What the movies get wrong about blacksmiths - We Are The Mighty
MIGHTY MOVIES

What the movies get wrong about blacksmiths

It’s one of the coolest moments in medieval fantasy films. A blacksmith sweats over the forge, slowly pouring bright-orange, molten iron into an open-topped stone mold of a mighty sword while the audience watches a cool shot of the weapon taking shape.

Go ahead and toss in a shot of the warrior looking on with joy, let the audience watch as they quench the hot blade in snow, a person, or whatever, and presto, our hero has a neat toy for the next scene.

It’s too bad that this isn’t how any of it’s done in real life — and if it were, it’d be a sign of terrible craftsmanship.


What the movies get wrong about blacksmiths

The switch to iron and steel meant that they could make weapons longer without sacrificing durability. Which is important when you’re trying to stab someone without getting stabbed.

(Picture by J.J. Luder)

First, it should be stated that there’s a huge difference between casting a weapon and forging one. Back in the Bronze Age, before blacksmiths knew any better, they would take molten bronze and pour it into a stone cast to create a battle-ready weapon. This is casting.

Bronze was made from mixing copper and tin. For blacksmiths in 1200 BCE, this wasn’t a problem as both were abundant enough. Mankind had known about iron for hundreds of years at this point, but using it required a tremendous effort to create a product that was on par with bronze alternatives. When it was discovered that just a bit of carbon could turn the Earth’s most abundant metal into steel, they embraced the challenge.

Steel makes for stronger, more durable weapons, so blacksmiths began using this metal instead, but the process required was much different. To create something, smiths needed to forge it, starting from a blank (or piece of metal) that was the relative size of the weapon they intended to make, heating it, and painstakingly hammering it into shape.

What the movies get wrong about blacksmiths
(Universal Pictures)

No matter how cool of an opening scene this is, it’s still kinda of wrong.

It’s not impossible to cast iron weapons — but the process will yield a cheap, crude weapon. This works for the Uruk-hai Orcs of The Lord of the Rings, but it’s just not practical for anyone else. This is also how most cheapo swords that medieval fans have on their walls are made. For decorative weaponry, that’s fine, but the blade would probably snap in half given just a bit of pressure.

When you pour the metal into the cast, it’s going to take shape of the mold. Which means that it’s only going to be half made when it’s done with an open-top cast. The other half of the sword will be flat when the metal hardens. If they were to rework the metal into a complete shape after that, it’d defeat the purpose of the mold all together.

If you want a durable weapon made out of anything but bronze and looks beautiful, you’re going to need to forge it. This process can take days — even just to get a standard-looking sword. You’re looking at weeks of master craftsmanship to get the caliber of weapons used by main characters.

Most films opt to go with the more cinematic approach. Bright-red liquid (fun side note: Molten iron heated to the point where it can be cast is actually more of a pale yellow. They’re using aluminum) looks cool when it takes form, but the actual process of making real weapons is far more impressive — even if it takes a lot longer than a montage.

To see how it’s done, check out the video below!

MIGHTY MOVIES

5 real-world covert operations in FX’s “Archer”

If FX’s Archer is known for anything, it’s historical accuracy while inventing daring, new bar drinks. Between Charles Fredric Andrus references and round after round of Green Russians, the top spy at the International Secret Intelligence Service (no, not that ISIS), Malory Archer, and her employees drop casual references to her covert operations in days gone by, revealing just how much experience she has in the world of international intrigue.


What the movies get wrong about blacksmiths

1. Operation Ajax – Reinstalling the Shah of Iran

In season 1, episode 2, a young Archer receives news from Woodhouse that a message from “Mommy and Uncle Kermit” said Ajax was successful and “Tehran is ours.”

What the movies get wrong about blacksmiths

In 1953, the elected Prime Minister of Iran, Mohammed Mossadegh, attempted to nationalize the Iranian oil industry, at that time, dominated by what is today BP Oil. The Shah dismissed Mossadegh but soon fled Iran after the popular politician’s supporters flooded the streets. The CIA, led by Kermit Roosevelt, organized a fake Communist revolution, which galvanized the Iranians (instigated by the CIA and CIA-controlled elements in the Iranian Army) to beating back the Communists. Mossadegh turned himself in to the government while a former Iranian General assumed the Prime Minister’s office. The Shah returned with more absolute power than ever before until he was deposed by the Iranian Revolution of 1979.

What the movies get wrong about blacksmiths
*gasp* Just like the old gypsy woman said!

2. Operation Paperclip – Archer characters recruiting the best of Nazi Germany

In season 2, episode 9, Cyril discovers Dr. Krieger grew up a German-speaking boy in Brazil. When confronted, Cyril corners Krieger in the bathroom and finds out his father was a Nazi scientist, even though Krieger attempted to cover his past. But you can’t hide who you really are.

When Cyril rats Krieger out to Malory, she informs him of all the things Nazi scientists invented after WWII: Microwaves, Rockets, and Tang. She also informed Krueger he might be a clone of Hitler, describing a scenario from the film The Boys from Brazil, which hints at Nazi war criminal Dr. Josef Mengele being Kreiger’s father.

What the movies get wrong about blacksmiths
104 former Nazi scientists pose for a photo in Texas (NASA photo)

 

Operation Paperclip was an initiative of the Office of Strategic Services, forerunner of the CIA, where 1,500 former Nazi scientists were brought to the U.S. after WWII to work the U.S. and deny Nazi research and expertise to the Soviet Union.

3. Operation Gladio – Preparing for the Soviet Invasion of Europe

In season 3, episode 8, Malory enlists ISIS’ help to hide the body of the Italian Prime Minister after he is killed during some, ahem, interesting bedroom tactics. The PM was a target because he was a NATO “stay behind” agent she met during Operation Gladio.

 

What the movies get wrong about blacksmiths
Damn, dog. That’s inappropes. Totes inappropes.

Gladio was supposed to prevent a Communist take over of Western Europe after WWII, though it wasn’t revealed in Italy until 1990. The project covered arms caches, paramilitary organizations, secret bases, and shadow governments in fifteen European countries.

4. Operation PBSUCCESS – Ousting Guatemalan democracy

What the movies get wrong about blacksmiths
Wait… I had something for this…

In season 4, episode 6, Archer is bitten by Caspian Cobra while on a mission to Turkmenistan. During the venom hallucination a cut-rate James Mason takes Archer back to his sixth birthday, waiting for his mom to come back because “Guatemala’s democratically elected government wasn’t gonna overthrow itself.”

What the movies get wrong about blacksmiths
Do you want child soldiers? Because this is how you get child soldiers.

In 1954, the CIA ousted the government of Guatemalan President Jacobo Árbenz and installed a U.S.-friendly dictatorship under Carlos Castillo Armas, the first in a long line. Árbenz was elected in 1950 and continued land and social reforms enacted by his predecessor, which the U.S. government saw as Communist redistribution. A CIA-funded force invaded Guatemala, backed by U.S. propaganda and the threat of a U.S. invasion. The Guatemalan Army refused to fight the 480 CIA trained troops which led to the Guatemalan Civil War, which lasted from 1960 to 1996, and the death of democracy in the country.

5. Iran-Contra Affair – Guns for cash, cash for rebels, maybe hostages

In season 5, the crew dumps the international espionage work and attempts to sell cocaine to restart their business and/or retire forever. Throughout the season the gang tries and fails to sell cocaine, eventually stumbling onto a CIA operation. In a plot to increase its own yearly budget, the CIA paid mercenaries from Honduras to fight San Marcos’ legitimate government to force its President to trade cocaine for arms the CIA purchased from Iran, implying the Archers were in on it from day one. Sounds crazy and overly complex, right?

What the movies get wrong about blacksmiths

This is the same kind of deal members of the Reagan Administration made with Iran and rebel groups in Nicaragua in 1985 (with Archer selling cocaine added in). The Boland Amendment, passed by Congress in 1984 limited the support the U.S. government could give Nicaraguan contras. To circumvent the law, the CIA sold arms to Iran via Israel. (This was during the Iran-Iraq War, and the Middle East picture was slightly different then.) The CIA would use this money to fund the Nicaraguan contras. In exchange for the weapons sales, the Iranians would pressure Lebanese militants to release American hostages held there. President Reagan had no knowledge of the operation but 14 members of his administration were indicted for their actions, eleven were convicted.

What the movies get wrong about blacksmiths
And with a knife hand I give you plausible deniability. (Thanks, Ollie!)

Articles

A fanboy just made this ‘John Wick video’ with Nerf guns and it’s awesome

By any measure, the latest installment of the John Wick franchise is a hit. With a $30 million opening and about $158 million in global box office as of mid-March, “John Wick: Chapter 2” is riding high.


The flick is packed with action, badassery and edge-of-your-seat thrills. But what really stands out about the movie — and what might give it its 90 percent Rotten Tomatoes rating — is the Delta Force-esque gunplay.

The leaked video of “John Wick: Chapter 2” lead man Keanu Reeves punching some paper with tactical training guru Taran Butler in the lead up to the release of the film only helped illustrate how Wick’s got a little Ninja in his blood.

So how do you make the job harder for the assassin of assassins? Ditch the irons and replace them with Nerfs — then see how he does.

Well a YouTube team attempted just that, providing a stand in for Wick and bedecking him with an arsenal of foam and plastic. And what this Nerf John Wick was able to accomplish against 14 assassins will blow your mind.

Articles

4 awesome facts about Shaolin Kung Fu

Shaolin Kung Fu is one of the oldest and most intense forms of Chinese martial arts. Bruce Lee, Jackie Chan, and a number of other martial arts movie stars have also made Kung Fu one of the most famous forms.

What the movies get wrong about blacksmiths

As a part of a religious order, the Shaolin monks were persecuted by Chinese Communists during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution. The temple was mostly destroyed and stayed that way for years. But when Jet Li made “Shaolin Shi,” it was enough to make Mao give in: the temple was rebuilt and some much-needed tourism revenue came in as Kung Fu made a comeback.

Here are a few things you may not have known about Kung Fu and the elite Shaolin Monks.

1. The founder of Shaolin Kung Fu was from India.

Legend has it that the founder of the Shaolin order, a Buddhist monk from India named Bodhidharma, spent nine years meditating in a cave near his monastery. The legend has it that to keep him from falling asleep, the monk cut off his eyelids and threw them on the ground.

What the movies get wrong about blacksmiths
Pre-Workout would not be invented for another 1,500 years.

Green Tea began to grow from the spot where he threw his eyelids and now Buddhist monks use green tea to maintain their focus during meditation.

2. Kung Fu is studied in a “Kwoon.”

The word “dojo” is reserved for places that teach Japanese martial arts, like Aikido. When entering a kwoon, bow at a 45-degree angle with your hands at your chest — the right in a fist, and the left open-palm.

What the movies get wrong about blacksmiths

This represents the yin and yang and that your heart is at peace.

3. Kung Fu practitioners wear a different uniform.

Again, much of the look of the loose-fitting gi and colored belts comes from the Japanese practice. Traditional Chinese Kung Fu doesn’t use colored belt levels (though some Western teachers might use them as a teaching tool). Chinese Kung Fu uses a uniform that is tight at the ankles and sometimes even at the wrists.

What the movies get wrong about blacksmiths

4. The most elite Shaolin monk was a werewolf.

Ok, he wasn’t an actual werewolf. In the late 19th century lived a monk named Tai Jin. The poor guy suffered from a condition known as hypertrichosis. Also known as “Werewolf Syndrome” because of the insane amount of body hair that grows on affected areas.

It might have helped his self-esteem to know that, according to legend, he was the best fighter in all of China.

What the movies get wrong about blacksmiths
No comfort for Chewbacca here.

Tai Jin was abandoned at the monastery as a baby because of his body hair. The monks raised him and trained him. He eventually dedicated himself to one form of martial art. Legend also has it that upon meeting the 12 masters of Shaolin, the boy threw a dagger into the ceiling, killing a would-be assassin. He explained to the masters that he could hear 13 people breathing, not just 12.

For more about the Shaolin monks and their founder, check out the above episode of Elite Forces.

MIGHTY MOVIES

Nobel laureate says HBO series has ‘completely changed perception’ of Chernobyl

Belarus’s Nobel laureate Svetlana Alexievich rolled her eyes when the creators of Chernobyl approached her for permission to use material from her book “Voices From Chernobyl” for the hit HBO miniseries.

“I told my agent, ‘Galya, they’re going to make another film…’ I was far from convinced. The only thing that convinced me, maybe, was the fee,” Alexievich explained in a recent interview with RFE/RL’s Belarusian Service.

However, the five-part miniseries about the tragic accident at the Ukrainian nuclear power plant has raked in rave reviews from critics and viewers alike, and Alexievich is no exception.

“It really impressed me. It is a very strong film. There is something there in the aesthetics that touches the modern consciousness. There is a dose of fear. There is reasoning. There is beauty. That is something that has always worried me about evil, when it’s not out in the open, when so much is confusing.”


And she said that her fellow Belarusians, hard hit by the nuclear fallout scattered into the air when Reactor No. 4 exploded on April 26, 1986, have now had their eyes pried open to the real scale of the tragedy, Alexievich said.

What the movies get wrong about blacksmiths

“We are now witnessing a new phenomenon that Belarusians, who suffered greatly and thought they knew a lot about the tragedy, have completely changed their perception about Chernobyl and are interpreting this tragedy in a whole new way. The authors accomplished this, even though they are from a completely different world — not from Belarus, not from our region,” she explained.

Alexievich said the film has especially struck a chord with young Belarusians.

“It’s no accident that a lot of young people have watched this film. They say that they watch it together in clubs and discuss it. They are different. For them, questions about the environment, especially in the West, it is through that lens that they understand life.”

Alexievich also praised the selection of Johan Renck as director.

“The director is a Swede by nationality. And in the Swedish consciousness there is a deep awareness of the environment,” she said.

Meanwhile, Alexievich’s book has, in turn, received high praise from Craig Mazin, the writer and producer of Chernobyl, who tweeted on June 13, 2019: “I drew historical fact and scientific information from many sources, but Ms. Alexievich’s “Voices From Chernoby”l was where I always turned to find beauty and sorrow.”

From the vintage Soviet furniture and trash bins to the period clothing, Chernobyl has been praised for staying incredibly accurate to detail, even using real dialogue, much of it recorded in Alexievich’s oral history of the disaster, “Voices From Chernobyl.”

“There is a lot of my text in the reactions of the people. For example, when people stand on the bridge and admire the fire. Those are the first impressions following the accident. The world’s, as well. The director even admitted that all of this was created from the book. I have a contract with them and author’s rights of ownership,” Alexievich explained.

Some have suggested that the character of Ulana Khomyuk, a Belarusian nuclear physicist bent on uncovering the truth behind the disaster, is based on Alexievich, although Chernobyl’s creators have said the figure is inspired by a composite of scientists involved in the disaster. Alexievich isn’t convinced the character is based on her either.

“I don’t think they wrote Khomyuk with me in mind. [Eimuntas] Nekrosis (the late Lithuanian theater director) before his death put on a play based on [my] The Boys In Zinc. I was supposedly the main figure, but she was absolutely not like me.”

Alexievich says having a female protagonist like Khomyuk simply made sense, juxtaposing her against Valery Legasov, who was instrumental in the cleanup after the disaster.

“In the film, there is a need for a leading figure, a woman — maybe because they took from my view of life, this sense of femininity, the world of the woman. For me, this is very important. In all my books there are many women heroes, not only in the work The Unwomanly Face Of War. This relationship with the living. A woman is extremely capable of detecting the connection of things. Therefore, it was probably necessary to have a woman, not only Legasov. If there had been two men, there would be no story. They introduced a woman and with a man and a woman you get two perspectives. It is very interesting.”

Chernobyl (2019) | Official Trailer | HBO

www.youtube.com

Asked about some of the inaccuracies in the series that critics have seized on, Alexievich is dismissive.

“First of all, it is a feature film, and the author is entitled to his interpretation and understanding of things. But they say, ‘This minister was fat, old, and now he’s young.’ Or the opposite. Or the windows weren’t like that. If you want to think like that, then if we look at the famous film Battleship Potemkin by Eisenstein, where the baby carriage flies down the steps, then some sailor named Zhalyaznyak would say that that type of revolution never happened. God forbid if the truth about Chernobyl or the gulag system had been in the hands of such people.”

Alexievich noted even Russian media were full of praise for the series, at least at first.

“In the beginning, Russian media was very positive about the series and then probably there was some yelling in the Kremlin and they suddenly became very patriotic. Then there was news they are launching their own series about Chernobyl, about how ‘our’ agents pursue some American spy at the power plant. My God, when I read all this I thought that 30 years have passed and has really nothing changed in the consciousness?”

Despite those initial doubts, Alexievich is convinced that HBO has created a classic with a strong message that she feels needs to be heard.

“Most importantly, I would like that people watch it and think about the type of world we’ve entered with such dangers. And there are more and more. Artificial intelligence, robots. It’s a whole new world.”

This article originally appeared on Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty. Follow @RFERL on Twitter.

MIGHTY MOVIES

These discoveries will break your ‘Jurassic Park’-loving heart

If your image of Tyrannosaurus rex is based on the ferocious creature in “Jurassic Park,” you’ve gotten quite a few things wrong about the “king of the dinosaurs.”

In recent years, paleontologists have been revising the scientific consensus about how T. rex looked, sounded, and ate.

“Everyone’s preconceived ideas of what T. rex acted like and looked like are going to be heavily modified,” Mark Norell, a curator at the American Museum of Natural History, told Business Insider. The museum just opened an exhibit devoted to the dino, called “T. rex: The Ultimate Predator.”


The exhibit showcases the latest research on the prehistoric animal. And as it turns out, these predators started their lives as fuzzy, turkey-sized hatchlings. They also had excellent vision, with forward-facing eyes like a hawk for superior depth perception. And T. rexes couldn’t run — instead, they walked at impressive speeds of up to 25 mph.

But to be fair to Steven Spielberg, only seven or eight T. rex skeletons existed in the fossil record when his classic movie was produced in 1993. Since then, a dozen more skeletons have been discovered, and those bones have changed scientists’ understanding of the creatures.

Here’s what the T. rex was really like when it hunted 66 million years ago, according to the experts at the AMNH.

What the movies get wrong about blacksmiths

Henry Osborn, Fred Saunders, and Barnum Brown on the AMNH scow Mary Jane, 1911.

1. The first T. rex skeleton was discovered in 1902 by Barnum Brown, a paleontologist with the AMNH.

Today, the institution boasts one of the few original T. rex skeletons on display.

Tyrannosaurus rex — from the Greek words for “tyrant” and “lizard” and the Latin word for “king” — lived between 68 million and 66 million years ago, during the late Cretaceous period (just before the asteroid impact that ended the era of the dinosaurs).

2. The T. rex rocked a mullet of feathers on its head and neck, and some on its tail too.

Feathers are rarely preserved in the fossil record, so they haven’t been found on a T. rex specimen. But other dinosaur fossils, including other tyrannosaur species and their relatives, do have preserved feathers.

That means paleontologists can “safely assume” T. rex had feathers as well, Norell said.

Though adult T. rexes were mostly covered in scales, scientists think they had patches of feathers on attention-getting areas like the head and tail.

3. T. rex hatchlings looked more like fluffy turkeys than terrifying predators.

T. rex hatchlings were covered in peach fuzz, much like a duckling. As they aged, they lost most of their feathers, keeping just the ones on the head, neck, and tail.

Most hatchlings didn’t survive past infancy. A baby T. rex had a more than 60% chance of succumbing to predators, disease, accidents, or starvation during its first year of life.

4. T. rex had a fairly short lifespan by human standards. No known T. rex lived past the age of 30.

The T. rex was like “the James Dean of the dinosaurs,” said Gregory Erickson, a paleontologist from Florida State University who consulted on the museum’s new exhibit.

The Hollywood actor, often connected to the famous quote “Live fast, die young, and leave a good-looking corpse,” died in a fiery car crash at the age of 24. T. rexes, similarly, were spectacular but died quite young.

Paleontologists can estimate the age that a dinosaur was when it died by analyzing its fossilized bones, which have growth rings that correspond to its age, much like trees. Experts can count the number of rings to determine its age, as well as compare the spaces between rings to find out how fast the dinosaur was growing at different ages.

5. A T. rex grew from a tiny hatchling to a 9-ton predator in about 18 to 20 years, gaining an unbelievable 1,700 pounds per year.

A full-grown Tyrannosaurus rex weighed about 6 to 9 tons. It stood about 12 to 13 feet tall at the hip and was about 40 to 43 feet long.

6. The “king of the dinosaurs” evolved from a larger group of tyrannosaurs that were smaller and faster.


While the T. rex emerged about 68 million years ago, its tyrannosaur ancestors were 100 million years older than that.

The tyrannosauroidea superfamily consists of two dozen species spanning more than 100 million years of evolution.

7. That evolutionary lineage might explain why T. rex had tiny arms.

For earlier tyrannosaur relatives with smaller bodies, these tiny arms were long enough to grasp prey or pull food into their mouth.

“The earliest tyrannosaur species had arms that were perfectly proportioned,” Erickson said.

He said he thinks T. rex’s puny arms were vestigial — a body part or organ that no longer serves a function but is nevertheless retained (kind of like a human’s appendix or wisdom teeth).

8. An adult T. rex didn’t need its arms to hunt — its massive jaws, filled with sharp teeth that constantly grew back, were enough.

“T. rex was a head hunter,” Norell said. The predator had the rare ability to bite through solid bone and digest it.

Paleontologists know this from the dinosaur’s fossilized poop; they’ve discovered T. rex feces containing tiny chunks of bone eroded by stomach acid.

9. The force of a T. rex bite was stronger than that of any other animal.

T. rex had a bite force of 7,800 pounds, equivalent to the crushing weight of about three Mini Cooper cars. By comparison, the massive saltwater crocodile of northern Australia — which grows to 17 feet and can weigh more than a ton — chomps down with 3,700 pounds of force.

No other known animal could bite with such force, according to museum paleontologists.

10. T. rex was also a cannibal.

Scientists are pretty sure that T. rex ate members of its own species, but they don’t know whether the dinosaurs killed one another or just ate ones that were already dead.

Arguments about whether the dinosaur was a hunter or a scavenger have raged over the years, but “a bulk of the evidence points to T. rex being a predator, not a scavenger,” Erickson said. “It was a hunter, day in and day out.”

What Did a Baby T. rex Look Like? ? Find out in T. rex: The Ultimate Predator (Now Open!)

www.youtube.com

11. The predator had a keen sense of smell, acute vision, and excellent hearing, making it hard for prey to avoid detection.

When “Jurassic Park” came out in 1993, scientists knew only that the T. rex was big and carnivorous and had a small brain, Erickson said.

But now paleontologists know that the dinosaur had some of the largest eyes of any land animal ever.

About the size of oranges, T. rex eyes faced forward like a hawk’s and were spread farther apart on its face than most other dinosaurs’ eyes, giving it superior depth perception during a hunt.

12. One of the biggest differences between the museum’s depiction of T. rex and the images in popular culture is that the real animal appears to be much svelter.

The new model shows a T. rex with even smaller forelimbs than previous ones and more prominent hind limbs.

According to museum paleontologists, an adult T. rex walked with fairly straight legs, much like an elephant. Walking with bent legs would have placed immense stress on its bones and joints, quickly exhausting its leg muscles.

13. So unlike the creature in “Jurassic Park,” the real T. rex couldn’t run. It just walked quickly.

An adult T. rex had a long stride, helping it reach speeds of 10 to 25 mph. But the dinosaur never reached a suspended gait, since it always had at least one leg on the ground at all times.

Juvenile T. rexes, which weighed less than an adult, could run.

14. There are still a few lingering mysteries about T. rex, including what color it was.

In movies and illustrations, the animal is often depicted in drab colors, similar to those of a crocodile. But the new museum exhibit suggests that, since reptiles come in every color, the T. rex could have been brightly colored.

It’s also challenging for experts to determine the sex of the T. rex skeletons they dig up, leaving questions about differences between males and females unanswered as well.

15. Scientists aren’t sure what T. rex sounded like, but the best guesses are based on the dinosaur’s closest living relatives: crocodiles and birds.

A 2016 study suggested that T. rex probably didn’t roar, but most likely cooed, hooted, and made deep-throated booming sounds like the modern-day emu.

This article originally appeared on Business Insider. Follow @BusinessInsider on Twitter.

Articles

This music festival is hitting military bases and we’re amped

A new festival experience is coming to military bases this year and we’re pretty pumped up about it. Base*FEST Powered by USAA will launch at Camp Lejeune this 4th of July weekend and continue the party through Labor Day.


What the movies get wrong about blacksmiths
Did we mention it’s free?

To celebrate, we’ve put together some playlists to get you amped (may I recommend “The Double Tap Ensemble”?) and we’re teaming up with some bad ass vets who will be sharing their own musical inspiration for things like, you know, fighting terrorism and defending the free world.

Also read: 8 epic deployment music videos you need to watch

We’re also powering up with USAA and To The Fallen Entertainment to bring you a music competition that will let veterans and their families bring down the house, so stick around.

Comment below and tell us which song we absolutely cannot leave out of our ultimate Battle Mix.

MIGHTY MOVIES

Robert Downey Jr. might already be back as Iron Man

We loved him 3,000 in Avengers: Endgame, and even gave him an extended tearful goodbye in Spider-Man: Far From Home, but now it looks like Tony Stark might already be back in the Marvel game.

On Sep. 5, 2019, news broke that actor Robert Downey Jr. is already in talks to return as Tony Stark/Iron Man for a new Disney+ TV series. If true, Tony would feature in a show called Iron Heart, based on the Marvel comic book series and character of the same name. In contemporary Marvel comics, “Iron Heart” is the alias for a new version of Iron Man, who is actually a woman named Riri Williams. In the series, Riri takes over the mantle of Iron Man from Tony Stark, who basically retires.


If this all sounds a little like the relationship between Tony and Peter Parker in Spider-Man: Homecoming and the past few Avengers movies, it should. But, because legal issues will likely prevent Spider-Man from crossing over with MCU films ever again, it’s telling that Iron Man may have another successor lined-up.

The only tricky part here, of course, is the simple fact that we all saw Tony Stark die in Avengers: Endgame. It feels pretty unlikely that Marvel would undo Tony’s meaningful sacrifice so soon, particularly if he wasn’t actually the star of a new Marvel film. After all, if an Iron Heart series happens, it will be Riri’s story about learning how to become the titular hero, not Tony’s.

The best bet? Maybe Robert Downey Jr. is coming back to play the voice of Tony Stark, and maybe Iron Heart is just one more installment of the upcoming animated What If? series, which specifically reimagines big Marvel heroes in a Sliding Doors kind-of-way. If that’s the case, then all of this makes sense. But, if Downey Jr. really is back, in the flesh, as Tony Stark, then Marvel has a lot of explaining to do. Plus, we’re going to bet that his daughter, Morgan Stark, is going to want to see him.

This article originally appeared on Fatherly. Follow @FatherlyHQ on Twitter.

MIGHTY MOVIES

Everything Disney just announced in the ‘Star Wars’ lineup

The Walt Disney Company lit up the internet on Dec. 10, announcing exciting new projects for Marvel, NatGeo, ESPN, Pixar, and more. But let’s talk about what’s important: Star Wars.

The Star Wars galaxy is expanding into new feature films, live action series, and animated series, so let’s go over everything that’s coming in 2021 and beyond.

1. Rangers of the New Republic

The first of two spinoffs to The Mandalorian, Rangers of the New Republic will take place during the timeline of the Mandalorian. Not much is known about who these rangers will be (my vote is for a Bo-Katan series…others might be hoping for more Timothy Olyphant) but it is rumored to contain crossover events with its sister series, which leads us to…

2. Ahsoka

Chapter 13 of The Mandalorian was just too good to not be a backdoor pilot. Ahsoka Tano, a beloved Jedi drop-out from The Clone Wars and Star Wars: Rebels, will be played by Rosario Dawson as she tracks down Grand Admiral Thrawn.

3. Andor

Starring Diego Luna once more as the titular Cassian Andor (from Rogue One), Andor has already begun filming in London and is set to release in 2022. Watch the trailer above for what few glimpses we’ve been given so far!

4. Obi-Wan Kenobi

We knew that Ewan McGregor would reprise his role as Obi-Wan Kenobi, but now we know that he will be joined by Hayden Christensen as Darth Vader. Set to take place 10 years after Revenge of the Sith (and nine years before A New Hope), the announcement of Vader definitely makes things interesting! 

5. The Bad Batch

Fans of The Clone Wars should be excited about The Bad Batch, and if we’ve learned anything from The Mandalorian, it’s that the events of Clone Wars and Rebels have a clear impact on live-action canonical characters. Announced earlier in 2020, The Bad Batch “follows the elite and experimental clones of the Bad Batch as they find their way in a rapidly changing galaxy in the immediate aftermath of the Clone War. Members of Bad Batch — a unique squad of clones who vary genetically from their brothers in the Clone Army — each possess a singular exceptional skill which makes them extraordinarily effective soldiers and a formidable crew. In the post-Clone War era, they will take on daring mercenary missions as they struggle to stay afloat and find new purpose.”

6. Star Wars: Visions

Lucasfilm President Kathleen Kennedy announced that there will be ten “fantastic visions” told through the lens of the world’s best Japanese anime creators. Little else is know about these animated short films, but they will definitely look spectacular.

7. Lando

Remember that moment at the end of Rise of Skywalker when Lando sat down next to the ex-enslaved Stormtrooper, Jannah (Naomi Ackie)? It was kind of a forced moment, but I suspect this is why. Helmed by Justin Simien (Dear White People), the series that can easily launch with Lando helping Jannah look into where she came from.

I still maintain that it’s upsetting to know that so many of the Stormtroopers we’ve watched die are not Imperial volunteers but child soldiers…but…maybe an incredible and enlightened creator like Simien can help this make sense.

8. The Acolyte

Leslye Headland is the creator of Russian Doll, one of the most clever uses of the “groundhog day” device ever. This already has Netflix Jessica Jones or Daredevil vibes all over it. The idea of a darker, grittier, mystery-thrillier Star Wars has me amped.

To prepare you with knowledge about the High Republic era, check out Star Wars: The High Republic, a collection of original stories spanning a variety of comics, books, and more starting in January 2021.

9. A Droid Story

A Droid Story will be an animated series starring R2-D2 and C-3PO for Disney+. Lucasfilm President Kathleen Kennedy announced, “As we continue to develop new stories, the intersection of animation and visual effects offers new opportunities for us to explore. This epic journey will introduce us to a new hero guided by our most iconic duu…on a secret mission known only to them. What could possibly go wrong?”

10. Untitled Taika Waititi feature film

While Jojo Rabbit may have garnered Waititi an Oscar, it was with Thor: Ragnarok that he captured my attention. Waititi is clever, funny, cool, and talented so it’s no surprise that Lucasfilm President Kathleen Kennedy promised his film to be a wild ride.

11. Rogue Squadron

This one is so exciting we wrote an entire article about it. Wonder Woman director Patty Jenkins is determined to create the “greatest fighter pilot movie of all time.” She picked the right airframe — the T-65B X-Wing space superiority fighter has legendary status ever since Luke Skywalker jumped in the cockpit. Survivors of his Red Squadron at the Battle of Yavin would go on to form Rogue Squadron, named for the heroes of Rogue One. 

Rogue Squadron was founded by Luke Skywalker and Wedge Antilles, but this film should take place after The Rise of Skywalker and take us into “a new era” of flight.

MIGHTY MOVIES

6 movie scenes that show what military families go through

Military movies traditionally focus the lens on the troops fighting overseas while skipping the story of the families at home.


Here are 6 movie scenes that remind viewers how hard the lives of military spouses and children can be:

1. “We Were Soldiers” – Notification of next of kin

 

Families of deployed service members live with the dread of a casualty notification officer showing up. Families from the Vietnam War and earlier conflicts had the same fear, but it was embodied in taxi drivers who delivered dreaded telegrams. In “We Were Soldiers,” Julia Moore almost loses it when a cabbie walks to her door. Luckily he’s not there for her, just directions to another house.

The trauma for real-world families can be visceral. “I’ve picked family members off the floor,” Army chaplain Capt. Gregory J. Broderick told the Army News Service. “I’ve sat and held them as they’ve rocked and cried. People have been so upset they can’t change their baby’s diaper.”

2. “A War” – Family members are never the only priority

Service members have to juggle the needs of the nation with the needs of their family. In this clip from the Oscar-nominated “A War,” the commander’s wife argues for her husband to say whatever it takes to avoid jail time after an errant airstrike. For Claus Pederson, the commander, the necessity of supporting his family’s needs has to be balanced with the needs of his troops.

3. “American Sniper” – The family never knows when the service member is safe, except when they know they aren’t

Troops usually know whether the current danger level is high or low. They get updated on local threats, know when they’re safe behind walls or in the most dangerous part of the battlefield, and are watching out for enemies.

For family members, the threat is always real and they never know if their soldier is in relative safety or outside the wire. The only exception is when they’re actively speaking to their loved one, in which case every background noise is terrifying.

4. “The Hurt Locker” – The soldier who comes home may not be the one who left

“Hurt Locker” was Oscar gold but hated-on by vets (for good reason). But it got some parts of the military experience right. In this scene, explosive ordnance disposal technician William James is playing with his son while talking through his own scars from deployment. The family will often want to help, but troops may want to talk only rarely or not at all.

For James, the best course of action was apparently to talk to the only family member who can’t possibly understand.

5. “American Sniper” – PTSD can be a tough problem for military families

While most movies overplay the symptoms of PTSD, “American Sniper” earned a lot of credit for portraying a vet afflicted by the disorder as mostly just stuck in their own thoughts, rather than showing them as a caricature of violence.

American Sniper had other good scenes about vets struggling with normal relations at home, including this one from a barbecue and the scene in a mechanic’s shop.

6. “Independence Day” – Military families face national crises without a head of household

What the movies get wrong about blacksmiths
Photo: YouTube/TrailersPlaygroundHD

While “Independence Day” is hardly a gritty war movie, it contains one scene that reflects a dark reality for military families. When Will Smith’s Capt. Steven Hiller learns that aliens have arrived on earth, he immediately heads to base to get ready for a fight.

When the U.S. was attacked on 9/11, most Americans were reeling from the surprise attack and military families had to recover while their loved ones went to bases to get ready for deployment. President George W. Bush even said in his speech for all Americans with a uniform to get it ready.

MIGHTY MOVIES

This Lego remake of the ‘Solo’ trailer is out of this world

Solo, the origin story of everyone’s favorite space smuggler, blasts into theaters May 2018. To celebrate the film’s impending arrival, one die-hard Star Wars fan re-enacted the movie’s trailer with Legos. The remade stop-motion trailer features the audio from the film’s actual one-minute spot but all of the actors have been replaced with Legos new minifigs and ships. And it’s pretty freaking amazing.


What’s most impressive about the trailer is its dead-on accuracy. YouTuber Huxley Berg Studios clearly put in a lot of time and effort to meticulously recapture the best moments from the trailer, and his hard work absolutely paid off. It’s impossible not to get caught up in the moment when Lando tosses Han a blaster, even if they are both technically tiny pieces of plastic.

Star Wars and Lego have a long and beloved partnership so seeing Lego Han, Lego Chewie, and Lego Lando head off on some wild space adventure just feels right. And while the trailer might only be a minute, there are more than enough iconic moments captured to make any fan want to rewatch it. For now, the trailer only has a few thousand views but don’t be surprised if it ends up going viral, as there are few things people love more in the world than Legos and Han Solo.

This article originally appeared on Fatherly. Follow @FatherlyHQ on Twitter.

MIGHTY MOVIES

Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge park finally announced opening date

Before Star Wars fans get to see the next huge installment of the mega-popular space fantasy franchise, everyone will have the opportunity to live in the dangerous galaxy, thanks to Disney’s much-anticipated Star Wars theme park.

In a press release on March 7, 2019, the company finally announced the opening dates for Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge — and it’s ahead of schedule. The 14-acre expansion will open on May 31, 2019, at Disneyland in California and on Aug. 29, 2019, at Disney’s Hollywood Studios in Florida.


“On opening day for phase one, guests will be transported to the remote planet of Batuu, full of unique sights, sounds, smells, and tastes,” the release describes. “Guests can become part of the story as they sample galactic food and beverages, explore an intriguing collection of merchant shops, and take the controls of the most famous ship in the galaxy aboard Millenium Falcon: Smugglers Run.”

Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge to Open May 31 at Disneyland Resort, Aug. 29 at Disney’s Hollywood Studios

www.youtube.com

According to the statement, however, the park will open in phases “to allow guests to sooner enjoy the one-of-a-kind experiences that make Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge so spectacular.”

Phase two won’t open until later in 2019. It will feature the park’s largest attraction, Star Wars: Rise of the Resistance, where guests will board a full-size starship and join the battle against the First Order, including a face-off with Kylo Ren.

To visit the Disneyland park between May 31 and June 23, 2019, Disney says that guests will not only need valid theme park admission but also a “no-cost reservation.” Details on how to make that reservation have not yet been released but will be posted on Disneyland.com. The park will then open to the general public on June 24, 2019.

This article originally appeared on Fatherly. Follow @FatherlyHQ on Twitter.

Articles

This fake stealth fighter helped secure the real one

As we all know by now, the F-117 Nighthawk was America’s first combat-capable stealth aircraft. According to an Air Force fact sheet, it entered service in 1983, and was retired in 2008. It had a very effective career, serving in Operations Just Cause, Desert Storm, Allied Force, and Iraqi Freedom.


But one reason the F-117 was effective was because the Americans managed to keep it secret for the first five years it was in operation. As a result, many figured America’s stealth fighter would be named the F-19 – and in two techno-thrillers, the F-19 had major roles.

What the movies get wrong about blacksmiths
Photo: Air Force Master Sgt. Edward Snyder

It was best-known as the F-19 Ghostrider in Tom Clancy’s “Red Storm Rising.” In that novel, the planes carry out a daring raid to destroy Soviet Il-76 “Mainstay” radar planes, enabling NATO to secure air superiority in the early stages of the war. One F-19 crew later takes out a Soviet theater commander.

Clancy’s F-19 was very different from the F-117. It had a crew of two, and was capable of breaking Mach 1. It also carried weapons externally, including Sidewinder air-to-air missiles, and had a radar. While some sources, like Combat Aircraft Since 1945, credited the F-117 Nighthawk with the ability to carry the AIM-9 Sidewinder, most sources claim that the F-117 has no air-to-air capability.

What the movies get wrong about blacksmiths
A three-view graphic of what the F-19 was believed to look like. (Graphic from Wikimedia Commons)

The other appearance of the F-19 was in Dale Brown’s “Silver Tower.” This time, it had the right name, Nighthawk, but it also had a crew of two. Brown didn’t go into the detail of his F-19 that Clancy did in Red Storm Rising. Brown’s F-19s had one notable success, where they bluffed their way in to attack a Soviet base in Iran during Silver Tower. Both planes were shot down and their crews killed.

After the F-117’s public reveal, the speculative F-19s were largely forgotten. But the “F-19” speculation helped keep the F-117 secret – and that secrecy was critical to the battlefield success of America’s first stealth fighter.