another way to wake your glutes up as well.

Do your knees hurt when squatting?

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Give your glutes a reminder.

In between sets of squatting perform 12-15 reps of the glute bridge. Really focus on squeezing your glutes at the top of the movement and keeping your knees pointed out while bridging. This will cue your glutes to stay on when you get back to your sets of squatting.

Don’t forget about the hip thrust either!

Do your knees hurt when squatting?

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Give your hips a reminder.

It’s not always the glutes’ fault; sometimes the hip flexors are just as guilty. The majority of us spend all day sitting down with our psoas muscles and the rest of the hips flexors gang shortened and disengaged. It’s not totally their fault for not taking part in the squat.

By engaging your hip flexors, you’ll find it easier to sit back and down rather than crumbling forward into your knees like you may be doing currently.

Give your hip flexors some resistance between sets with your hands and force them to actively close your hip angle.

If that simple cue doesn’t work for you, use a resistance band to give you some errr…. resistance. Hang it up high and hold onto it with both hands. Then actively pull yourself down into the squat position by engaging your hip flexors.

Do your knees hurt when squatting?

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Maybe, you’ve got bad form.

Patterning issues aren’t uncommon in the squat. It’s a complicated exercise. That’s why if you haven’t yet committed it to memory you need to reread the 5 Steps to Back Squat Perfection.

Do your knees hurt when squatting?

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You aren’t sitting back.

Squat TO A box. Don’t box squat.

The box isn’t there to make your life easier. It’s there to help you make the squat as efficient and gainful as possible. Put that box behind you and stick your ass out and back to the box. Just touch it with your butt and stand back up. Don’t linger down there relaxing.

Here are some other squat variants to spice up your training.

Do your knees hurt when squatting?

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Your depth is not deep enough.

The funny thing about squat depth is it helps you actually engage the muscles you want to. If you’re only doing half or quarter squats your hamstrings are getting left out.

When your quads are completely dominating the squat, they are also putting a lot of anterior stress on the knee. The hamstrings job is to be engaged and supply an equally opposing force on the knee.

If you aren’t getting your hamstrings involved your quad is crushing your knee. It’s as simple as that.

Make sure you’re deadlifting enough to keep those hammies strong as well!

Do your knees hurt when squatting?

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You need more ankle mobility.

Simply stand with your heels on a 1-inch board. Boom! More ankle mobility and less forward knee travel in the squat.

Now that’s a life hack! Silicon Valley biohackers ain’t got nothin’ on my Back Squat Hacks!

Do your knees hurt when squatting?

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The stronger and happier knees prescription.

Foam roll your thighs. Hit them from every angle after you finish squatting or on your off days.

Take 3-5 minutes per leg. Any more than that is just masturbation.

If you’re interested, here’s a deep dive on recovery.

Do your knees hurt when squatting?

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Lying Side Clams

Get your Fit-Chick-Gym-Shark pants on and practice opening and closing your legs. Seriously, don’t wear short shorts when doing these.

Do 2-3 sets of 10-12 reps at the end of your leg workout.

Add them to the end of The Mighty Fit Plan as well!

Do your knees hurt when squatting?

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Hip Thrust

Thrust it out!

These will wake the sleeping giant that is your ass. After 4 weeks of hip thrusts you’ll find yourself walking different in a more efficient and stable kind of way.

Hip thrust once a week, program in the same reps and sets scheme as your deadlift and back squat. Consider them your 3rd major lower body movement.

Do your knees hurt when squatting?

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Hit your Core

Hit your obliques and rectus abdominis. Chops and ab wheel roll-out will do the trick here. Throw them at the end of any workout and go for 2-3 sets of 8-12 reps. They will make your core so stable that your knees won’t ever feel the secondary effects of a weak spine ever again.

Unlike these, the above core exercises actually do something!

Do your knees hurt when squatting?

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Consider your Squat frequency

Only squat once per week. Unless you love squatting or are competing you don’t need to do it more than 1 time a week. You have 3 major lower body movements; the squat, the deadlift, and the hip thrust. There’s no need to squat, especially if your knees bother you.

Even if the Back squat is King!

Do your knees hurt when squatting?

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Do your knees hurt when squatting?

That’s it yo! If you haven’t yet watched the video that I made to go along with this article, you’re missing out. That’s where the nitty-gritty details are.

If you diligently apply these fixes to your back squat, you will very quickly find that your knees are no longer bothersome.

By combining these fixes with the programming of the Mighty Fit Plan, you’ll be unstoppable.

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MIGHTY FIT

6 abdominal exercises to help tone your tummy

Heading out to the beach or chilling out by the pool are some of the best ways to spend a warm, summer day. Unfortunately, countless people feel insecure about getting into swimwear because they don’t like the way their body looks. But, by taking just 10 to 15 minutes out of your day, you can tone up that tummy with a few exercises and restore your confidence.

Do the following and get out there and soak up the sun’s rays



And, of course, don’t forget proper sun protection.

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Leg raises

Start by getting into a laying position. Now, place your hands under your lower back, extend your legs out, and hold them up, slightly bent. Begin the rep by raising your legs upward toward the sky and then slowly lowering them back down, but do not touch the ground with your feet. It’s a solid exercise for our lower abdominal muscles. Make sure you engage that core throughout.

Got it?

Now repeat this 10-15 times and do at least two or three more sets.

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Supermans

Lay flat on your tummy and — just like how Superman flies — hold your arms and legs straight out, lifting them slightly. This action creates controlled stress on your lower back, which you should hold for two to three seconds before releasing.

Got it? Sweet!

Now repeat this 10-15 times and do at least two more sets.

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Planks

Start by laying face-down on the ground. Now, hold yourself up by your elbows and toes — while wearing shoes, of course. Using a stopwatch, hold yourself in place for 30-60 seconds.

If you can hold yourself up for at least 30 seconds, do it for another 30 seconds and see how that feels. It’s all about progression.

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Bicycle crunches

This excellent exercise can be done anywhere that you have enough space to lay on your back. Once you’re in position, bring your knees, one at a time, toward your face, tightening your abdomen in the process. Then, simply pedal your feet as if you’re riding a bike.

It’s easy and your abs will thank you in a few weeks.

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Flutter kicks

Start in a laying position and place your hands under your glutes (buttocks) for stability and comfort. Then, squeeze your core and quickly raise and lower your straightened legs.

You want to get those feet up about 12-18 inches off the ground to really work your core.

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Russian twists

While in a modified sitting position with your feet flat on the floor, put a slight tilt in your back as you lean and bring your hands together as if holding an object.

Then, by merely twisting your core and bringing your hands close to your hips, you’ll engage your obliques. Remember to maintain proper control throughout the movement for best results.

MIGHTY FIT

Max your next PT test with this proven nutrition strategy

Contrary to popular belief, nutrition timing isn’t a huge deal. Your human body is smart, assuming you’re a human and not a robot or lizard alien wearing a human skin suit. Your body knows how to use the fuel you give it. It doesn’t rely on you feeding it the exactly correct proportion of nutrients at the exactly perfect time each day.

That being said, there are some things you can do to ensure that you crush your next PT test. Couple this advice with a comprehensive training plan like the Mighty Fit Plan with the Endurance Boost Plug-In, and you’re basically guaranteed a meritorious promotion.

Here’s exactly what you need to do…


[instagram https://www.instagram.com/p/BjZpCj2n3Kr/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link expand=1]Michael Gregory on Instagram: “Everyone wants to know how to eat to boost their athletic performance. Here’s the answer. . Eat the proper amounts of micronutrients and…”

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Step 1: Pre-test nutrition

Consume a normal high protein meal with a solid source of starch or carbs, some good fat, and plenty of micronutrient-containing veggies 2-3 hours before your workout.

Protein before a workout, even hours before a workout, can help maintain and increase muscle size, reduce and prevent chronic muscle damage, and put plenty of amino acids in your bloodstream when your body is most apt to use them.

Carbs before your workout will fuel your training by putting glucose readily in your bloodstream and by topping off your muscle and liver glycogen stores. In addition, carbs stimulate insulin, which is good if you are consuming protein. Insulin prevents muscle protein breakdown and promotes muscle protein synthesis to help your muscles grow.

Fats, although they don’t seem to directly impact performance, do slow down digestion. This means you will have more energy longer because your body is slowly burning the fuel from the rest of your meal.

Bottom line: No need for fancy sports gels or drinks here! Just eat smart.

Have a real whole food meal 2-3 hours before. You could also opt for an easier-to-digest shake with all the needed essentials.

CAFFEINE: The most effective and affordable pre-workout in existence is caffeine. Taken either as a cup of coffee or in a pill, have the equivalent of 200-400mg about an hour before your test, and your system will be primed. Don’t waste your money on any powders in the exchange that come in a plastic tub or energy drinks.

[instagram https://www.instagram.com/p/BjgHXn8HV-K/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link expand=1]Michael Gregory on Instagram: “90% of the time you can get by on drinking water during a workout. The other 10% it depends on what you are doing! . If you are a more…”

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Step 2: During the test nutrition

This portion is only if your PT test is going to take more than 90 minutes!

On average, a PT test lasts an hour with long breaks, You don’t need to eat during it. Consuming anything during a test should be reserved for long sessions like the USMC Combat Endurance Test or pretty much every day at BUD/S.

That being said, you want to focus on protein and fast carbs.

Protein during a workout prevents muscles from breaking down and aids in quicker recovery. For people grinding out multiple hour runs or multiple workouts a day, this is imperative.

Carbs keep your energy substrate elevated during a workout. Once you deplete your glycogen stores, you need to refuel them to stay at a high level of performance for anaerobic activity. This is key if performance is a high priority for you.

Fats aren’t really necessary during training. Plus, they could hit your stomach like a ton of bricks. Stick to protein and carbs. Ensure you are getting your fats in your other meals of the day, like in the meals provided in The Ultimate Composure Nutrition Guide.

You’ll notice a sports drink here. The ONLY time you need one of these sugar bombs is when you are training like a maniac. Otherwise, it’s just destroying your teeth and body.

[instagram https://www.instagram.com/p/Bji4iHnHkMn/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link expand=1]Michael Gregory on Instagram: “The anabolic window is dead. All hail the wide open anabolic garage door! . What do you need to eat after a workout in order to ensure your…”

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Step 3: Post-workout nutrition

In order to recover (speaking of recovery, here’s how you recover from an injury) so that you can hit it hard tomorrow focus on meals consisting of whole food.

A meal that looks pretty much just like your pre-workout meal is spot-on for post-workout nutrition, consumed within 2 hours after your workout.

Contrary to popular belief, you don’t have to throw a protein shake down your throat the minute you stop working out. Relax, go home, have a shower, cook a nice meal, and enjoy it.

You easily have up to 90 minutes, maybe even more, after a workout to get the nutrition your body requires.

Besides, the protein you ate before your workout is still peaking in your system. Having a full meal rather than a pure protein shake also helps slow down muscle protein synthesis, which is a good thing. It means your body will have more of a chance to get those amino acids from the protein to where they are needed most in your body.

Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift

Keep things simple and finish strong.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Joel Soriano)

Pretty simple, right?

The major assumption I’m making is that you don’t generally eat like an asshat in your everyday life. As a military professional, you should be fueling your body with high protein whole food meals. Like the kind you can get from the chow hall. Don’t hate, the highest quality nutrition on military bases is in the dining facility. It’s definitely not at Pizza Hut or Xtreme Frank’s Franks.

No carb loading necessary.

No magic amino drink needed.

Just real foods eaten regularly.

Send me any questions, comments, or concerns you have about your specific nutrition needs in regards to your training at michael@composurefitness.com. If you just want my FREE nutrition guide that covers everything you need to successfully cut, bulk, or maintain your current composition, grab it here!

Don’t forget to drop a comment in the comments section of this article’s FB post to let others know what to expect. There’s usually 73 dumb comments by people who didn’t actually read the article. Pipe up and let others know there’s high-quality info in here!

I’m also making a push to keep the conversation going over at the Mighty Fit Facebook Group. If you haven’t yet joined the group, do so. It’s where I spend the most time answering questions and helping people get the most out of their training.

Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift

Send me any questions, comments, or concerns you have about your specific nutrition needs in regards to your training at michael@composurefitness.com. If you just want my FREE nutrition guide that covers everything you need to successfully cut, bulk, or maintain your current composition, grab it here!

Don’t forget to drop a comment in the comments section of this article’s FB post to let others know what to expect. There’s usually 73 dumb comments by people who didn’t actually read the article. Pipe up and let others know there’s high-quality info in here!

I’m also making a push to keep the conversation going over at the Mighty Fit Facebook Group. If you haven’t yet joined the group, do so. It’s where I spend the most time answering questions and helping people get the most out of their training.