Keep that New Year's fitness resolution with vet-owned supplements - We Are The Mighty
Military Life

Keep that New Year’s fitness resolution with vet-owned supplements

February is here, football season is over, and Spring is around the corner. Summer — swimsuit season — will soon be upon you. There’s no more time for excuses; kick your fitness regimen into high gear.


You know, the regimen you resolved to implement just one month ago.

Eighty percent of New Year’s resolutions fail. The gym you joined is banking on you not going. Ever. There are many statistics about the military-veteran community. This doesn’t have to be one of them. Enter Ranger Nutrition.

Scott Hardesty was a 26-year-old Army Airborne Ranger. During one jump, he hit the ground with a partially-deployed chute — and he hit it hard. Now, he’s a disabled veteran who struggles with back issues daily.

Working out keeps those issues from overtaking his entire life.

Like many people who train daily, he takes supplements to augment his workouts. And, like many of us, he found so much of what was out there to be unappealing and even found some outright ineffective. Unlike many people, Hardesty has chemist friends at UC Berkeley.

We were at dinner,” Hardesty says, “And eventually you get around to complaining. Protein tastes like chalk, pre-workout makes me shake, and BCAAs taste terrible.

Their response: “Wanna make some stuff?”

What they came up with are American-made, all-natural supplements that actually taste good and work like they’re supposed to.

Keep that New Year’s fitness resolution with vet-owned supplements
Scott Hardesty, founder and Army Ranger, uses his own products.

Hardesty let his friends try what they made and they loved it.

So, Scott Hardesty decided to make more — more of the products he wanted to take. In the video above, he even shows off his personal workout mixes, using Ranger Nutrition products. Eventually, he made it a business.

Ranger Nutrition is more than just a responsible, vet-owned business. It’s in a partnership with Lift for the 22, a veteran-run organization that provides gym memberships to disabled vets, free of charge.


Hardesty is good friends with Lift for the 22’s founder, Carter Davis, and donates five percent of all Ranger Nutrition sales to the organization.

Ranger Nutrition products do really taste good and perform exactly as they say they do. No shakiness, no nausea, and they’re easily stackable. Best of all, if you aren’t into powders or shakes, they have many products in pill form.

If you do like powders, Ranger Candy BCAA tastes far better than anything at GNC (and it’s actually really good) and speeds recovery time to a very noticeable degree. It’s an amazing product.

The other standouts are Ranger’s Whey Protein shakes (the first that didn’t make me wretch) and the XT Catalyst combined with MAXXOUT pre-workout — both amazing for weight training days. Ranger’s pre-workout also kicked cardio sessions into another level.

Keep that New Year’s fitness resolution with vet-owned supplements
Ranger Nutrition’s product line.

You can buy Ranger Nutrition products from its website. Hardesty even invites purchasing just a sample pack — you won’t be disappointed.

I wanted to create products I wanted to take,” Hardesty says. “Ones that I wish I could have taken while I was active in my military career. If you are ready to take your workouts to an entirely different level of performance, give our products a try. You will be extremely glad you did.

Catch more of Scott Hardesty’s fitness tips on American Grit.

MIGHTY TRENDING

4 most annoying assumptions female veterans absolutely hate

Let’s face it, with more women than ever serving in the military, not to mention in combat positions, there’s still a lack of acknowledgment for female veteran service (and quite often this comes from our own brothers-in-arms). Female veterans are in a unique position; the military tends to be associated with the high-and-tight haircut on, well, a man, but modern technology and shifting mindsets mean there are more women serving than ever before.


Still, we all look different, have different grooming habits while out of uniform, and remain subject to stereotypes.

Most of us still encounter the look of surprise when someone realizes we served. Usually, people thank us for our service or ask questions about military life, but inevitably, we also get judgment and assumptions. Here are a few of the worst:

4. Assuming a woman could never have been in the military based on her appearance

Keep that New Year’s fitness resolution with vet-owned supplements
Ask this Soldier if she’s weak. I dare you. (Images via Pin-Ups for Vets)

The problem female veterans face, during service and when they get out of the military, is that people automatically judge a woman based on appearance.

The reality is veterans come in all shapes, sizes, and genders, but when women decide to reclaim some femininity, they are looked down upon or disregarded as vets. It’s a lose-lose situation when lipstick and colored hair are equated with loss of veteran credibility.

3. Assuming anything about a woman’s mental health status based on gender or career field AFSC/MOS

Keep that New Year’s fitness resolution with vet-owned supplements
Women serving their country need the same support as men. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Russell Klika)

We all know career fields in the military are not created equal as far as physical stress or deployment tempos go. People may assume that administrative careers in the military, and anything other than combat positions, don’t get exposed to trauma. This simply isn’t true. First of all, you don’t have to go beyond the wire to be attacked, but more importantly, trauma is experienced in many forms — a veteran’s experience is between them and their doctor.

Women of all career fields deploy, and many come home with PTSD from traumatic events they experience during their time overseas — just like men. According to the U. S. Department of Veteran Affairs, “among women Veterans of the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, almost 20 of every 100 (or 20%) have been diagnosed with PTSD.”

What these numbers don’t reflect are the women who have not sought help and been diagnosed for their PTSD. Also, these are just the statistics for Iraq and Afghanistan — they don’t mention every other conflict that women served in. Women work, fight, come home, and live with what they experience, exactly like their male counterparts.

Furthermore, it doesn’t take a deployment to be affected by the life-and-death stress situations the military demands.

2. Assuming female veterans are lesbians

Keep that New Year’s fitness resolution with vet-owned supplements
Careful, your ignorance is showing.

Now, this is almost a joke to even mention because it seems so far-fetched, but it is more common than one would think! There is nothing wrong with being a lesbian or any other sexuality, for that matter, but for some reason, when women tell people that they are veterans, many are then met with assumptions about their sexual orientation. Well, I guess since it needs to be said: not all women who serve are attracted to other women.

It doesn’t take a scientist to figure out that military service and sexual orientation are unrelated. Yes, women who have served and are serving need to be able to throw femininity to the side regularly to get the job done, but that doesn’t mean sexuality changes as soon as it’s time to get our hands dirty.

Women can be feminine and brave at the same time, and neither of these things has to do with who they’re attracted to.

1. Assuming a woman is the spouse of a veteran and not a veteran herself

Keep that New Year’s fitness resolution with vet-owned supplements
Femininity does not equal weakness.

Statistically, this at least has a little merit. Nevertheless, showing up to a VA appointment and being asked, “Who’s your husband?” is frustrating. It doesn’t just happen at the VA, but also at Veteran Resource Centers, American Legions, and anywhere where there is an abundance of veterans present.

It might not seem like this is such a big deal, but the assumption behind the question is that women don’t serve in the military — or worse, that we can’t serve. Plus, it gets exhausting trying to explain why we joined and how we fared “in a man’s world.”

Bottom line: the military isn’t just a man’s world anymore.

Military Life

Here are the best military photos for the week of January 20th

In the military, you never know what the week will bring. Thankfully, there are some very talented photographers in the ranks and they’re always capturing what life as a service member is like, both in training and at war. Here are the best military photos of the week:


Air Force:

Defense Secretary James N. Mattis speaks with Col. Joseph Kunkel, 366th Fighter Wing commander, after a town hall meeting at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Jan. 16, 2018. Mattis met with base leadership and fielded questions from Airmen during the town hall.

Keep that New Year’s fitness resolution with vet-owned supplements
(U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Malissa Armstrong)

A B-52 Stratofortress navigator, assigned to the 23rd Expeditionary Bomb Squadron, provides overview of different radars during a strategic bomber mission over Europe, on Jan. 16, 2018. The deployment of strategic bombers to RAF Fairford, England, helps exercise United States Air Forces in Europe’s forward operating location for bombers. Training with joint partners, allied nations and other U.S. Air Force units help the 5th Bomb Wing contribute to ready and postured forces.

Keep that New Year’s fitness resolution with vet-owned supplements
(U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Trevor T. McBride)

Army:

Cpl. Kevin Johnson (right), a Norfolk, Virginia native and a human resource specialist assigned to the Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, Fort Riley, Kansas, shows photos from his hometown to a group of students at an elementary school in Nowa Sol, Poland on Jan. 17, 2018. The purpose of the visit was to give the students the opportunity to learn more about the U.S. military and its involvement in Atlantic Resolve.

Keep that New Year’s fitness resolution with vet-owned supplements
(U.S. Army photo by Spc. Hubert D. Delany III / 22nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

U.S. Army Paratrooper assigned to the 1st Battalion, 503rd Infantry Regiment, 173rd Airborne Brigade engages a pop-up targets with M249 light machine gun during the marksmanship training at Cao Malnisio Range, Pordenone, Italy, Jan. 16, 2018. The 173rd Airborne Brigade is the U.S. Army Contingency Response Force in Europe, capable of projecting ready forces anywhere in the U.S. European, Africa, or Central Commands’ areas of responsibility.

Keep that New Year’s fitness resolution with vet-owned supplements
(U.S. Army Photos by Davide Dalla Massara)

Navy:

Belgian Commander Peter Ramboer (L), incoming Standing NATO Mine Countermeasures Group One (SNMCMG1) Commander, congratulates outgoing SNMCMG1 Commander Gvido Laudups as he receives the NATO Flag representing the conclusion of his command during the SNMCMG1 operational handover ceremony at Zeebrugges Marine Base, in Belgium.

Keep that New Year’s fitness resolution with vet-owned supplements
(Photo by FRAN CPO Christian Valverde/Released.)

Capt. Robert Jacoby, right, and Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Raymond Bedard, from Expeditionary Resuscitative Surgical System 19, prepare medical supplies aboard Royal Fleet Auxiliary ship Cardigan Bay during exercise Azraq Serpent 18. Azraq Serpent 18 is a bilateral exercise between the U.K. Royal Navy and the U.S. Navy dedicated to developing interoperability between partners across the medical domain in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations.

Keep that New Year’s fitness resolution with vet-owned supplements
(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kevin J. Steinberg/Released)

Marine Corps:

Hospital Corpsman Petty Officer 2nd Class Jonathan High, a Combat Skills Training instructor, teaches Soldiers with the Japan Ground Self Defense Force how to applying gauze to a simulated wound during Exercise Iron Fist, January 16, 2018. Exercise Iron Fist is an annual bilateral training exercise where U.S. and Japanese service members train together and share technique, tactics and procedures to improve their combined operational capabilities.

Keep that New Year’s fitness resolution with vet-owned supplements
(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Robert Alejandre)

A Japan Ground Self Defense Force soldier leaves a pool during a Marine Corps intermediate swim qualification as part of exercise Iron Fist Jan. 16, 2018. Iron Fist brings together U.S. Marines from the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit and Soldiers from the Japan Ground Self Defense Force, Western Army Infantry Regiment, to improve bilateral planning, communicating, and conduct combined amphibious operations.

Keep that New Year’s fitness resolution with vet-owned supplements
(U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Cpl. Jacob A. Farbo)

Coast Guard:

A 45-foot Response Boat-Medium boat crew from Station Maui patrol off the coast during Operation Kohola Guardian, Jan. 16, 2018. Operation Kohola Guardian is a cooperative effort between state and federal agencies to reduce risk to mariners and whales in Hawaiian waters while supporting conservative efforts to ensure future generations have the opportunity to experience these animals in their natural habitat.

Keep that New Year’s fitness resolution with vet-owned supplements
(U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Amanda Levasseur/Released)

Members of the Hurricane Maria ESF-10 response work to dewater vessels impacted by the hurricane in Palmas del Mar, Puerto Rico, Jan. 16, 2018. The team was comprised of members of the Coast Guard and local salvage crews, working in the ESF-10 effort to remove the boats that were stranded in the hurricane. The ESF-10 is offering no-cost options for removing these vessels; affected boat owners are asked to call the Vessel Owner Outreach Hotline at (786) 521-3900

Keep that New Year’s fitness resolution with vet-owned supplements
(U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Lara Davis)

Military Life

5 reasons your troops are more important than promotion

If there’s one complaint common across the military, it’s that commanders too often care more about their careers than the well-being of their troops. It’s problematic when higher-ups are willing to put lower enlisted through hell if it means they look good at the end of the day.


Troops are quick to recognize this behavior but, unfortunately, commanders don’t see it in themselves or they just don’t care. There are plenty of cases, though, in which a leader will stick their neck out for the sake of their subordinates at the risk of their own career — because they understand what it means to be a leader.

This doesn’t mean you should be soft. It means that you should think about being in your troops’ shoes and understand the sheer magnitude of unnecessary bullsh*t they go through.

Here’s why leaders need to care more about their troops and less about their promotion.

Keep that New Year’s fitness resolution with vet-owned supplements

Tough love without the love is tough.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Emmanuel Ramos)

They’re essentially your children

No one like to feel unwanted — and that’s exactly what it feels like to have a commander who cares more about their career. It just results in unnecessary misery across the board.

Keep that New Year’s fitness resolution with vet-owned supplements

They’ll even charge into battle behind you.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Ally Beiswanger)

Troops respond to care with motivation

As previously mentioned, troops know when you’re only after a promotion. Once they pick up on it, they’re going to be reluctant to follow you anywhere. When it becomes clear that you do care, it motivates them to want to work for you. When your troops are motivated, they’ll follow you anywhere.

Keep that New Year’s fitness resolution with vet-owned supplements

Respect is a two-way street.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Chief Warrant Officer 2 Pete Thibodeau)

You gain more respect

If you rely on your rank to get your respect, you’re going to have a bad time. Your goal as a leader should be to earn the respect of your subordinates by being the commander who gives a sh*t.

Here’s a tip: if a troop comes to you with a problem that doesn’t need to be reported to someone above you, handle it in-house. Your goal should be to do everything you can to avoid having your troops crucified if they don’t deserve it.

Keep that New Year’s fitness resolution with vet-owned supplements

Maybe your sign will look less and less like this over time.

(Terminal Lance)

They’ll follow the rules

This may not always be true but when troops respect you, they’ll go out of their way to make sure you look good because they want you to succeed and climb through the ranks. After all, kids want to impress their parents by doing good things.

Keep that New Year’s fitness resolution with vet-owned supplements

They’ll be happy to do things like this for you, but only after you earn respect…

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Alejandro Pena)

They’ll understand when they have to do something stupid

If your troops know you’re the type who won’t ask them to needlessly do stupid tasks, they won’t blame you when you have to. Instead, they’ll blame someone above you for giving you such a task to pass down and understand that you aren’t trying to make their lives miserable.

In fact, they may even start to take initiative for minor tasks so you won’t have to ask them to do it.

MIGHTY TRENDING

5 awesome perks of an Air Force Afghanistan deployment

Everyone knows the Air Force has some cushy accommodations and, as a result, they often get flack from the other branches. It’s pretty obvious that most of these jokes stem from pure envy. Let’s face it, the Air Force is the youngest of all the branches and they get the best that Mom and Dad have to offer, even on deployments.


Keep that New Year’s fitness resolution with vet-owned supplements

That’s what we call an Air Force MRE.

(Photo by Master Sergeant Christian Amezcua)

Surf and turf Fridays

In 2018, every Friday at Bagram Air Base, Afghanistan, the dining facility served surf and turf. It might not be the best quality steak or lobster, but who else gets steak and lobster on deployments!? Between steak and lobster dinners, the daily dishes are pretty up to par, taste-wise. There’s definitely no carrot pound cake or chili mac being served in this chow hall. Okay, I lied — there is chili mac, but it doesn’t resemble that sh*t found in MREs.

Everyone knows WiFi is essential to an Airman’s way of life.

Photo by Chad Garland of Stars and Stripes)

Free WiFi in work areas

You heard that right: free WiFi in the work areas is the norm for Airmen in Afghanistan. There’s WiFi provided by certain companies in sleeping quarters, but personnel pay upwards of .00 per month for access. To save some of that deployment bankroll, many Airmen spend a portion of their days off in or near their workplace to mooch off that sacred WiFi signal.

Keep that New Year’s fitness resolution with vet-owned supplements

Is this why they call it the Chair Force?

(U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Joe Yanik)

Movie night

It’s okay, laugh it up — but I bet forward operating bases’ don’t provide a makeshift movie theater with recliners where you can watch newly released films every Saturday and Sunday night. An Airman can watch a new movie that’s currently out in theaters every single weekend of their deployment if they choose to do so. Services also provides free, all-you-can-eat popcorn!

Keep that New Year’s fitness resolution with vet-owned supplements

Running can be fun, right?

(U.S. Air Force)

5K fun runs

There are 5K fun runs almost every month, held on the main boulevard at Bagram Air Base. You can choose to run in formation, run in your flack vest and helmet, or even walk! It’s all about getting that exercise in and making the days a little less monotonous. All that Netflix binging on work WiFi can get tiresome. Woe is us.

Keep that New Year’s fitness resolution with vet-owned supplements

Above, Kandahar Air Base Afghanistan where you can find a T.G.I. Fridays and KFC.

A taste of home

Tired of dining-facility surf and turf and instant coffee? Go to the on-base Green Beans Coffee, get a Chai Latte, and, while you’re at it, stop by Pizza Hut next door and order a pepperoni pie. Sure, the pepperoni doesn’t taste like pepperoni and kind of smells like fish, but beggars can’t be choosers, right? If you want to pick up some new headphones or something to read while you sip on that Chai, the Bagram BX is stocked with all the amenities you’d find at home.

This post originally published on WATM in 2018. But we still feel the same way about the cushiness of Air Force Deployments.

MIGHTY MONEY

This meditation company is giving away free downloads to veterans

Keep that New Year’s fitness resolution with vet-owned supplements
Deployed Soldiers, sailors, airmen, Marines, coalition partners and civilians go relax as they finish the largest Yoga session to take place in Qatar history July 11, 2015 at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar.


A meditation company with an iTunes app is offering free downloads to veterans. Meditation Studios has developed 200 meditation tracks that can be downloaded through their app in the iTunes store.

Through a recent partnership with Give Back, the company created the Veterans Collection, a unique series of meditations that are designed to help veterans improve their focus, relieve stress, and encourage better sleep.

In a statement to We Are the Mighty, Meditation Studios said:

Please enjoy these complimentary meditations from Meditation Studio App. For more from this collection, download the app. The guided meditations in the Veterans collection will help to improve focus, relieve stress, encourage better sleep and generally bring more peace of mind. The mind can be a great source of distress when it’s out of control. When we can relax, pause or slow the mind down, it becomes a source of consolation and peace. As we learn to meditate, we learn to recognize emotions, thoughts and sensations without reacting to them. It helps us to respond more thoughtfully, without impulse or overreaction. This can be very comforting, giving veterans more control over the thoughts and emotions that accompany a return from deployment.

The downloads are available through the app, or through SoundCloud. The app, which is $3.99 and has high ratings, features unlimited access to all of the company’s meditations and courses; population and situation specific mediations; step-by-step “courses” with instruction on proper meditation; meditations in various lengths to fit into busy schedules; a section for tracking progress, scheduling meditations, and an in-app calendar.

The meditations offered by Meditation Studios are Self Care and Relax and Energize.

An uncontrolled study published in Military Medicine in June, 2011 found that meditation among Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom combat veterans with moderately severe post traumatic stress “may have helped to alleviate symptoms of PTSD and improve quality of life in veterans of OEF/OIF with combat-related PTSD.”

A similar study by the Army in 2013 determined that meditation could have a positive impact on PTSD, and noted that more research was needed.

The VA notes that meditation, when combined with other treatments, may “improve outcomes” of treatment.

Articles

8 tips for ‘skating’ in the military

Each year thousands of men and women enter the military with different expectations. Some end up making their military service a career, while others call it a day after completing their first contract.


Whatever you decide, here’s a few tips on making those first enlisted years as manageable as possible.

1. Learn To Negotiate

It’s well known that the E-4 and below run the show. Since you probably fall into this demographic, you get told what to do more than you get to tell others.

Find out a few job perks your MOS or rate has that others may value and consider trading goods or services for it.

For instance: There’s a company-wide hike approaching, and you don’t feel like taking part. Get to know the staff at your local medical clinic and strike up a deal to get you out in exchange for something you have or can do for them later.

2. Out Of Sight — Out Of Mind

Staying under the radar can take the time to plan and practice to master. Knowing every nook and cranny in your general area can be useful when the boss enters with a job in mind and you need a place to hide.

3. Request Special Liberty

Here’s a sneaky little strategy that many might overlook.

Service members in good standing can get approved for free days off that won’t count against their accumulated leave days. Commands don’t advertise this option as much to their personnel when they submit single-day leave requests, but you can still ask for one.

The key to getting this option approved is to find a low-Karmic risk reason why you “need” a particular day off.

Note: You don’t want the false reason you use to ever come true. Choose wisely.

4. Volunteer for day time events

Morale, Wellness, and Recreation, or “MWR” is a non-profit organization that sponsors various entertainment events that are intended to boost the morale of all active duty members. The MWR members are primarily made up of volunteers themselves and are constantly looking for help.

The majority of MWR events are held during the afternoon. So you may have to cut out of work early to attend — and who wants to do that, right?

5. Put on a serious face

Most people tend to avoid conversation with another person who appears to be in deep thought or a bad mood. So use this look to your advantage when you just don’t feel like listening to people.

Consider using a prop like a clipboard to strengthen the effect.

Keep that New Year’s fitness resolution with vet-owned supplements
Team America (Source: Paramount/Screenshot)

6. Have a lookout

Skating isn’t always a solo effort — it can sometimes take a whole team to pull off correctly.

Your seniors were at some point a part of the E-4 Mafia where they learned the art of skating. Depending on your location, you may not have the proper viewing to spot when your first sergeant or chief comes barreling around the corner discovering you and your comrades playing grab ass.

Consider putting a lookout in a designed spot to warn everyone of the inbound coffee mug holding boss breaches the area. Also take turns on the lookout position. No one wants to only hear the fun.

Keep that New Year’s fitness resolution with vet-owned supplements

7. Roll Call

Another one that calls for some backup.

The military’s made up of a lot of moving parts. People come and go handling various tasks throughout the day.

As long as you’re accounted for during roll call, you’ve pretty much got the upper hand on skating through whatever job lies ahead.

Here’s how.

When a roll call starts, someone holding a clipboard, probably sporting a serious face like we talked about earlier will sound off a list of names from a sheet of paper. Once they hear the word “here!” shouted back to them they assume that’s the person they just called out for even if they haven’t lifted their eyes from the paper.

This works if the person calling out the names can’t put faces to those names or is in on the “skating.”

Have your buddies’ back if they are off skating somewhere, just make sure when you do it, they repay the favor.

8. Get your driver’s license

Driving a military vehicle on base requires the operator to have a special license. Getting the qualification can take some practice and concentration, but once you familiarize yourself with the multi-ton vehicle, you become an asset to the higher ups now that you can drive them around.

Keep that New Year’s fitness resolution with vet-owned supplements
Instead of taking part in a 10-mile hike in a full combat load, you could drive the safety vehicle. Think about it.

Can you think of any other? Comment below.

Articles

Here’s how medical aid stations handle mass casualty situations

When you’re forward deployed fighting the enemy, people are going to get hurt— it’s the nature of the job. One aspect our military excels at is reaching its severely wounded troops with medical treatment quickly.


A mass casualty situation, however, is a problem. A mass casualty situation means any amount of injured patients that exceeds the number of resources available.

For example, if five soldiers become wounded on the battlefield and there is only one medic or corpsmen on deck, and they’re unable to treat their victims quick enough, that’s a mass casualty or “mass-cas.”

It happens more than you think.

The real problem is the medical aid stations (or battalion aid stations) only have so many personnel on deck and can’t take care of everyone at the same time — that’s when it’s time to call for back-up.

Boom!

An IED just went off a few miles away from the medical aid station. The medic or corpsman on deck is unhurt but now has to spring into action and rapidly start checking the wounded to account for the worst injuries. After they check their patients, the R.O., or Radio Operator, will call up a medevac, sending vital information to the aid station about the incoming troops.

Related: 5 key differences between Army medics and Navy corpsmen

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The interior of an aid station. Hopefully a place you’ll never have to visit.

Medical aid stations work like a well-oiled machine, and the staff members know their exact roles.

Typically, an aid station consists of a few doctors, a few nurses, and a few medics or Corpsmen. Once the wounded enter the medical station, their life status is quickly re-determined. Although the medic did this earlier in the field, the aid station will reassess using the same process of triage, as the patient’s status could have changed during transport.

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Mass casualty triage cards

The color that’s issued reflects the order in which the patient is seen. Treatment can be especially challenging because medical stations are temporary facilities and they don’t always have the most advanced technology; most get their power from gas-powered generators.

Also Read: This is how medical evacuations have evolved over the last 145 years

Keep that New Year’s fitness resolution with vet-owned supplements
U.S. Army soldiers litter transport a simulated injured patient to the Charlie medical tent during Joint Readiness Training in Fort Polk, Louisiana.

In the event the casualty needs to move to an upper echelon of care, a helicopter will be called up to transport them to a more capable hospital. This could also have happened while in the field. Since time is the biggest factor, getting the wounded to the closest aid station is key.

Based on the triage label color issued by the medical staff, that evacuation could take minutes or up to 24 hours. So you may have to sit tight if you’re just nursing a broken arm.

Articles

NASA astronauts train with Air Force survival school instructors

Four NASA astronauts trained with U.S. Air Force Survival School instructors in water survival and recovery at the fitness center pool [at Fairchild AFB, Washington].


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Four NASA astronauts sit in with a class of survival school students being briefed on life raft procedures at Fairchild Air Force Base, Wash., Feb. 10, 2017. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ryan Lackey)

Four NASA astronauts sit in with a class of survival school students being briefed on life raft procedures at Fairchild Air Force Base, Wash., Feb. 10, 2017. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ryan Lackey

The astronauts underwent the training in preparation for anticipated test flights of the new commercially made American rockets, the Boeing CST-100 Starliner and the SpaceX Dragon.

Also read: This is what it’s like to feel zero G aboard NASA’s ‘Vomit Comet’

“It’s a different space program now,” said astronaut Sunita Williams. “We’re flying in capsules instead of shuttles, and they can land anywhere. You never know when an emergency situation may happen, so we’re grateful to get this training.”

The astronauts were put through the paces of bailing out from a simulated crash landing in water. They learned to deploy and secure a life raft, rescue endangered crew members, avoid hostile forces and experience being hoisted into a rescue vehicle.

“This is the first time we’ve gotten a complete environmental training experience — lots of wind, waves and rain,” said astronaut Doug Hurley. “This is a great way to experience how bad it can get and how important it is to be prepared.”

Trained With Course’s Students

The astronauts opted to join in with more than 20 water survival course students, despite being given the option to train alone.

“They didn’t want to train on their own,” said Air Force Lt. Col. Chas Tacheny, the chief of NASA human space flight support in Houston. “They wanted to train with the group, because some of these people may one day be preforming search and rescue for them.”

Other NASA astronauts visited the survival school last year in an effort to research and test the viability of its training course and facilities. The astronauts liked what they experienced, and NASA has since developed its training partnership with the schoolhouse.

“The [survival, evasion, resistance and escape] instructors are advising us in water recovery,” Behnken said. “These experts are the most experienced I’ve ever seen. They are able to spot holes in our training and fill the gaps.”

NASA’s Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory in Houston has a large water training facility built to simulate weightless conditions during space walks, but it’s not properly equipped to simulate water surface conditions for recovery training.

This training is vital for future mission recovery operations, Behnken said, noting that NASA officials are working with the experts here to replicate the survival school water survival training equipment at the Houston facility.

Impressive Facilities

“I’m impressed by the use of the facilities here,” Williams said. “It’s a small space, but they really manage to simulate all kinds of weather conditions and situations we might experience during a water landing.”

The survival school originally had a separate detachment at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida, where it conducted water survival training in open ocean waters. The training was brought to Fairchild in August 2015 in an effort to save time and money by consolidating training at one location.

“It was a good decision for the Air Force to streamline our training efforts by moving all portions of water survival training here,” said Air Force Col. John Groves, the 336th Training Group commander. “However, the fitness center pool was designed for recreational use and isn’t suited to the ever-increasing demands placed on it by our training programs. Bottom line, we owe it to our airmen and mission partners such as NASA, who rely on our unique training capabilities, to have a purpose-built water survival training facility.”

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A brief history of US troops playing cards – and a magician’s trick honoring veterans

War can be hell…and war can be absolute boredom. There are few better ways to pass the time than by playing cards. Anyone who served in the military and made it past basic training probably ended up in a game of cards with their fellow troops.


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Photo taken by an 82d Airborne paratrooper during WWII. (Portraits of War)

They’re easy to carry: small and lightweight, they fit into a rucksack, duffel bag, or Alice pack without having to sacrifice any piece of essential gear. Plus, they’re cheap. It just makes sense that the troops and playing cards would pair so well together.

The Bicycle Playing Card Company recounts the history of American troops and playing cards, though many other nations’ militaries also have a tradition of playing cards in their downtime. It just beats sitting around thinking about everything that could go wrong in a battle. As one Civil War soldier said, “Card playing seemed to be as popular a way of killing time as any.”

Wartime decks have been used to help soldiers in the field learn about their enemies and allies, to identify aircraft, and even teach a little about American history. Even in the 2003 Invasion of Iraq, American forces used playing cards to identify the most wanted members of Saddam Hussein’s regime.

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These cards are probably well-known by now.

Also Read: This is how POWs got playing cards with secret escape maps for Christmas

Playing cards themselves can be traced back to 12th century China. Some scholars think they made their way to Europe through Italian traders. The cards (and maybe even the games) predate the United States. But Americans have their own love affair with cards, and the military is no different.

Early special decks were released depicting Presidents Washington, Jefferson, Jackson, and (John Quincy) Adams as the kings of the deck. By the time of the Civil War, playing cards were in every American camp, Union or Confederate.

Since troops in the Civil War spent a lot of time in camp and had easy access to decks, alcohol, and firearms, a cheater could make the game go very badly for himself. The war actually shaped the way playing cards are printed, so players could hold a tighter hand.

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Another innovation of that era was the design on the backs of cards. Before then, most were made with plain backs, ones that were easy to mark and see through. The new back designs made short work of that problem.

In 1898, the Consolidated Playing Card Company created a cheap deck and poker chips for troops deploying to the Spanish-American War. For World War I, the U.S. Playing Card Company released special decks just for a few specialties of service in the Great War, namely Artillery, Navy, Air Corps, and Tank Corps. The German High Command in WWI considered the game so important to morale, they called the cards kartonnen wapens – cardboard weapons.

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German soldiers playing cards on the Western front in the summer of 1916. (Playing Card Museum)

Many playing card factories converted to war production during World War II, but that certainly didn’t mean no decks were printed. The aforementioned cards used to identify aircraft, known as “spotter cards,” were essential to the war effort.

During the Vietnam War, playing card companies sent deployed soldiers and Marines special decks comprised of just the ace of spades, believing the Viet Cong considered the symbol to be a deadly serious omen.

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As late as 2007, American forces were given decks meant to inform them about important cultural and historical relics in the countries to which they deployed.

Watch below as magician Justin Flom recounts the oft-told story of a Revolutionary War soldier and his deck of cards, which acts as his bible, calendar, and almanac. Be sure to watch til the end for a magician’s tribute to American troops overseas.

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Navy SEALs are cracking down on drug use

The Navy’s elite SEAL teams have taken on a lot of America’s enemies, and have proceeded to kick ass and take names. Now, though, they are facing a potential challenge from within — a streak of drug use.


According to a report by CBSNews.com, five SEALs were kicked out for drug use in a three-month period late last year, prompting a safety stand-down.

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Navy SEALs retreat after a training exercise. (U.S. Navy photo)

“I feel like I’m watching our foundation, our culture, erode in front of our eyes,” Capt. Jamie Sands, Commodore of Naval Special Warfare Group 2, said in a video of a meeting carried out during the December 2016 stand-down.

“I feel betrayed,” Sands added. “How do you do that to us? How do you decide that it’s OK for you to do drugs?”

One of three SEALs who went to CBS News outlined some of the drugs allegedly being used.

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Navy SEALs train. (Photo from Wikimedia Commons)

“People that we know of, that we hear about have tested positive for cocaine, methamphetamine, heroin, marijuana, ecstasy,” the SEAL said in an interview. CBS disguised the SEAL’s voice and concealed his identity.

Leadership in Naval Special Warfare Group 2 viewed the drug use situation as “staggering,” according to the CBS News report. One of the SEALs who went to CBS said that “it has gotten to a point where he had to deal with it.”

“I hope he’s somebody that we can rally behind and hold people accountable, but I’m not sure at this point,” the SEAL added.

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One thing Sands has done has been to carry out drug testing even when away from their home bases, something not always done in the past.

“We’re going to test on the road,” Sands told the SEALs in a video released to CBS News. “We’re going to test on deployment. If you do drugs, if you decide to be that selfish individual, which I don’t think anyone’s going to do after today — I believe that — then you will be caught.”

During the stand-down, drug testing was done, and one SEAL who had earlier tested positive for cocaine ended up testing positive again, this time for prescription drugs. That SEAL is being kicked out.

Military Life

Here are the best military photos for the week of November 25th

The military has very talented photographers in the ranks, and they’re always capturing what life as a service member is like during training and at war. Here are the best military photos of the week:


Air Force:

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Rafael Vasco, front, and Master Sgt. Steven C. Harlow Jr., both Phoenix Raven Team Members with the 514th Security Forces Squadron, 514th Air Mobility Wing, provide security during a final check prior to taking off from Toussaint Louverture International Airport, Port-au-Prince, Republic of Haiti, Nov. 18, 2017. The 732nd Airlift Squadron, which is assigned to the 514th, delivered 76,410 pounds of food comprised of packages of fortified rice and soy protein and barley grass juice powder mix to the Foundation Mission de l’Espoir (Mission of Hope). The delivery was possible because the Denton Program enables donors to use available space on U.S. military cargo aircraft to transport humanitarian goods and equipment to countries in need. The 514th is located at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J.

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(U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Mark C. Olsen)

Staff Sgt. Manuel Lastra, an aerial port specialist with the 156th Airlift Wing, fastens down equipment on a WC-130H, Nov. 20, 2017, in St Croix Air Guard Station, U.S. Virigin Islands. The WC-130H is used primarily for cargo transport in the Puerto Rico Air National Guard.

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(U.S. Air National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Daniel J. Martinez)

Army:

A U.S. Army platoon sergeant evaluates Soldiers’ assigned to Lightning Troop, 3rd Squadron, 2d Cavalry Regiment, movement across the objective with the use of phosphorous smoke for concealment during a squad live fire exercise at Bemowo Piskie Training Area, Poland, November 21, 2017.

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(U.S. Army Photo by Capt. Gary Loten-Beckford)

A U.S. Soldier assigned to 2nd Squadron, 12th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, scans for enemies during Decisive Action Rotation 18-02 at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, Calif., Nov. 18, 2017.

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(U.S. Army photo by Spc. Daniel Parrott, Operations Group, National Training Center)

Navy:

An SA-330 Puma delivers cargo during a vertical replenishment aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Preble (DDG 88). Preble is conducting maritime security, forward presence and theater security operations in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations.

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(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Morgan K. Nall)

U.S. Navy Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) Airman James Totten directs an aircraft on the flight deck of the Navy’s forward-deployed aircraft carrier and flagship of Carrier Strike Group Five, USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76), during Annual Exercise 2017 over the Philippine Sea, Nov. 20, 2017. Annual Exercise 2017, the premier training event between the U.S. Navy and the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force, is designed to increase the defensive readiness and interoperability of Japanese and American Forces through training in air and sea operations.

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(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class MacAdam Kane Weissman)

Marine Corps:

U.S. Marines with the Maritime Raid Force (MRF), 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), climb aboard the United States Naval Ship (USNS) Big Horn during a simulated Visit, Board, Search and Seizure (VBSS) mission as part of Combine Composite Unit Training Exercise (COMPTUEX) in the Atlantic Ocean, Nov. 20, 2017. The MRF conducted the VBSS as part of the Combined COMPTUEX to certify the ARG/MEU team in maritime operations for an upcoming deployment at sea.

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(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Jered T. Stone)

U.S. Marines with Fox Company, Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), provide security after at staging area prior to conducting a night mechanized raid at Camp Lejeune, N.C. Nov. 18, 2017, as part of Combined Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX). Combined COMPTUEX serves as the capstone event for the Amphibious Ready Group (ARG)/MEU team prior to deployment, fully integrating the ARG/MEU team as an amphibious force and testing their ability to execute missions across a range of military operations.

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(U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Staff Sgt. Dengrier Baez)

Coast Guard:

A member of the Pacific Paradise response team prepares to dive inside the Pacific Paradise to get measurements of interior compartments on board the vessel grounded off Kaimana Beach, O’ahu, Nov. 20, 2017. The diverse salvage team is improving the watertight integrity of the vessel before buoyancy is added and they attempt to tow it further offshore to an EPA approved disposal site.

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(U.S. Coast Guard Photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class DaVonte Marrow)

A puppy welcomes the Coast Guard Cutter Spencer crew home to Boston, Tuesday, November 21, 2017 following a highly successful 90-day patrol fighting transnational organized crime networks in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, and training for multi-national search and rescue response in the Arctic. The puppy met his new human dad for the first time after the cutter moored up.

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(U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Cynthia Oldham. )

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6 tips we learned from ‘Ferris Bueller’ on how to ‘skate’ in the military

Ferris Bueller is the ultimate skater.


Skating is an art form which most people will never fully learn — until now. In 1986, Paramount pictures released “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off” which taught countless teens how to play sick and get out of school.

Written and directed by the legendary John Hughes, the film focuses on a teenager who embarks on an incredible journey throughout Chicago while being unknowingly stalked by his high school principal.

While taking the day off, Bueller and his two friends learn more about themselves in a day than they would ever expect.

Related: 8 tips for ‘skating’ in the military

So check out our list of how Bueller taught us the art of the skate.

1. Be convincing

First, come up with an epic excuse why you’re unable to partake in a military activity (like going to work), and make sure you sell that sh*t like Bueller sold being sick to his parents.

Getting a “Sick in Quarters” slip is the goal if you’re in the military.

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I hope I look sick enough. (Source: Paramount/Screenshot)

2. Use your assets properly

Unfortunately, Bueller doesn’t have a car to drive himself around. So once he officially earns his day off via his parents, it’s time to get on the phone and find someone to pick you up.

Skating should be a team effort, but make sure you repay the favor and help someone else skate on another day.

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Come over to the barracks and pick me up. (Source: Paramount/Screenshot)

3. Know the loopholes

Here, Bueller hacks the school’s computer absence program and changes how many days he has been absent. You probably won’t have this ability unless you have a special security clearance, but the moral of this story is to understand your limits.

For instance, if your boss isn’t going to be around — you’re not going to be around. Get it? Good.

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Knowing the loopholes will get you far in life. (Source: Paramount/Screenshot)

4. Have an epic backstory

During roll call, Bueller’s name is called out several times before this hot girl (Kristy Swanson) gives the teacher a bullsh*t reason why he isn’t in school. It works well during military roll call when the service member calling out names just wants to get on with the day and not hear any excuses — another loophole.

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How could you not trust this face? (Source: Paramount/Screenshot)

5. Play the role

In the event you get an unknown phone call or run into someone outside your skating circle, divert into the sick mode ASAP.

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Remember act sick. (Source: Paramount/Screenshot)

Also Read: 11 hiding spots for an E-4 to sham

6. Make it a team effort

Ferris uses his best buddy Cameron to impersonate his girlfriend’s dad to get her out of school. Now, you probably won’t have to do all that, but it’s awesome to have military friends who are willing to skate alongside you that you trust.

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Our favorite hypochondriac, Cameron Frye. (Source: Paramount/Screenshot)